Archivi tag: Anne Campbell MacLeod

E la barca va: The Prince & the Ballerina

Leggi in italiano

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met Charles Stuart. After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) the then twenty-six-year-old Bonnie Prince managed to escape and remain hidden for several months, protected by his loyalists, despite the British patrols and the price on his head!
Charles found many hiding places and support in the Hebrides but it was a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.

THE PRINCE & THE BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes the girl, Flora MacDonald.
The MacDonalds as loyal to the king and Presbyterian confession, but they were sympathizers of the Jacobite cause and so Flora who lived in Milton (South Uist island) went on visiting her friend, wife of the clan’s Lady Margareth of Clanranald , and she was presented to Charles Stuart.

In another version of the story the prince was hiding at the Loch Boisdale on the Isle of South Uist, hoping to meet Alexander MacDonald, who had recently been arrested. Warned that a patrol would inspect the area, Charles fled with two jacobites to hide in a small farm near Ormaclette where the meeting with Flora MacDonald had been arranged. The moment was immortalized in many paintings like this by Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, there was the Bonny Prince! (see more)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraThe boat with four (or six) sailors to the oars left Benbecula on 27 June 1746 for the Isle of Skye in the Inner Hebrides. They arrived to Portée and on July 1st they left, the prince gave Flora a medallion with his portrait and the promise that they would meet one day

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Among the Scottish dances is still commemorated the dance with which Flora performed in front of the Prince. It ‘a very graceful dance, inevitable in the program of Highland dance competitions: it is a courtship dance, in which girl shows all her skills while maintaining a proud attitude and composure.
It is performed with the Aboyne dress, dress prescribed for the dancers in the national Scottish dances, as disciplined by the dance commission in the Aboyne Highland Gathering of 1970 (with pleated skirt doll effect, in tartan or the much more vaporous white cloth) .
Melody is a strathspey, which is a slower reel, typical of Scotland often associated with commemorations and funerals.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Many other musical tributes were dedicated to the beautiful Flora. The melody of this reel appears with many titles, the first printed version is found in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances”, 1757 and also in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland by Niel Gow (Vol I). The reel is in two parts

Tonynara from “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: CLAN MACKINNON COCKTAIL

Rusty-NailTo repay the help given by Clan MacKinnon during the months when he had to hide from the English, Prince Stuart revealed to John MacKinnon the recipe for his secret elixir, a special drink created by his personal pharmacist. The MacKinnon clan accepted the custody of the recipe, until at the beginning of the ‘900, a descendant of the family decided that it was time to commercially exploit the recipe calling it “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie

Procedure: directly prepare an old fashioned glass with ice. Stir gently and garnish with a twist of lemon.

A double-scottish cocktali: Scotch Whiskey and Drambuie which is a liqueur whose recipe is a mix of whiskey, honey … secrets and legends. Even today the company is managed by the same family and keeps the contents of the recipe secret. (Taken from here)

At this point many will ask “But the Skye boat song, where did it end?” (here  is)

LINK
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org

Outlander: Skye boat song

Leggi in italiano.

“E LA BARCA VA”

charlie e flora
Flora and the Prince

After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart, then twenty-six, escaped and remained hidden for several months, protected by his faithful.
Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met the Bonnie Prince and helped him to leave the Hebrides; we see them depicted into a boat at the mercy of the waves, she wraps in her shawl and looks at the horizon as the sun sets, he rows with enthusiasm.
(here’s how it actually went: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

THE CROSSING AT SEA: THE ESCAPE OF CHARLES STUART

The “romantic” escape is remembered in “Skye boat song” written by Sir Harold Boulton in 1884 on a scottish traditional melody which is said to have been arranged by Anne Campbell MacLeod; a decade ago Anne was on a trip to the Isle of Skye and heard some sailors singing “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in English “The Cuckoo in the Grove”). “The Cuckoo in the Grove” was printed in 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, by Alfred Moffat, with a text attributed to William Ross (1762 – 1790). The melody is therefore at least dating back to the time of the story.

LO IORRAM
The song (in “Songs of the North” by Sir Harold Boulton and Anne Campbell MacLeod, London  1884)  is a “iorram”, not really a sea shanty: his function is giving rhythm to the rowers but at the same time it was also a funeral lament. The time is 3/4 or 6/8: the first beat is very accentuated and corresponds to the phase in which the oar is lifted and brought forward, 2 and 3 are the backward stroke. Some of these tunes are still played in the Hebrides as a waltz.

The song was a success: from the very beginning rumors circulated that they passed the text as a translation of an ancient Gaelic song and soon became a classic piece of Celtic music and in particular of traditional Scottish music (revisited from beat to smooth, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), countless instrumental versions (from one instrument – harp, bagpipe, guitar, flute – or two up to the orchestra) with classical arrangements, traditional, new age, also for military and choral bands.


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king(1)
Over the sea to Skye (2)
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked (3) in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head

III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again (4).

NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Who was the “Young Pretender”? Probably just a dandy with the Italian accent and the passion of the brandy, but how much was the charm that exercised on the Scottish Highlands! (see more)
2) Skye isle in theInner Hebrides, but it sounds like “sky” and therefore a metaphor, Charlie is a hero in the firmament
3)  “rocked” as in many sea songs and sea shanties it stand for “cradled by the sea”
4) in 1884 Charles Stuart was dust, but romantic literature maintained live the Jacobite spirit and songs still burned in hearts

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)In 1896 Robert Louis Stevenson wrote “Over the sea to Skye” (aka Sing Me a Song of a Lad That Is Gone) a new version of Sir Harold Boulton’s Skye Boat song, because he wasn’t satisfied with what it was written by an English baronet.
Charles Edward wasn’t a Bonny Prince any more but an old, sickness man, even if in his “golden” exile between Rome and Florence. Vittorio Alfieri describes him as tyrannic and always drunk husband (but he was in love with Louise of Stolberg-Gedern -Charles Edward’s fair-haired wife). The Prince, embittered and addicted to alcohol, died in Rome on 31 January 1788 (also abandoned by his wife four years ago).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
Robert Louis Stevenson 1896)
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?

III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.

OUTLANDER VERSION

Skye Boat song’s tune is a principal theme in Outlander tv series sung by Raya Yarbrough and arranged by Bear McCreary, from Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem,  referencing how Claire Randall travels 200 years back in time.
Outlander season I -The Skye Boat Song (Short)
Outlander Season I -The Skye Boat Song (Extended)
Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song (French version)

Outlander season 3  -The Skye Boat Song Caribbean version

I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul (1), she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye. 
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.


French Version
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone,
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun,
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
III
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye.
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rùm on the port
Eigg on the starboard bow
Glory of youth glowed in her soul
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there
Give me the sun that shone
Give me the eyes, give me the soul
Give me the lass that’s gone
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas
Mountains of rain and sun
All that was good, all that was fair
All that was me is gone
Notes
1) she was feeling very merry in her heart, she was happy

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

LOCH TAY BOAT SONG

Iorram Loch Tatha è una slow air tradizionale arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod mentre il testo è di Harold Boulton.

SIR HAROLD BOULTON

Sir Harold Boulton (1859 – 1935), inglese, eclettico personaggio dell’Ottocento, ricco imprenditore, filantropo, traduttore di canzoni in lingua gaelica ha curato “Songs of The North : Gathered Together from the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland “, in 4 volumi (1885-1926), ma anche Songs of the Four Nations: A Collection of Old Songs of the People of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales (1892) e Our National Songs (3 volumi, 1923-31). Ha scritto Songs Sung and Unsung (1894) oltre a vari libretti sempre sui canti della Scozia, ha scritto anche un poemetto in versi dal titolo The Huntress Hag of Blackwater: A Mediaeval Romance (Londra: Philip Allan, 1926).

Uomo del suo tempo era innamorato della Scozia e delle sue tradizioni popolari e ha scritto molte canzoni ambientate in quella terra, ricche di spunti propri della poesia romantica. Con un vezzo tipico degli scrittori del tempo (e dei pre-romantici con James MacPerson in testa) gioca sull’ambiguità della “traduzione del gaelico” di antichi canti popolari e la loro riscrittura o composizione ex-novo.

LA CANZONE DEL BARCAIOLO

Loch Tay Boat Song nel libro Songs of the North Vol III è definita con il sottotitolo in gaelico una Iorram del Lago Tay ossia una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song,  un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle isole Ebridi come valzer. La melodia è stata raccolta sul campo dalla voce della signora Cameron a Inverailort, nel distretto di Moidart, nel 1870

Qui però siamo nel Perthshire nel “cuore della Scozia” come è definita la sua più affascinante regione, nel placido lago Tay e nel tramonto della sera, un barcaiolo canta per la sua nighean ruadh, la ragazza dai capelli rossi che l’ha lasciato.

Silly Wizard in “Kiss the tears away” 1983 (gli anni con la formazione in quattro qui con Phil Cunningham alle tastiere)

ASCOLTA Paul McKenna

ASCOLTA Graham Brown Band (per una buona metà la versione è strumentale)

ASCOLTA Jeff Snow versione strumentale per chitarra

TESTO DI SIR HAROLD BOULTON
I
When I’ve done my work of day,
And I row my boat away,
Doon the waters o’ Loch Tay,
As the evening light is fading,
And I look upon Ben Lawers(1),
where the after glory glows,
And I think on two bright eyes,
And the melting mouth below.
II
She’s my beauteous nighean ruadh,
She’s my joy and sorrow too.
And although she is untrue,
Well I cannot live without her,
For my heart’s a boat in tow,
And I’d give the world to know
Why she means to let me go,
As I sing horee, horo.
III
Nighean ruadh your lovely hair,
Has more glamour I declare
Than all the tresses rare,
`Tween Killin and Aberfeldy(2).
Be they lint white, brown or gold,
Be they blacker than the sloe,
They are worth no more to me,
Than the melting flake o’ snow.
IV
Her eyes are like the gleam,
O’ the sunlight on the stream,
And the song the fairies sing,
Seems like songs she sings at milking(3)
But my heart is full of woe,
For last night she bade me go
and the tears begin to flow,
As I sing ho-ree, ho-ro.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Quando il mio giorno di lavoro è finito, sulla barca remo lontano
nelle acque del Loch Tay
mentre la luce della sera svanisce,
e mi rivolgo verso Ben Lawers(1)
dove risplende l’ultimo chiarore,
sognando due occhi luminosi
e una bocca allegra sotto
II
Lei è la mia bella Ragazza dai capelli rossi, la mia gioia e anche il mio dolore
e sebbene insincera
non posso vivere senza di lei,
ma il mio cuore è una barca a traino,
e darei il mondo per conoscere
perchè lei mi vuole lasciare,
mentre canto horee horo
III
Ragazza dai capelli rossi, i tuoi bei capelli sono i più seducenti, io proclamo,
di tutte le trecce belle
da Killin a Aberfeldy(2).
Siano argento, castano o oro
o che siano più nere del prugnolo,
valgono meno per me
di un fiocco di neve disciolto.
IV
Oh i suoi occhi sono come il bagliore
della luce del sole sul torrente,
e come le canzoni delle fate
sono le canzoni che lei canta alla mungitura(3),
ma il mio cuore è pieno di dolore, perchè ieri sera lei mi ha lasciato e le lacrime cadono
mentre canto horee horo


NOTE
1) Ben Lowers: la più alta montagna del Perthshire
2) località intorno al lago Tay
3) la tradizione scozzese vanta una buon numero di canti in gaelico cantati durante la mungitura per tenere mansuete le mucche (vedi)

UNA VISITA AL LAGO TAY

Il Loch Tay è un lago che si estende tra i paesini di Killin e Kenmore, e la sua lunghezza è di 23 km. Con i suoi 150 metri di profondità è il sesto lago più profondo della Scozia e del Regno Unito. Il panorama migliore si gode dai due paesini citati in precedenza, dato che entrambe le rive sono fiancheggiate da catene montuose, tra cui spiccano le cime di Ben Lawers. A Killin, la vista è mozzafiato, infatti lì il lago si fonde con le rapide di Dochart, mentre Kenmore offre uno spettacolo più tranquillo e bellissimi tramonti. È un lago che nella regione del Perthshire offre una prospettiva e itinerari differenti da quelli più turistici attraverso le Highlands. (tratto da qui)

BICICLETTA.IT: Il Pertshire è una delle regioni più affascinati della Scozia. La faglia delle Highlands, formatasi durante l’era glaciale, la taglia in diagonale da ovest a est. A nord si trova la zona delle montagne e degli innumerevoli Lochs (laghi); a sud si trova invece una pianeggiante zona agricola. Questo significa che il paesaggio è sempre verdeggiante e ondulato, con molti punti panoramici. ‘Il cuore della Scozia’, ‘Il paese degli alberi giganteschi’ … se volete sapere perché la Scozia gode di tanta popolarità, dovete ritagliarvi un po’ di tempo per visitare queste regioni. I fiumi e i laghi tranquilli del Perthshire sono un’avventura indimenticabile. Caratteristiche di questo viaggio sono le piccole e attraenti cittadine, dove pace e relax regnano incontrastati, con colline ammantate di eriche, boschi aperti, ampie vallate, magnifiche spiagge sabbiose, pittoreschi villaggi di pescatori e numerose testimonianze del passato celtico e del presente innovatore. continua

800x442_3470_1883_1

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10153
http://thesession.org/tunes/9319/recordings

E la barca va: il Principe e la Ballerina

Read the post in English  

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), aveva 24 anni quando incontrò Charles Stuart. Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) il Bonnie Prince allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi, nonostante i pattugliamenti inglesi e la taglia sulla sua testa.
Charles trovò nelle isole Ebridi molti nascondigli e sostegno ma era un pericoloso gioco a rimpiattino..

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

Il principe era riuscito ad arrivare nell’isola di Banbecula delle Ebridi Esterne, ma la sorveglianza era strettissima e non aveva modo di fuggire. Ed ecco che entra in scena la fanciulla, Flora MacDonald..
I MacDonald per quanto leali al re e di confessione presbiteriana, erano simpatizzanti della causa giacobita e così Flora che viveva a Milton (isola South Uist) nella casa paterna, ma si trovava in visita dalla sua amica, nonché moglie del capoclan Lady Margareth di Clanranald, venne presentata a Charles Stuart.

In un’altra versione della storia il principe si trovava nascosto presso il Loch Boisdale sull’Isola di South Uist, sperando di incontrare Alexander MacDonald, che però era stato arrestato da poco. Avvisato che una pattuglia avrebbe ispezionato la zona, Charles fuggì con due fedelissimi per nascondersi in una piccola fattoria vicino a Ormaclette dove era stato concordato l’incontro con Flora MacDonald. Il momento venne immortalato in molti dipinti come questo di Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

Nella versione anedottica della storia, Flora escogitò un trucco per portare via dall’isola Charlie: con il pretesto di andare a trovare la madre (che viveva ad Armadale dopo essersi risposata), ottenne per sè e per i due suoi domestici il salvacondotto; sotto il nome e gli abiti della cameriera irlandese Betty Burke però si celava il Bonny Prince! (vedi)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraLa barca con quattro (o sei) marinai ai remi lasciò Benbecula il 27 giugno 1746 alla volta dell’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne. I due arrivarono fino a Portée in varie tappe e il 1° luglio si lasciarono, il principe  donò a Flora un medaglione con il suo ritratto e la promessa che si sarebbero rivisti un giorno…

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Tra le danze scozzesi è ancora commemorata la danza con cui  Flora si esibì davanti al Principe. E’ una danza molto aggraziata e leggiadra, immancabile nel programma delle esibizioni: è se vogliamo una danza di corteggiamento, in cui la ragazza mostra tutta la sua abilità mantenendo sempre portamento fiero e compostezza.
Si esegue con l’abito Aboyne ovvero il vestito prescritto per le danzatrici nei balli nazionali scozzesi, come disciplinato dalla commissione di danza nell’Aboyne Highland Gathering del 1970 (con gonna a pieghe effetto bambola, in tartan o la molto più vaporosa stoffa bianca).
La melodia è una strathspey, che è un reel più lenta tipica della Scozia spesso associata alle commemorazioni e ai funerali.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Alla bella Flora vennero dedicati molti altri omaggi musicali. La melodia di questo reel compare con molti titoli, la prima versione stampata si trova in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances“, 1757 e anche in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland di Niel Gow (Vol I). Il reel è in due parti

Tonynara in “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: IL COCKTAIL DEL CLAN MACKINNON

Rusty-NailPer sdebitarsi dell’aiuto prestato dal Clan MacKinnon durante i mesi in cui dovette nascondersi dagli Inglesi, il principe Stuart rivelò a John MacKinnon la ricetta del suo elisir segreto, una bevanda speciale creata dal suo farmacista personale. Il clan MacKinnon accettò la custodia della ricetta, finchè agli inizi del ‘900, un discendente della famiglia decise che era giunto il momento di sfruttare commercialmente la ricetta chiamandola “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie
Procedimento: si prepara direttamente un bicchiere tipo old fashioned con ghiaccio. Agitare delicatamente e guarnire con un twist di limone.

Un cocktali doppiamente scozzese: lo Scotch Whisky e il Drambuie che è un liquore la cui ricetta è un mix di whisky, miele… segreti e leggende. Ancora oggi l’azienda è gestita dalla stessa famiglia e mantiene segreto il contenuto della ricetta. (Tratto da qui)

A questo punti molti si chiederanno ” Ma la canzone della barca, la Skye boat song, dovè finita?” (eccola qui)

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org/tunes/2629