Archivi tag: Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag

Blow away the morning dew sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

The ballad known as The Baffled Knight is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as orally transmitted in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” or “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning “: the male protagonist from time to time, is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant.

It could not miss the sea shanty version of this popular ballad in the text version best known as “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 version D), summarized in four stanzas

Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)

I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Another sea shanty version comes from the testimony of John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] comments that although Short started his Blow Away the Morning Dew with a verse of The Baffled Knight, he then digresses into floating verses. In fact three of the verses recorded and published by Terry, not one derive from The Baffled Knight! Short sang only the “flock of geese” verse to Sharp. Sharp did not publish the shanty, but other authors also give Baffled Knight versions. The other predominant version in collections is the American whaling version but still using the tune associated with The Baffled Knight and the chorus remaining close to the usual words. (from here)

Jim Mageean  from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

Rolling Sally Brown!

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time. Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

 

Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!

In this version the chorus doubles in two short sentences repeated by the crew in sequence after each line of the shantyman, here the work done is the loading of the ship
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!

Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!
 
(Oh way down South, way down South boys
Oh bound away, with a bone(1) in her mouth boys)
It’s down to Trinidad(2) to see Sally Brown boys,
She’s lovely on the foreyard, an’ she’s lovely down below boys,
She’s lovely ‘cause she loves me, that’s all I want to know boys,
Ol’ Captain Baker, how do you store yer cargo?
Some I stow for’ard (3) boys, an’ some I stow a’ter
Forty fathoms or more below boys,
There’s forty fathoms or more below boys,
Oh, way high ya, an’ up she rises,
Way high ya, and the blocks (4) is different sizes,
Oh, one more pull, don’t ya hear the mate a-bawlin?
Oh, one more pull, that’s the end of all the hawlin’
Sally Brown she’s the gal for me boys

NOTE
1) “Bone in her teeth” is the expression used for a bow wave, usually implying that the vessel in question was moving pretty fast. (see more here)
2) the southernmost of the Caribbean islands
3) the front and the back of a ship have a specific terminology
4) In sailing, a block is a single or multiple pulley

JOHN SHORT VERSION: ROLL AND GO

Not to be confused with “Spent My Money On Sally Brown”. Cecil Sharp ranks as capstan shanty.
In Short Sharp Shanties the project’s curators write”A
lthough, by Hugill’s time, ‘this shanty had only one theme – Sally and her daughter’, Short’s text is not on this ‘one theme’ – it is based around a less overtly sexual relationship.  Short gave Sharp more text than he actually published. It is always possible that Short may be self censoring – but there is no indication that this is the case, and from other textual evidence in Sharp’s field notebooks (e.g. see the notes to Hanging Johnny), rather the reverse. We have added just two floating verses at the end

Roger Watson from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Way, hey, roll and go

Oh Sally Brown, Oh Sally Brown
a long time ago
She promised for to marry me
Way, hey, roll and go
She promised for to marry me.
a long time ago

Oh Sally Brown is the girl for me
Oh Sally Brown has slighted me.
As I walked down one morning fair
it’s there I met her I do declare.
And I asked for to marry me
to marry me or let me be.
She spent me pay all around the town
she left me broken bad and dow.
Than I will pack me bags and go to sea
and I’ll leave my Sally on the quey

LINK
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2012/03/104-105-sally-brown-series.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/roll_boys_roll.htm

We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!

Leggi in italiano

“We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”, the title of a popular albeit short sea shanty, it means much more than its literal translation.

IS PADDY DOYLE  A BOARDING MASTER..

According to Stan Hugill, Paddy Doyle is the prototype of the boarding masters: Joanna Colcord misidentifies him with Paddy West. (see first part)

Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, that provide ” accommodation and boarding “. Often they welcome the sailors “on credit.” On the advance received by the boarders at the time of enrollment, they refer to food and lodging, and with the rest they provide their clothing and equipment of poor quality “. (Italo Ottonello).

Sailors then usually purchased a sea bag with dungarees, oilskins, sea boots, belt, sheath, knife and a pound of tobacco from the boarding master.
So the first month (or the first months depending on the advance) the sailor works to pay the boarding master, “We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”

a typical boarding house of Liverpool

OR A COBBLER?

According to other interpretations Paddy Doyle was a good Liverpool shoemaker “known to all the “packet rats”* sailing out of that port for the excellency of his sea-boots, and beloved for his readiness to trust any of the boys for the price of a pair when they were outward bound across “the big pond.” (Fred H. Buryeson)
* slang term for sailors

SEA SHANTY

Perfect shanty for short haulers, used expressly to collect the sails on the yard or to tighten them.

The song is short because the work does not last long. Thus wrote A.L. Lloyd “This is one of the few shanties reserved for bunting the fore or mainsail. Men aloft, furling the sail, would bunch the canvas in their hands till it formed a long bundle, the ‘bunt’. To lift the bunt on to the yard, in order to lash it into position, required a strong heave. Bunt shanties differ from others in that they employed fewer voices, and were sung in chorus throughout. Paddy Doyle, the villain of this shanty, was a Liverpool boarding house keeper.” and he continues in another comment The men stand aloft on foot-ropes and, leaning over the yard, the grab the bunched-up sail and try to heave the ‘sausage’ of canvas on to the yard, preparatory to lashing it in a furled position. The big heave usually comes on the last word of the verse, sometimes being sung as ‘Pay Paddy Doyle his his hup!’ But if the canvas was wet and heavy, and several attempts were going to be needed before the sail was bunted

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag

The Clancy Brothers&Tommy Makem

Paul Clayton who adds the verse  “For the crusty old man on the poop”

To me Way-ay-ay yah!(1)
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle(2) for his boots!
We’ll all drink whiskey(3) and gin!
We’ll all shave under the chin!
We’ll all throw mud at the cook(4)!
The dirty ol’ man’s on the poop! (5)
We’ll bouse (6) her up and be done!
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots! (7)

NOTES
1) a non sense line than other versions such as “Yes (yeo), aye, and we’ll haul, aye”. The strongest accent falls on the last syllable of the verse that corresponds to the tear-off maneuver for hoisting a sail
2) In other versions are used more sea terms and inherent to the sailor work: We’ll tauten the bunt, and we’ll be furl, aye; We’ll bunt up the sail with a fling, aye ; We’ll skin the ol’ rabbit an’ haul, aye.
3) or brandy
4) figure of speech to insult or talk badly
5) poop means both stern-aft and shit
6) bouse= nautical term its meanings: 1) To haul in using block and tackle. 2) To secure something by wrapping with small stuff. 3) To haul the anchor horizontal and secure it so that it is clear of the bow wave.In the context the reference is to the sail that is collected in a ‘bunt’, it is raised to fix it to the yard
7)In the context of the shanty the sailor complains of food and discipline and also having to pay Paddy Doyle for his poor equipment!

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/paddyd.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddydoyle.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=135246
http://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html

All for me Grog

Leggi in italiano

Yet another drinking song, “All for me Grog”, in which “Grog” is a drink based on rum, but also a colloquial term used in Ireland as a synonym for “drinking”.
grogThe song opens with the refrain, in which our wandering sailor specifies that it is precisely because of his love for alcohol, tobacco and girls, that he always finds himself penniless and full of trouble. To satisfy his own vices, johnny sells from his boots to his bed. More than a sea shanty it was a forebitter song or a tavern song; and our johnny could very well be enlisted in the Royal Navy, but also been boarded a pirate ship around the West Indies.

Nowadays it is a song that is depopulated in historical reenactments with corollaries of pirate chorus!
Al Lloyd (II, I, III)

The Dubliners from The Dubliners Live,1974

AC4 Black Flag ( II, III, VI)

 CHORUS
And it’s all for me grog
me jolly, jolly grog (1)
All for my beer and tobacco
Well, I spent all me tin
with the lassies (2) drinkin’ gin
Far across the Western Ocean
I must wander

I
I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since first I came ashore with me plunder
I’ve seen centipedes and snakes and me head is full of aches
And I have to take a path for way out yonder (3)
II
Where are me boots,
me noggin’ (4), noggin’ boots
They’re all sold (gone) for beer and tobacco
See the soles they were thin
and the uppers were lettin’ in(5)
And the heels were lookin’ out for better weather
III
Where is me shirt,
me noggin’, noggin’ shirt
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see the sleeves were all worn out and the collar been torn about
And the tail was lookin’ out for better weather
IV
Where is me wife,
me noggin’, noggin’ wife
She’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see her front it was worn out
and her tail I kicked about
And I’m sure she’s lookin’ out for better weather
V
Where is me bed,
me  noggin’, noggin’ bed
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see I sold it to the girls until the springs were all in twirls(6)
And the sheets they’re lookin’ out for better weather
VI
Well I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since I’ve been ashore for me slumber
Well I spent all me dough
On the lassies don’t ye know
Across the western ocean(7)
I will wander.

NOTES
1) grog: it is a very old term and means “liqueur” or “alcoholic beverage”. The grog is a drink introduced in the Royal Navy in 1740: rum after the British conquest of Jamaica had become the favorite drink of sailors, but to avoid any problems during navigation, the daily ration of rum was diluted with water.
2) lassies: widely used in Scotland, it is the plural of lassie or lassy, diminutive of lass, the archaic form for “lady”
4) nogging: in the standard English noun, the word means “head”, “pumpkin”, in an ironic sense. Being a colloquial expression, it becomes “stubborn” (qualifying adjective)
5) let in = open
6) the use of the mattress is implied not only for sleeping
7) western ocean: it is the term by which the sailors of the time referred to the Atlantic Ocean

A GROG JUG

1/4 or 1/3 of Jamaican rum
half lemon juice (or orange or grapefruit)
1 or 2 teaspoons of brown sugar.
Fill with water.

Even in the warm winter version: the water must be heated almost to boiling. Add a little spice (cinnamon stick, cloves) and lemon zest.
It is a classic Christmas drink especially in Northern Europe.

 GROG

( Italo Ottonello)
The grog was a mixture of rum and water, later flavored with lemon juice, as an anti-scorb, and a little sugar. The adoption of the grog is due to Admiral Edward Vernon, to remedy the disciplinary problems created by an excessive ration of alcohol (*) on British warships. On 21 August 1740 he issued for his team an order that established the distribution of rum lengthened with water. The ration was obtained by mixing a quarter of gallon of water (liters 1.13) and a half pint of rum (0.28 liters) – in proportion 4 to 1 – and distributed half at noon and half in the evening. The term grog comes from ‘Old Grog’, the nickname of the Admiral, who used to wear trousers and a cloak of thick grogram fabric at sea. The use of grog, later, became common in Anglo-Saxon marines, and the deprivation of the ration (grog stop), was one of the most feared punishment by sailors. Temperance ships were called those merchant ships whose enlistment contract contained the “no spirits allowed” clause which excluded the distribution of grog or other alcohol to the crew.
 (*) The water, not always good already at the beginning of the journey, became rotten only after a few days of stay in the barrels.
In fact, nobody drank it because beer was available. It was light beer, of poor quality, which ended within a month and, only then, the captains allowed the distribution of wine or liqueurs. A pint of wine (just over half a liter) or half a pint of rum was considered the equivalent of a gallon (4.5 liters) of beer, the daily ration. It seems that the sailors preferred the white wines to the red ones that they called despicably black-strap (molasses). Being destined in the Mediterranean, where wine was embarked, was said to be blackstrapped. In the West Indies, however, rum was abundant.

LINK
http://www.drinkingcup.net/navy-rum-part-2-dogs-tankys-scuttlebutts-fanny-cups/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5512
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/allformegrog.html
http://www.lettereearti.it/mondodellarte/musica/la-lingua-delle-ballate-e-delle-canzoni-popolari-anglo-irlandesi/

Blow away the morning dew shanty

Read the post in English

La ballata nota come The Baffled Knight è riportata in moltissime versioni testuali sia nelle raccolte settecentesche che nei Broadsides, oltrechè trasmessa oralmente in Gran Bretagna e America con i titoli di ” Blow (Clear)(Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” oppure “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning”: il protagonista maschile di volta in volta è un gentleman, o un pastorello / contadinello.

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty di questa popolarissima ballata nella versione testuale più nota come “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 versione D), riassunta in quattro strofe
Nils Brown in Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era un pastorello
che governava le pecore sulla collina
posò l’arco e la freccia
per dissetarsi
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Guardò in alto e guardò in basso
e di guardò intorno
e là vide una bella fanciulla
che nuotava nel ruscello
III
“Portami a casa da mio padre
prima di mettermi sotto,
poi avrai la mia verginità
e ventimila sterline”
IV
Quando arrivò al portone della casa paterna
in un guizzò lei entrò
e disse ” Puah! Sei uno scemo fuori
e io una fanciulla dentro”

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Un’altra versione sea shanty viene dalla testimonianza di John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] commenta che sebbene Short abbia iniziato il suo Blow Away the Morning Dew con un versetto da “The Baffled Knight”, poi divaga con versi fluttuanti. In effetti dei tre dei versi registrati e pubblicati da Terry, nemmeno uno derivano da The Baffled Knight! Short cantava solo la strofa “flock of geese” di Sharp. Sharp non ha pubblicato la shanty ma anche altri autori danno delle versioni di Baffled Knight. L’altra versione predominante nelle collezioni è la versione americana della caccia alle balene, ma che usa ancora la melodia associata a The Baffled Knight con  il coro che resta simile alle solite parole. (tratto da qui)

Jim Mageean  in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
* ci sono ancora troppe parole di cui non capisco bene la pronuncia
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo un bel mattino
per ammirare i prati nei dintorni
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
in giro per la campagna
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Mio padre aveva un destriero bianco latte, è nella stalla
non mangerà nè fieno, nè grano
e non andrà affatto
III
Quando andiamo in un aia
a vedere uno stormo di oche
le fissiamo negli occhi
chiudiamo i loro occhi
e ne abbattiamo cinque o sei
IV
Mentre camminavo
lungo le rive del fiume
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che aspettava la marea.
V
Mentre camminavo
sotto il chiaro di luna
fu là che vidi una  fanciulla bionda
?
VI
?
?
dice lei: “Giovanotto questo è il posto giusto dove un uomo può giocare”
VII
Mentre camminavo
per Paradise Street
là incontrai un fantasma
dice “
ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

STORMALONG JOHN

Illustrazione di Greg Newbold

Sea shanty in memoria del marinaio Stormie cioè il marinaio per eccellenza, secondo  A.L.Lloyd Stormalong era “the blusterous old skipper who stands his ground alongside Davy Jones and Mother Carey among the mythological personages of the sea. Some took him to be an embodiment of the wind, others believed he was a natural man…” ( Folk Song In England, 1967 ).
D’altro canto Alfred Bulltop Stormalong è un leggendario eroe americano del mare dalle proporzioni gigantesche e dalle imprese prodigiose, protagonista di molti racconti per bambini. E’ Stormalong “an able sailor, bold and true” e il suo funerale una sorta di ultimo addio alla gloriosa era dei grandi velieri, sconfitti sul finire dell’Ottocento dai battelli a vapore.
E’ classificata da Stan Hugill come la più vecchia nella serie della “Stormalong family”, un vasto gruppo di halyard shanties.

STORMALONG JOHN

Canto di origine afro-americane per il lavoro alle pompe o come canto all’argano.

ASCOLTA Jon Bartlett

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed per Black Flag In Game Soundtrack


Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone
Stormalong boys! Stormalong John!
Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone
Ah-ha, come along get along
Stormyalong John!
I dug his grave with a silver spade
I lower’d him down with a golden chain
I carried him away to Montego (Mobile) Bay
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito Stormalong ragazzi! Stormalong John! Vieni avanti
Stormyalong John!
Ho scavato la sua fossa con una spada d’argento
l’ho calato giù con una catena d’oro
e l’ho portato lontano da Montego Bay

MR. STORMALONG

Una delle versioni di John Short è intitolata Old Stormey (Mister Stormalong)
ASCOLTA Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Old Stormy’s dead and gone
to me way Stormalong!
Oh from Cape Horn where he was born.
Ay, ay, ay, Mister Stormyalong
Stormy is dead I saw him die
And more than rain it dim my eyes.
and now we’ll sing few old song
Roll her over, long and strong.
we dug his grave with a silver spade
his shroud of the finest silk was made.
we lower’d him down with a golden chain
and we’ll see that he don’t rise again.
I wish I was old Stormy’s son
I give those sailors lots of rum.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito to me way Stormalong!
Oh a Capo Horn dov’era nato
Ay, ay, ay, Mister Stormyalong
Stormy è morto l’ho visto morire
e più di una lacrima offusca il mio sguardo
e adesso canteremo qualche vecchia canzone, falla andare grande e forte, abbiamo scavato la fossa con una spada d’argento, il suo sudario era fatto della seta più bella, l’abbiamo calato giù con una catena d’oro
e abbiamo visto che non si è rialzato.
Se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy
darei ai marinai un sacco di rum

Una versione più estesa è riportata in “American Sea Songs and Chanteys,” di Frank Shay, 1948
ASCOLTA Ivan Neville in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
Old Stormy’s gone, that good old man,
To my way hay,
Stormalong, John!

Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone,
To my aye, aye, aye, aye,
Mister Stormalong!

We dug his grave with a silver spade,
His shroud of the finest silk was made.
We lowered him with a silver chain,
Our eyes all dim with more than rain.
An able sailor, bold and true,
A good old bosun to his crew.
II
He’s moored at last, and furled his sail,
No danger now from wreck or gale.
I wish I was old Stormy’s son,
I’d build me a ship of a thousand ton (1).
I’d fill her up with New England rum,
And all my shellbacks they would have some.
I’d sail this wide world ‘round and ‘round,
With plenty of money I would be found.
III
Old Stormy’s dead and gone to rest,
To my way hay, Stormalong, John!
Of all the sailors he was the best,
To my aye, aye, aye, aye, Mister Stormalong!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il vecchio Stormy è morto, quel brav’uomo A me way hay
Stormalong, John!

Il povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito A me aye, aye, aye, aye,
Mister Stormalong!
Abbiamo scavato la fossa con una spada d’argento, il sudario era fatto della migliore seta e lo abbiamo calato giù con una catena d’argento, con gli occhi pieni di pianto, un valido marinaio, ardito e sincero, un buon vecchio nostromo per la sua ciurma.
II
Infine è si è ormeggiato e ha ammainato la vela, nessun pericolo di un naufragio o di una tempesta, se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy costruirei una nave di mille tonnellate.
La riempirei con il rum del New England
e tutti i miei marinai ne avrebbero un po’.
Salperei per questo vasto mondo in lungo e in largo
e vorrei trovare un sacco di soldi.
III
Il vecchio Stormy è morto e andato a riposare a me way hay, Stormalong, John!
di tutti i marinai era il migliore!
To my aye, aye, aye, aye, Mister Stormalong!

NOTE
1) secondo John Sampson si tratta di John Willis armatore londinese che costruì il Cutty Sark; il padre John Willis potrebbe essere il nostro Stormalong; così scrive nel suo  “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” (1926) “I have heard that the prototype of this noble shanty was old John Willis, a famous early Victorian ship master and owner, whose son was the John Willis known as Old White Hat and who will be remembered chiefly as the owner of the famous Cutty Sark.”

IL LAMENT: Stormy Along, John

La versione di John Shortis a beautiful example of the fact that a tune does not have to have musical bars all the same length in order to give a consistent working rhythm.”

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


I wish I was old Stormy’s son,
to me way-ay Stormalong John
O I wish I was old Stormy’s son
Ah-ha, come along get along
Stormyalong John!
And if I was old Stormy’s son
I build a ship of a thousand ton;
I’ll load her with jamaiky rum,
and all my shellbacks they have some;
I’d treat you well and raise your pay
and  stand you drinks five times a day (1);
O was you ever in Quebec?
A-stowing timber on the deck;
I wish I was in Baltimore
On the grand old American shore;
And when we get to Liverpool town
We’ll chased that judies round and round
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere il figlio del vecchio Stormy, a me way-ay Stormalong, John!
Vorrei essere il figlio del vecchio Stormy; procedete tutti uniti
Stormyalong John!
Oh se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy
costruirei una nave di mille tonnellate.
La riempirei con il rum giamaicano
e tutti i miei marinai ne avrebbero un po’. Vi tratterei bene e vi aumenterei la paga
e vi farei bere 5 volte al giorno.
Sietemai  stati in Quebec?
A caricare legna nella stiva;
Vorrei essere a Baltimora
sulla riva dei Grandi Laghi d’America;
e quando arriveremo a Liverpool
rincorreremo quelle ragazze dappertutto

NOTE
1) sono le razioni giornaliere del grog

continua Carry him to his burying ground
continua Yankee John Stormalong

FONTI
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/494.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/generaltaylor.html
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/23-mister-stormalong.html
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/24-stormy-along-john.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=39676
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/stormalong.html
http://ingeb.org/songs/ostormys.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/Stormalong.htm

ASSASSIN’S CREED: BLACK FLAG & ROGUE

Finita l’epoca dei grandi velieri il repertorio delle canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty), documentato dai veterani in pensione, è sbarcato sulla terra diffondendosi tra i non marinai e gli amanti della musica folkloristica “..alcune delle canzoni che ho citato ora sembrano sciocche vedendole scritte. Non sono il genere di canzoni da stampare. Sono canzoni che devono essere cantate in certe condizioni, e dove quelle condizioni non esistono, appaiono fuori luogo. In mare, quando sono cantate nel tranquillo gaettone, o alando le cime, sono le più belle di tutte le canzoni. È difficile scriverle senza emozione, perché sono parte della vita. Non si possono separare dalla vita. Non si può scrivere una parola di loro senza pensare ai giorni andati, o a compagni da molto tempo diventati corallo, o a belle, vecchie navi, una volta così maestose, ora ferro vecchio.” (John Masefield in “Sea Songs” 1906)

After the Golden Age of Sail , the repertoire of maritime songs (sea shanty), documented by retired veterans, has landed on the shore spreading among non-sailors and folk music fans “

Una raccolta moderna dei canti marinareschi ovvero Shanties from the Seven Seas è di Stan Hugill (1961) con informazioni di prima-mano, la cosiddetta “shantyman’s bible“!

A modern collection is titled “Shanties from the Seven Seas” by Stan Hugill (1961) with first-hand information, the so-called “shantyman’s bible”!

Una grande rivalutazione di questi canti è avvenuta poi più recentemente con la produzione in versione piratesca del famosissimo videogioco Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag (2013); la trama è un’intricata vicenda basata sui ricordi del pirata Edward Kenway  ed è ambientata nel mare dei Caraibi in un arco storico che va dal 1715 al 1721.

A great re-evaluation of these songs took place more recently with the production of a pirate version of the famous Assassin’s Creed videogame: Black Flag (2013); the plot is an intricate story based on the memories of the pirate Edward Kenway and it is set in the Caribbean Sea in a historical arch that goes from 1715 to 1721.

Come già sottolineato da più parti, per quanto il lavoro svolto dai creatori del videogioco Assassin Creed abbia portato le canzoni marinaresche in auge tra i giovani, si è trattato di una mistificazione: molti dei canti sono del secolo successivo e ogni riferimento alla cultura afro-americana che ne è stata per buona parte la fonte è volutamente ignorato.

As already underlined by many parties, although the work done by the creators of the video game Assassin Creed has brought maritime songs in vogue among the young, it was a mystification: many songs are from the next century and all references to African American culture source has been deliberately ignored.

Ma tanto di cappello per l’enorme produzione articolata in una serie di Cd e in particolare Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 1 e 2) e Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition) il sequel del video-gioco distribuito nel 2014

But hats off for the huge production articulated in a series of CDs and in particular Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 1 and 2) and Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition) the sequel of the video game released in 2014

Sono raccolte non solo canzoni marinaresche ma anche ballate e canzoni del mare, antiche drinking songs (canti di taverna) e qualche rebel song.

Not only maritime songs are collected, but also ballads and sea songs, ancient drinking songs (tavern songs) and some rebel songs.

Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 1 e 2)

ADMIRAL BENBOW
ALL FOR ME GROG
BILLY RILEY
BLOW AWAY THE MORNING DEW
BULLY IN THE ALLEY
CAPTAIN KIDD
CAPTAIN WARD (Child  #287)
CHEERLY MAN
COASTS OF HIGH BARBARY (Child  #285)
DEAD HORSE
DERBY RAM
DOWN AMONG THE DEAD MEN
DRUNKEN SAILOR
FATHOM THE BOWL
FISH IN THE SEA
GOLDEN VANITY (Child #286)
GOOD MORNING, LADIES ALL
HANDY ME BOYS
HAULEY HAULEY HO 
HERE’S A HEALTH TO THE COMPANY
HI-HO COME ROLL ME OVER
HOMEWARD BOUND
JOHNNY BOKER
LEAVE HER JOHNNY
LOWLANDS AWAY
MAGGIE LAUDER
MAID OF AMSTERDAM
NIGHTINGALE
PADDY DOYLE’S BOOTS
PADSTOW’S FAREWELL
PATRICK SPENS
RANDY DANDY-O
RIO GRANDE
ROLL AND GO
ROLL, BOYS, ROLL! (Sally Brown)
ROLLER BOWLER
RUNNING DOWN TO CUBA
SAILBOAT MALARKAY
SO EARLY IN THE MORNING
SPANISH LADIES
STORMALONG JOHN
TROOPER AND THE MAID
WILD GOOSE SHANTY
WILLIAM TAYLOR
WHERE AM I TO GO M’JOHNNIES
WHISK(E)Y JOHNNY
WORST OLD SHIP

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition)


BLOOD RED ROSES
BOLD RILEY
BONNIE LASS O’FYVIE
DONKEY RIDING
DON’T FORGET YOUR OLD SHIPMATES
GO TO SEA NO MORE
HAUL AWAY JOE
HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY
HENRY MARTIN (Child  #250)
HI FOR THE BEGGERMAN
JOLLY ROVING TAR
KATIE CRUEL
LITTLE DRUMMER
LIVERPOOL JUDIES
MY BONNIE HIGHLAND LASSIE
NEW YORK GIRLS
ONE MORE DAY
OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY
PAY ME THE MONEY DOWN
PADDY LAY BACK
ROLLING DOWN TO OLD MAUI
ROUND THE CORNER SALLY
SHALLOW BROWN
STAR OF THE COUNTY DOWN
WE BE THREE POOR MARINERS
WINDY OLD WEATHER
YE JACOBITES

Rolling Sally Brown!

Read the post in English

Nei sea shanties Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola con la quale il nostro marinaio di turno cerca di spassarsela (con lei o la figlia). Di probabile origine giamaicana secondo Stan Hugill,  era un canto popolare nei porti delle Indie Occidentali negli anni 1830. Le varianti testuali e melodiche sono molte.

ARCHIVIO

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

 

Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!

In questa versione il coro si sdoppia in due brevi frasi ripetute dalla ciurma in sequenza dopo ogni verso dello shantyman, qui il lavoro svolto è quello del carico della nave
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!

Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · Nils Brown da Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!
(Oh way down South, way down South boys
Oh bound away, with a bone(1) in her mouth boys)
It’s down to Trinidad(2) to see Sally Brown boys,
She’s lovely on the foreyard, an’ she’s lovely down below boys,
She’s lovely ‘cause she loves me, that’s all I want to know boys,
Ol’ Captain Baker, how do you store yer cargo?
Some I stow for’ard (3) boys, an’ some I stow a’ter
Forty fathoms or more below boys,
There’s forty fathoms or more below boys,
Oh, way high ya, an’ up she rises,
Way high ya, and the blocks (4) is different sizes,
Oh, one more pull, don’t ya hear the mate a-bawlin?
Oh, one more pull, that’s the end of all the hawlin’
Sally Brown she’s the gal for me boys
traduzione italiano* di Cattia Salto
Sally Brown è la ragazza per me,
ragazzi
Salpa e vai
Sally Brown è la ragazza per me,
ragazzi
Ala, Miss Sally Brown!
[Via verso il Sud, via verso Sud
ragazzi
partiamo con l’osso in bocca
ragazzi]
Andare a Trinidad
per vedere Sally Brown, ragazzi
è bella a prua
ed è bella in basso
è bella perchè mi ama
è tutto quello che voglio sapere
Vecchio Capitano Baker,
dove lo mettiamo il carico?
Un po’ lo mettiamo a prora  ragazzi
e un po’ lo mettiamo a poppa
40 braccia più sotto ragazzi
ci sono 40 braccia più sotto
ragazzi
Ala, si,  e  la nave si alza,
ala,  si,  e i bozzelli  sono di diverse dimensioni
ancora uno strappo, non avete sentito il primo sbraitare?
Ancora uno strappo e sarà la fine di ogni alaggio.
Sally Brown è la ragazza per me ragazzi

NOTE
* riveduta e corretta da Italo Ottonello
1) il verso saltato riprende un’espressione marinaresca ” a vele spiegate” cioè con tutte le vele tirate su (spiegazione qui)
2) la più meridionale delle isole caraibiche
3)  il davanti e il dietro di una nave hanno una specifica terminologia
4) Vengono chiamati bozzelli tutte le carrucole a bordo, di qualsiasi specie esse siano. I bozzelli vengono utilizzati per far cambiare direzione ad un cavo o per comporre dei paranchi. (tratto da Nautipedia)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: ROLL AND GO

Da non confondersi con “Spent My Money On Sally Brown”. Cecil Sharp la classifica come capstan shanty.
Scrivono i curatori del progetto Short Sharp ShantiesSebbene, ai tempi di Hugill, “questa shanty avesse un solo tema – Sally e sua figlia”, il testo di Short non è su questo “unico tema” – si basa su una relazione meno apertamente sessuale. Short ha dato a Sharp più testo di quanto effettivamente pubblicato. È sempre possibile che Short possa essersi auto-censurato, ma non c’è alcuna indicazione che questo sia il caso, e da altre prove testuali nei quaderni sul campo di Sharp (ad esempio vedere le note di Hanging Johnny), è piuttosto il contrario. Alla fine abbiamo aggiunto solo due versi fluttuanti

Roger Watson in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Way, hey, roll and go

Oh Sally Brown, Oh Sally Brown
a long time ago
She promised for to marry me
Way, hey, roll and go
She promised for to marry me.
a long time ago
Oh Sally Brown is the girl for me
Oh Sally Brown has slighted me.
As I walked down one morning fair
it’s there I met her I do declare.
And I asked for to marry me
to marry me or let me be.
She spent me pay all around the town
she left me broken bad and dow.
Than I will pack me bags and go to sea
and I’ll leave my Sally on the quey
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ala, salpa e vai
Oh Sally Brown, Oh Sally Brown
Tanto tempo fa
Lei promise di sposarmi
Ala, salpa e vai
lei promise di sposarmi
Tanto tempo fa.
Oh Sally Brown è la ragazza per me
Oh Sally Brown mi ha ignorato.
Mentre camminavo un bel mattino
t’incontrai lei, lo dico.
E le chiesi di sposarmi
di sposarmi o di lasciarmi stare.
Lei spendeva la mia paga per tutta la città e mi ha lasciato con il cuore a pezzi.
Allora prenderò il mio sacco e andrò per mare e lascerò Sally al molo

FONTI
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2012/03/104-105-sally-brown-series.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/roll_boys_roll.htm

We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!

Read the post in English

“We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!” (in italiano “Pagheremo Paddy Doyle per i suoi stivali!”) titolo di una popolare seppur breve sea shanty, significa molto più della sua traduzione letterale.

PADDY DOYLE A BOARDING MASTER..

Secondo Stan Hugill, Paddy Doyle è il prototipo dei boarding masters:  Joanna Colcord lo indentifica erroneamente con Paddy West. (vedi prima parte)

Le “boarding houses” sono pensioni per marinai, presenti in ogni grande porto di mare. “Sono tenute da procuratori d’imbarco (boarding masters), di dubbia reputazione, che i marinai definiscono «arruolatori», i quali forniscono «indifferentemente alloggio e imbarco». Spesso accolgono i marinai «a credito». Sull’anticipo ricevuto dai pensionanti all’atto dell’arruolamento, si rifanno del vitto e dell’alloggio, e con il resto forniscono loro abbigliamento e attrezzature di scarsa qualità“. (Italo Ottonello).
Nella sacca che il marinaio si portava a bordo c’erano di solito: giaccone, tela cerata, stivali da mare, cintura di pelle, coltellino nel suo fodero e un chilo di trinciato.
Così il primo mese (o i primi mesi a seconda dell’anticipo) il marinaio lavora per pagare il boarding master, “We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”

una tipica boarding house di Liverpool

O UN CALZOLAIO?

Secondo altre interpretazioni Paddy Doyle era un bravo calzolaio di Liverpool  “noto a tutti i “topi di sentina” * che salpavano da quel porto per la qualità dei suoi stivali da mare, e amato per la sua disponibilità a fidarsi di ogni marinaio sul prezzo di un paio, quando era in partenza per attraversare “il grande stagno” .” (Fred H. Buryeson)
*  “packet rats” letteralmente “topi delle navi di linea”, termine gergale con cui venivano chiamati i marinai

SEA SHANTY

Perfetta shanty per alaggi brevi, usata espressamente per raccogliere le vele sui pennoni o per serrarle.

Il brano è corto perché il lavoro non dura molto. Così scrive A.L. Lloyd “Questa è una delle poche shanty adatte per raccogliere le vele sui pennoni o per serrarle. Gli uomini in alto, avvolgendo la vela, stringevano stretto la tela tra le mani fino a formare un lungo involto, il “salsicciotto”. Per sollevare il salsicciotto sul pennone, e issarlo in posizione, era necessario un forte sollevamento. Bunt shanties differiscono dalle altre in quanto impiegavano poche voci e venivano cantate in coro per tutto il tempo. Paddy Doyle, il cattivo della shanty, era un procuratore d’imbarco di Liverpool. “E prosegue in un altro commento” Gli uomini stanno in piedi sul  marciapiede e, sporgendosi sul pennone, afferrano la vela ammucchiata e provano a sollevare la “salsiccia” di tela sul pennone, preparatoria per serrarla. Il grande strappo di solito arriva sull’ultima parola del verso, a volte viene cantato come “Pay Paddy Doyle!” Ma se la tela era bagnata e pesante, erano necessari diversi tentativi prima che la vela fosse imbrogliata “

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag

The Clancy Brothers&Tommy Makem

Paul Clayton  che aggiunge il verso “For the crusty old man on the poop”


To me Way-ay-ay yah!(1)
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle(2) for his boots!
We’ll all drink whiskey(3) and gin!
We’ll all shave under the chin!
We’ll all throw mud at the cook(4)!
The dirty ol’ man’s on the poop (5)!
We’ll bouse (6) her up and be done!
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots! (7)
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Con me tira-a-ah
Pagheremo Paddy Doyle per i suoi stivali!
Berremo tutti whisky e gin
Ci raseremo tutti sotto il mento,
getteremo tutti fango sul cuoco!
Lo sporco capitano è sulla poppa!
La isseremo a posto
Per pagare a Paddy Doyle i suoi stivali!

NOTE
1) la frase così come scritta è più una non sense rispetto ad altre versioni come “Yes (yeo), aye, and we’ll haul, aye” (in italiano: Sì, sì, e aleremo, sì). L’accento più forte cade sull’ultima sillaba del verso quello corrispondente alla manovra di strappo per l’issaggio di una vela
2) In altre versioni sono utilizzati termini più marinareschi e inerenti ai gesti impiegati: We’ll tauten the bunt, and we’ll furl, aye (in italiano:Teseremo gl’imbrogli, e serreremo, sì) We’ll bunt up the sail with a fling, aye (in italiano: imbroglieremo la vela in un baleno, sì)  We’ll skin the ol’ rabbit an’ haul, aye (in italiano: Serreremo la vela e aleremo, sì). Così ci illumina Italo Ottonello ” Per serrare è necessario che gli uomini, alati gl’imbrogli, «raccolgano la vela» impugnando una piega della tela il più possibile al disotto di loro, la sollevino [skin the rabbit] e la ripieghino sul pennone. Lo shanty sincronizza i movimenti per effettuare la manovra
3) oppure brandy
4) letteralmente “gettare fango sul cuoco” è un modo di dire per insultare o parlar male
5)
poop significa sia poppa (nave) che cacca, in senso lato sporco
6) bouse
= termine nautico i suoi significati: 1) To haul in using block and tackle. 2) To secure something by wrapping with small stuff. 3) To haul the anchor horizontal and secure it so that it is clear of the bow wave. Nel contesto il riferimento è alla vela che raccolta in un “salsicciotto” viene sollevata per fissarla al pennone
7) Nel contesto della shanty il marinaio si lamenta del vitto e della disciplina e anche di dover pagare Paddy Doyle per la sua fornitura scadente!

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/paddyd.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddydoyle.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=135246
http://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html

MAGGIE LAUDER

Maggie Lauder è una ballata attribuita a Francis Sempill (o Semple), Laird di Beltrees (1616 – 1685) che descrive “l’incontro” tra la bella Maggie e il loquace Rob (Rob the Ranter) un pipaiolo (per tradurre bonariamente il termine “piper”) del Border scozzese: dopo le presentazioni e i primi complimenti i due passano alla “danza” sull’erba con reciproco soddisfacimento. Nel nostro immaginario sulla Scozia stereotipata è inevitabile visualizzare un prestante Highlander in gonnellino che suona la Great Highland Bagpipe, anche se la cornamusa del Border è uno strumento più simile alla gaita!
In realtà nel 1600 gli scozzesi del Border portavano i pantaloni (vedibpgd021

Così  i passi di danza, abilmente descritti, significano ben altro!
Tutto quelle che vorreste sapere sulla canzone è stato ampiamente trattato nel sito The Lowland and Border Pipers’Society (qui). La ballata popolare in Scozia, Inghilterra e Irlanda vede una disputa sulla paternità della melodia, perchè con il titolo di ‘Moggy Lauder’ o “Maggy Laidir” è conosciuta come antica melodia per “irish pipes” (vedi)

AC4 Black Flag la versione al maschile
la versione al femminile
Tannahill Weavers in Dancing Feet 1987 con una marcia in più

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan (per il testo vedi)


I
Wha wadna be in love
Wi bonnie Maggie Lauder?
A piper met her gaun (1) to Fife,
And spier’d(2) what was’t they ca’d her:
Richt scornfully she answered him,
“Begone, you hallanshakerl (3)
Jog on your gate (4),
you bladderskate (5)!
My name is Maggie Lauder.”
II
“Maggie! quoth he; and, by my bags(6),
I’m fidgin’ fain (7) to see thee!
Sit doun by me, my bonnie bird;
In troth I winna steer(8) thee;
For I’m a piper to my trade;
My name is Rob the Ranter:
The lasses loup(9) as they were daft,
When I blaw up my chanter(10).”
III
“Piper, quo Meg, hae ye your bags,
Or is your drone (11) in order?
If ye be Rob, I’ve heard o’ you;
Live you upo’ the Border?
The lasses a’, baith far and near,
Have heard o’ Rob the Ranter;
I’ll shake my foot wi’ richt gude will,
Gif ye’ll blaw up your chanter.”
IV
Then to his bags he flew wi’ speed;
About the drone he twisted:
Meg up and wallop’d ower the green;
For brawly(12) could she frisk it
“Weel done”! quo he.
“Play up!” quo she.
“Weel bobb’d!” quo Rob the Ranter;
“It’s worth my while to play, indeed,
When I hae sic a dancer!
V
“Weel hae ye play’d your part! quo Meg;
Your cheeks are like the crimson
There’s nane in Scotland plays sae weel,/ Sin’ we lost Habbie Simson(13).
I’ve lived in Fife, baith maid and wife,
This ten years and a quarter;
Gin ye should come to Anster Fair,
Spier(2) ye for Maggie Lauder.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Chi non si innamorerebbe
della bella Maggie Lauder?
Un pipaiolo la incontrò che andava a Fife
e le chiese come si chiamava:
Con fare sprezzante lei gli rispose
“Vattene, vagabondo,
per la tua strada,
tu sacca del vento!
Mi chiamo Maggie Lauder”
II
“”Maggie – disse lui – per la mia piva,
sono contento di vederti!
Siediti accanto a me, mio bel uccellino
non voglio darti fastidio:
che io sono un pipaiolo di mestiere
e mi chiamo Rob “l’eloquente”:
le fanciulle saltellano come matte, quando io soffio sul mio chanter.”
III
“Pipaiolo – disse Meg – avete sacca e bordone in ordine?
Se voi siete Rob, ho sentito parlare di voi; vivete vicino al Border?
Le fanciulle vicine e lontane hanno sentito parlare di Rob “l’eloquente”; sbatterò il piede di buona lena,
se voi soffierete sul chanter”
VI
Allora prese velocemente la piva
e suonò il bordone:
Meg galoppò sul prato
che molto bene lei si sapeva muovere
“Ben fatto” – disse lui
“Suona su” -disse lei
“Bella piroetta – disse Rob l’eloquente – Vale la pena suonare invero
quando si ha una tale ballerina!”
V
“Avete suonato bene la vostra parte – disse Meg –
le vostre guance sono di porpora,
nessuno in Scozia suona così bene.
da quando è morto Habbie Simson.
Ho vissuto a Fife sia da fanciulla che da sposa questi dieci anni e un quarto;
se volete venire alla fiera di Anster
chiedete di Maggie Lauder”


NOTE
In “The Scots Musical Museum” #544 con il titolo “Wha wadna be in love &c.”
1) gaun=going
2) spier’d=enquired, asked
3) hallanshaker=tramp
4) gate=way
5) bladderskate=windbag, gossiper, prattler, noisy talker.
6) bags=anche se al plurale, si tratta della “sacca” della piva. Il piper nel dipinto sta soffiando l’aria (e ci vogliono dei bei polmoni) mediante il blow pipe (ossia la canna dell’aria o per soffiare) nel bag – il sacco- che premuto dal braccio sinistro manda l’aria nelle altre canne collegate (delle piccole ance sono inserite all’imboccatura tra canne e sacco e sono proprio loro che vibrando producono il suono); il piper muovendo le dita sul chanter (ossia la canna del canto) modula la melodia su una scala di sole 9 note, mentre il suono di bordone cioè un suono continuo viene prodotto dai tre drones: uno più lungo di basso (quello più vicino alla testa) e due più corti di tenore. Per un distinguo su cornamuse, loro caratteristiche distintive e sonorità vi rimando qui: oltre  alla Great Highland Bagpipe troviamo anche la Border bagpipe (o Scottish Lowland bagpipe), presenti in Scozia almeno a partire dal XVIII secolo, sono caratterisitche dei Borders, ma anche del Perthshire e Aberdeenshire: mantengono il caratteristico tono vibrante della cornamusa delle regioni settentrionali ma a un volume più basso. Ma si costruiscono anche le border pipes in si bemolle, quelle in la, le scottish smallpipes, le fully chromatic border bagpipe chanter, e le bellows.
7) fidgin’ fain=excited, fidgetingly eager, ie “fucking glad”
8) steer=interfere with, stir/molest
9) loup=leap/jump about
10) chanter=pipe of bagpipe on which the melody is played
11) drone=the pipes on a bagpipe tuned to a fixed note
12) brawly=handsomely
13) ‘The Life and Death of Habbie Simpson, Piper in Kilbarchan’ scritto dal padre di Francis, Sir Robert Sempill (c.1595-c.1665). Gli abitanti di Kilbarchan sono chiamati “Habbies”

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/piva.html
http://lbps.net/lbps/repertoire/65-maggie-lauder.html http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/15900 http://burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-vi,-song-544-pages-562-and-563-wha-wadna-be-in-love-c.aspx