Archivi tag: Alexander Carmichael

Outlander book: giving a new wife a fish

Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK
Diana Gabaldon

In the first book of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon chapter 16 Jamie recites, the day after their wedding, an old love song to Claire, giving her a fish.

A good size,” he said proudly, holding out a solid fourteen-incher. “Do nicely for breakfast.” He grinned up at me, wet to the thighs, hair hanging in his face, shirt splotched with water and dead leaves. “I told you I’d not let ye go hungry.”
He wrapped the trout in layers of burdock leaves and cool mud. Then he rinsed his fingers in the cold water of the burn, and clambering up onto the rock, handed me the neatly wrapped parcel.
“An odd wedding present, may be,” he nodded at the trout, “
“It’s an old love song, from the Isles. D’ye want to hear it?”
“Yes, of course. Er, in English, if you can,” I added.
“Oh, aye. I’ve no voice for music, but I’ll give you the words.” And fingering the hair back out of his eyes, he recited,
“Thou daughter of the King of bright-lit mansions
On the night that our wedding is on us,
If living man I be in Duntulm,
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
Thou wilt get a hundred badgers, dwellers in banks,
A hundred brown otters, natives of streams,
a hundred silver trout, rising from their pools

A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis

Alexander Carmichael in his “Carmina Gadelica” Vol II, reports the fragment of this old Scottish Gaelic song, translating into English, and assuming that the author was a Macdonalds of the Isle of Skye. (a clan renowned for the poetic fame of its exponents of prominence)
Skye is probably the island of the Hebrides more similar to the land of Avalon, privileged location of many fantasy films, but more recently a inflated destination for mass tourism (with all the negative aspects of high prices, streets overcrowded by tourist buses and even to the most inaccessible destinations you risk finding yourself in a large company)


English translation *
I
Thou daughter of the king of bright-lit mansions,
On the night that our wedding is on us,/If living man I be in Duntulm
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
II
Thou wilt get an hundred badgers dwellers in banks,
An hundred brown otters native of streams,
Thou wilt get an hundred wild stags that will not come/ To the green pastures of the high glens.
III
Thou wilt get an hundred steeds stately and swift,
An hundred reindeer  intractable in summer,
And thou wilt get an hundred hummelled red hinds,
That will not go in stall in the Wolfmonth of winter
Scottish Gaelic
I
A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis (1),
An oidhche bhios oirnne do bhanais,
Ma ’s fear beo mi an Duntuilm (2)
Theid mi toirleum (3)  da d’earrais.
II
Gheobh tu ciad bruicean tadhal bruach,
Ciad dobhran donn, dualach alit,
Gheobh tu ciad damh alluidh nach tig
Gu innis ard ghleannaidh. (4)
III
Gheobh to ciad steud stadach, luath,
Ciad bràc (5) bruaill an t-samhraidh,
’S gheobh tu ciad maoilseach (6) maol, ruadh,
Nach teid am buabhall am Faoileach (7) geamhraidh

NOTES
* Alexander Carmicheal
1) roiseal soluis= fine bright light or display of light,
2) Duntulm  (Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Thuilm) is a township on the most northerly point of the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle Of Skye. The village is most notable for the coastal scenery coupled with the ruins of Duntulm Castle,
3) tòirleum: leum bras
4) Diana Gabaldon concludes the poem by adding a verse that recalls the comic situation created between the two protagonists “a hundred silver trout, rising from their pools”
5) bràc= brae= Beurla (reindeer)
6) bean an fhèid
7) Faoilteach

The symbolism of matrimonial gifts is evident: the abundance of herds is auspicious for the fertility of the couple.

LINK
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2106.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/books/pdf/carminagadelicah02carm.pdf
http://luideagbheag.blogspot.com/2016/11/a-nigheann-righ-nan-roiseal-soluis.html

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/duntulm-castle/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/07/01/isola-di-skye-informazioni-generali/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/06/30/isola-di-skye-4-giorni-tra-le-nuvole/

Outlander: i regali dello sposo

Read the post in English  

DAL LIBRO LA STRANIERA

Diana Gabaldon

Nel primo libro della saga Outlander scritto da Diana Gabaldon il capitolo 16 Jamie recita,  il giorno dopo il loro matrimonio, una vecchia canzone d’amore a Claire, dandole una trota appena pescata con le mani.
“E una vecchia canzone d’amore, viene dalle Isole. Vuoi sentirla?”
“Si, certo. Ehm in inglese, se puoi” aggiunsi.
“Oh, aye. Non sono granchè intonato, ma posso dirti le parole” E, togliendosi le ciocche dei capelli dagli occhi, recitò:
Tu, figlia del re dei castelli illuminati a giorno,
la sera del nostro matrimonio,
se ancora uomo vivo sarò a Duntulm,
a grandi balzi verrò da te pieno di doni.
Avrai cento tassi, che dimorano in riva ai fiumi,
cento lontre brune, native dei torrenti..

A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis

Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” Vol II, riporta il frammento di questa vecchia scottish song in gaelico scozzese, facendone la traduzione in inglese, supponendo che l’autore sia stato un Macdonalds delle Isole (clan rinomato per la fama poetica dei suoi esponenti di spicco) dell’isola di Skye.
Skye è probabilmente  l’isola delle Ebridi più simile alla terra di Avalon, location privilegiata di molti film fantasy e non, e più recentemente meta inflazionata del turismo di massa (con tutti gli aspetti negativi dei prezzi gonfiati, le strade sovraffollate dai bus turistici e anche alle mete più impervie rischiate di trovarvi in numerosa compagnia)

I
A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis (1),
An oidhche bhios oirnne do bhanais,
Ma ’s fear beo mi an Duntuilm (2)
Theid mi toirleum (3)  da d’earrais.
II
Gheobh tu ciad bruicean tadhal bruach,
Ciad dobhran donn, dualach alit,
Gheobh tu ciad damh alluidh nach tig
Gu innis ard ghleannaidh.
III
Gheobh to ciad steud stadach, luath,
Ciad bràc (5) bruaill an t-samhraidh,
’S gheobh tu ciad maoilseach (6) maol, ruadh,
Nach teid am buabhall am Faoileach (7) geamhraidh

traduzione inglese *
I
Thou daughter of the king of bright-lit mansions (1),
On the night that our wedding is on us,/If living man I be in Duntulm (2)
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
II (4)
Thou wilt get an hundred badgers dwellers in banks,
An hundred brown otters native of streams,
Thou wilt get an hundred wild stags that will not come/ To the green pastures of the high glens.
III
Thou wilt get an hundred steeds stately and swift,
An hundred reindeer intractable in summer,
And thou wilt get an hundred hummelled red hinds,
That will not go in stall in the Wolfmonth of winter
Traduzione italiana**
[Tu, figlia del re dei castelli illuminati a giorno,
la sera del nostro matrimonio
se ancora uomo vivo sarò a Duntulm, a grandi balzi verrò da te pieno di doni.
II
Avrai cento tassi, che dimorano in riva ai fiumi,
cento lontre brune, native dei torrenti]
Avrai cento cervi
che non andranno
sui verdi pascoli degli altopiani.
III
Avrai cento destrieri maestosi e dal piè veloce,
cento renne difficili da trattare in estate
Avrai cento cervi rossi senza corna
che non andranno nella stalla nel mese invernale di Gennaio.

NOTE
* Alexander Carmicheal
** Cattia Salto fuori dalle [ ]
1) letteralmente roiseal soluis= fine bright light or display of light, se fosse una fiaba verrebbe voglia di tradurre come “re della schiera luminosa” e prosegue “la notte del nostro matrimonio è alle porte
2) Duntulm Castle è un castello diroccato su uno spuntone di roccia sulla costa settentrionale di Trotternish , nell’isola di Skye. Sede del clan Mac Donald di Sleat a partire dal Seicento è stato abbandonato  nell’anno del 1730.
3) tòirleum: leum bras
4) Diana Gabaldon conclude il poema aggiungendo un verso che richiama la situazione comica creatasi tra i due protagonisti “cento argentee trote, che saltano dagli stagni
5) bràc= brae= Beurla (reindeer)
6) bean an fhèid
7) Faoilteach

Il simbolismo dei doni matrimoniali è evidente: l’abbondanza degli armenti è benaugurale per la fertilità della coppia.

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2106.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/books/pdf/carminagadelicah02carm.pdf
http://luideagbheag.blogspot.com/2016/11/a-nigheann-righ-nan-roiseal-soluis.html

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/duntulm-castle/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/07/01/isola-di-skye-informazioni-generali/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/06/30/isola-di-skye-4-giorni-tra-le-nuvole/

Aileen Duinn, Brown-haired Alan

Leggi in italiano

“Aileen Duinn” is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides: a widow/sweetheart lament for the sinking of a fishing boat, originally a waulking song in which she invokes her death to share the same seaweed bed with her lover, Alan.
According to the tradition on the island of Lewis Annie Campbell wrote the song in despair over the death of her sweetheart Alan Morrison, a ship captain who in the spring of 1788 left Stornoway to go to Scalpay where he was supposed to marry his Annie, but the ship ran into a storm and the entire crew was shipwrecked and drowned: she too will die a few months later, shocked by grief. His body was found on the beach, near the spot where the sea had returned the body of Ailein Duinn (black-haired Alan).

 The song became famous because inserted into the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy and masterfully interpreted by Karen Matheson (the singer of the Scottish group Capercaillie who appears in the role of a commoner and sings it near the fire)

Here is the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy: Ailein Duinn and Morag’s Lament, (arranged by Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in which the second track is the opening verse followed by the chorus

FIRST VERSION

The text is reduced to a minimum, more evocative than explanatory of a tragic event that it was to be known to all the inhabitants of the island. The woman who sings is marked by immense pain, because her black-haired Alain is drowned at the bottom of the sea, and she wants to share his sleep in the abyss by a macabre blood covenant.

Capercaillie from To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, the voice ‘kissed by God’ switches from the whisper to the cry, in the crashing waves blanding into bagpipes lament.

Meav, from Meav 2000 angelic voice, harp and flute

Annwn from Aeon – 2009 German group founded in 2006 of Folk Mystic; their interpretation is very intense even in the rarefaction of the arrangement, with the limpid and warm voice of Sabine Hornung, the melody carried by the harp, a few echoes of the flute and the lament of the violin: magnificent.

Trobar De Morte  the text reduced to only two verses and extrapolated from the context lends itself to be read as the love song of a mermaid in the surf of the sea (see also Mermaid’s croon)

It is the most reproduced textual version with the most different musical styles, roughly after 2000, also as sound-track in many video games (for example Medieval II Total War)

english translation
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go (1) with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(2)
I would drink(3), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
Scottish Gaelic
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\
shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,

NOTES
1) to die, to follow
2) for the inhabitants of the Hebrides Islands the seals are not simple animals, but magical creatures called selkie, which at night take the form of drowned men and women. Considered a sort of guardians of the Sea or gardeners of the sea bed every night or only on full moon nights, they would abandon their skins to reveal their human form, to sing and dance on the silver cliffs (here)
3) refers to an ancient Celtic ritual, consisting in drinking the blood of a friend as a sign of affection (the covenant of blood), a custom cited by Shakespeare (still practiced by all the friends of the heart who exchange blood with a shallow cut and joining the two cuts; it was also practiced for the handfasting in Scotland: once the handfasting was above all a pact of blood, in which the right wrist of the spouses was engraved with the tip of a dagger until the blood spurts, after which the two wrists were tied in close contact with each other with the “wedlock’s band” (see more.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECOND VERSION

Here is the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) from “Songs of the Hebrides“, see also Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) in his “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake from “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  from “Ships Ahoy !” 2011  

(english translation Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(scottish gaelic)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn,
o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat

Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart
an talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

Another translation in English with the title “Annie Campbell’s Lament”
Estrange Waters from Songs of the Water, 2016

Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..

THIRD VERSION

The most suggestive and dramatic version is that reported by Flora MacNeil who she has learned  from her mother. Born in 1928 on the Isle of Barra, she is a Scottish singer who owns hundreds of songs in Scottish Gaelic. “Traditional songs tended to run in families and I was fortunate that my mother and her family had a great love for the poetry and the music of the old songs. It was natural for them to sing, whatever they were doing at the time or whatever mood they were in. My aunt Mary, in particular, was always ready, at any time I called on her, to drop whatever she was doing, to discuss a song with me, and perhaps, in this way, long forgotten verses would be recollected. So I learned a great many songs at an early age without any conscious effort. As is to be expected on a small island, so many songs deal with the sea, but, of course, many of them may not originally be Barra songs”

A different story from Flora MacNeil’s family: the woman is married to Alain MacLeann who dies in the shipwreck with all the other men of her family: her father and brothers; the woman turns to the seagull that flies high over the sea and sees everything, as a witness of the misfortune; the last verse traces poetic images of a funeral of the sea, with the bed of seaweed, the stars like candles, the murmur of the waves for the music and the seals as guardians.

Flora MacNeil from  a historical record of 1951.


English translation
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
Scottish Gaelic
Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

NOTES
(1) Tuesday is still the day on which traditionally marriages are celebrated on the Island of Barra

FOURTH VERSION

Still a version set just like a waulking song and yet a different text, this time the ship is a whaler and Allen is shipwrecked near the Isle of Man.

Mac-Talla, from Gaol Is Ceol 1994, only the female voices and the notes of a harp, but what immediacy …

English translation
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi, I would go with thee.
I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

CHORUS
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
Scottish Gaelic
S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm

Outlander: Dance of the Druids

Leggi in italiano

Dance of the Druids (aka The Summoning) is a song composed  by Bear McCreary on a Gaelic prayer transcribed by Alexander Carmichael in his “Carmina Gadelica” (1900) entitled “Duan na Muthairne” ( Rune of the Muthairn).

An ancient song still known at South Uist in 1874, the witness Duncan MacLellan had heard from an old woman that repeated long chants night after night by the fire (then came the television!) Probably the old lady preferred the prayer in the Gaelic of his fathers instead of the Our Father of the Catholic Church!
Apparently a prayer to the Creator but  if in place of Rìgh na = “King of” we put a Rìghinn na = “Queen of” we get the description of the Milky Way
Raya Yarbrough  in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) – only the first stanza

 

I
Thou King of the moon (1),
Thou King of the sun,
Thou King of the planets (2),
Thou King of the stars,
Thou King of the globe,
Thou King of the sky (3),
Oh! Lovely Thy countenance,
Thou beauteous Beam (4).
II
Two loops of silk
Down by thy limbs,
Smooth-skinned (5);
Yellow jeweIs
And a handful
Out of every stock of them (6).
I
A Righ na gile (1)
A Righ na greine,
A Righ na rinne (2),
A Righ na reula,
A Righ na cruinne,
A Righ na speura (3),
Is aluinn do ghnuis,
A lub (4) eibhinn.
II
Da lub shioda
Shios rid’ leasraich
Mhinich, chraicich;
Usgannan buidhe
Agus dolach
As gach sath dhiubh

NOTES
Carmichael allowed himself rather a lot of freedom in his translations, so Tom Thomson (gaelic speaking) argues
1) “na gile” (of the whiteness)
2) I can’t see how “na rinne” (singular) can mean “of the planets” (plural) – it’s clearly singular and means either “of the world” or perhaps “of creation” or even “of the universe”
3) “na speura” (of heaven)
4) A lùb=”young man”
5) a silky skin, soft and luminous
6) Celts liked the golden jewellery

OUTLANDER SAGA

The novel is a romantic love story between Claire Randall and James Fraser aka James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser Lord of Broch Tuarach and their vicissitudes along Europe and the Americas. A portrait of Scotland in the mid-700 century torn by the Jacobite struggles and clan conflicts, carefully recreated by Diana Gabaldon, through the traditions and life of the Scottish people, in a rich and evocative style.

CRAIGH NA DUN

A story beginning  “over the top”, with a journey through time of the protagonist who, during her honeymoon in Inverness, finds herself projected into the past by crossing throug Craigh na Dun: from 1945 in 1743.
The theme of the Dance of the Druids renamed “Stones Theme” is often recalled in the Outlander television series linked to the mystery of the stone circle and to the rituals in the ancient religion.

second part

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/megalitismo.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/religione-celti.html?cb=1521975648601

http://www.carmichaelwatson.lib.ed.ac.uk/cwatson/en/catalogueentry/2126
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/corpus/Carmina/G9.html
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/archive/75760440?mode=transcription

Dance of the Druids aka Duan na Muthairn serie Outlander

Read the post in English

Per i fan della serie Outlander la” Danza dei Druidi” (anche con il titolo The Summoning) è un brano composto per l’occasione da Bear McCreary su una preghiera in gaelico trascritta da Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900)- in formato digitale (qui) detta “Duan na Muthairne” (Rune of the Muthairn)
Un antico canto ancora ripetuto nell’isola di South Uist nel 1874, il testimone tale Duncan MacLellan lo aveva ascoltato da una vecchia dell’isola che ripeteva lunghe cantilene notte dopo notte accanto al fuoco (poi è arrivata la televisione!) Probabilmente la vecchina preferiva recitare la preghiera nel gaelico dei suoi padri invece del Padre Nostro della Chiesa cattolica! (continua)
All’apparenza una preghiera al Dio creatore ma  se al posto di  Rìgh na = “Re del” mettiamo una Rìghinn na = “Regina del” otteniamo la descrizione della Via Lattea

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbrough  canta solo la prima strofa in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) 

I
A Righ na gile (1)
A Righ na greine,
A Righ na rinne (2),
A Righ na reula,
A Righ na cruinne,
A Righ na speura (3),
Is aluinn do ghnuis,
A lub (4) eibhinn.
II
Da lub shioda
Shios rid’ leasraich
Mhinich, chraicich;
Usgannan buidhe
Agus dolach
As gach sath dhiubh


I
Thou King of the moon (1),
Thou King of the sun,
Thou King of the planets (2),
Thou King of the stars,
Thou King of the globe,
Thou King of the sky (3),
Oh! Lovely Thy countenance,
Thou beauteous Beam (4).
II
Two loops of silk
Down by thy limbs,
Smooth-skinned (5);
Yellow jeweIs
And a handful
Out of every stock of them (6).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tu re  della luna
tu re  del sole
tu re  della creazione,
tu re  delle stelle
tu re  della Terra
tu re  del Cielo
amabile il tuo volto
tu meraviglioso raggio
II
Due giri di seta
ti avvolgono i lombi
dalla pelle levigata;
gioielli dorati
e una ricca
paroure 

NOTE
E’ risaputo che  Carmichael si prese delle libertà nella traduzione del gaelico, così Tom Thomson (gaelico scozzese come lingua madre) trae delle considerazioni che riporto nelle note lasciandole in inglese
1) “na gile” (of the whiteness)  e in senso lato Luna
2) I can’t see how “na rinne” (singular) can mean “of the planets” (plural) – it’s clearly singular and means either “of the world” or perhaps “of creation” or even “of the universe”
3) “na speura” (of heaven)
4) A lùb: tra i vari significati  che il dizionario riporta non c’è “beam” ma un “young man” che potrebbe fare al caso nostro
5) una pelle serica, soffice e luminosa come le raffinate vesti indossate
6) ai celti piaceva molto la chincaglieria (d’oro massiccio naturalmente): s’intende un assortimento di bracciali, anelli, collane, orecchini e ciondoli, in italiano si direbbe “un vasto abbinamento di gioielleria” ma così si perde l’asciuttezza del verso gaelico. 

LA SAGA OUTLANDER

Per chi ama i romanzi storici romance Diana Gabaldon con la sua serie Outlander è ormai diventata un punto di riferimento. Il suo successo è ormai planetario e in Italia e non solo non si contano più i siti e i forum dedicati a questa autrice e ai meravigliosi personaggi da lei creati. La serie Outlander, ancora in corso di pubblicazione, è composta da 7 libri; la casa editrice Corbaccio nell’edizione italiana ha scelto di dividere i 7 libri in due (escluso “La Straniera”) e fin’ora ne sono stati pubblicati 13. La notorietà si è ulteriormente amplificata con la produzione e la messa in onda di una serie televisiva  dal titolo “Outlander”.

Il romanzo è anche una storia romantica dell’amore nato tra Claire Randall e James Fraser ovvero James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser Lord di Broch Tuarach e le loro peripezie per l’Europa e le Americhe. La vicenda storica è calata nella Scozia della metà del 700 dilaniata dalle lotte giacobite e dai conflitti tra i clan, accuratamente ricreata dalla Gabaldon, attraverso le tradizioni e la vita del popolo scozzese, in uno stile ricco ed evocativo, mai lento o noioso.

IL CERCHIO DI PIETRE: IL PORTARE PER IL VIAGGIO NEL TEMPO

L’avvio della storia è apparentemente un po’ “sopra le righe”, con un viaggio nel tempo della protagonista che, in viaggio di nozze ad Inverness, si ritrova proiettata nel passato, dopo aver attraversato il cerchio di pietra di Craigh na Dun: dal 1945 nel 1743.
Il tema della Danza dei Druidi ribattezzato “Stones Theme” ritorna spesso nella versione della serie televisiva legato al mistero dei Cerchi di Pietre e ai rituali praticati nell’antica religione.

continua seconda parte

I BARDI DELLE TERRE CELTICHE

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/megalitismo.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/religione-celti.html?cb=1521975648601

http://www.carmichaelwatson.lib.ed.ac.uk/cwatson/en/catalogueentry/2126
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/corpus/Carmina/G9.html
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/archive/75760440?mode=transcription

ORA NAM BUADH THE INVOCATION OF THE GRACES

“L’invocazione delle grazie” è una preghiera in gaelico scozzese tradotta da Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica: hymns and incantations” (1900), ricomposta unendo una serie di versioni e frammenti. “I heard versions of this poem in other islands and in districts of the mainland, and in November 1888 John Gregorson Campbell, minister of Tiree, sent me a fragment taken down from Margaret Macdonald, Tiree. The poem must therefore have been widely known. in Tiree the poem was addressed to boys and girls, in Uist to young men and maidens. Probably it was composed to a maiden on her marriage”(traduzione italiano tratta da qui): “Io ho udito versioni di questo poema in altre isole e distretti del Continente e nel novembre 1888 John Gregorson Campbell, ministro di Tiree, me ne ha inviato un frammento preso da Margaret Macdonald, di Tiree. Il poema deve essere perciò largamente noto. In Tiree era indirizzato a ragazzi e ragazze, nel Uist a giovani uomini e donne. Probabilmente venne composto per una fanciulla il giorno del suo matrimonio“.

LE GRAZIE DELLA SPOSA

Si suppone quindi che l’invocazione sia rivolta alla dea Bride affinchè imprima le nove “grazie” sulla novella sposa. Le grazie invocate nella preghiera sono delle virtù, ossia delle qualità positive fisiche o spirituali, la traduzione “graces” è di Carmichael perchè buadh significa più propriamente ” faculty, talent, virtue“.

Nel primo verso dell’incantesimo o preghiera si descrive un rito di purificazione in cui l’adepta si bagna le mani in una bevanda preparata con vino, acqua, succo di frutti di bosco, latte e miele, ma simbolicamente si tratta di una lustrazione con l'”acqua di fuoco” che contiene i sette elementi della creazione e della conoscenza iniziatica o segreta.


I bathe thy palms
In showers of wine(1),
In the lustral fire,(2)
In the seven elements,(3)
In the juice of the rasps(4),
In the milk of honey(5),
And I place the nine pure choice graces
In thy fair fond face…
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Bagno i tuoi palmi
con gocce di vino
nel fuoco lustrale
nei sette elementi
nel succo delle bacche
nel latte-miele
e imprimo il puro segno delle nove grazie
sul tuo viso amabile e bello

NOTE
1) tradotto dal gaelico Frasa fiona = A fras si traduce in inglese come “rain shower or scattering of water”.
2) la traduzione di Carmichael è impropria infatti il termine gaelico “liu nan lasa” si traduce come“water of the fire.” Il pozzo della Conoscenza ai piedi dell’albero della vita contiene questa “fiery water“, un’acqua benedetta o sacra, un’acqua termale che viene dal grembo della Madre. In genere l’acqua magica o lustrale è quella di rugiada raccolta all’alba (tra il novilunio e il primo quarto di luna) nella quale sia stato gettato un tizzone ardente che va a spegnersi nell’acqua.
Nel Cristianesimo l’unione dell’acqua con il vino è il simbolo dell’unione del divino e dell’umano, l’acqua e il sangue del Cristo crocefisso. Nella chiesa bizantina l’acqua aggiunta al vino è calda per simboleggiare la discesa dello Spirito Santo.
3) Il numero sette rappresenta un po’ in tutte le culture del passato un ciclo  compiuto e perfetto, formato dalla triade sacra e i quattro elementi costitutivi del mondo sensibile che quindi racchiude il divino e l’umano, spirito di ogni cosa. In questo contesto sono gli elementi costitutivi della donna in quanto essere umano: la terra = la carne, l’acqua= il sangue, il sole= il volto ossia gli occhi, le nuvole= la mente, il vento= il respiro, le pietre= ossa. Tuttavia per “seachd siona“, il dizionario “Am Faclair Beag” elenca fuoco, aria, terra, acqua, ghiaccio, vento e folgore
4) Subh-Craobh è più propriamente un cespuglio di lamponi, ovvero un più generico “frutti del bosco” quindi anche more o mirtilli
5) la parola in gaelico è  bainne meala = honey milk viene da pensare all’idromele, la bevanda che induce alle visioni ovvero l’ambrosia degli Dei.
L’idromele era una bevanda sacra inizialmente riservata solo ai sacerdoti e alle quattro cerimonie dei fuochi (Imbolc, Beltane, Lugnasad,Samonios), perchè si riteneva che il miele fosse un cibo divino dono degli Dei che cadeva dal cielo sotto forma di pulviscolo; Virgilio lo diceva “dono della rugiada” che si depositava sui fiori e veniva raccolto dalle api. Per i popoli nordici l’idromele è la bevanda dell’Altro Mondo, simbolo dell’immortalità con essa si segnavano i riti di passaggio della vita: nascita, matrimonio e morte. (continua)

L’INVOCAZIONE ALLE DEE

Si passa poi all’invocazione vera e propria in cui sono chiamati gli otto poteri che fanno capo a otto rispettive dee o donne famose, e che è il passo di più difficile comprensione, soprattutto perchè vengono citati dei personaggi o divinità non immediatamente riconducibili a quanto già conosciuto sulla mitologia celtica. Se la traduzione che Carmichael fa delle parole in gaelico sono frutto di una concezione vittoriana di quelle che dovrebbero essere le virtù femminili, dalle parole in gaelico emerge invece una donna più audace e fiera, specialmente in questa parte per analogia con i personaggi chiamati in causa.


Thine is the skill(9) of the Fairy Woman,
Thine is the virtue of Bride the calm(10),
Thine is the faith of Mary the mild,
Thine is the tact(11) of the woman of Greece,
Thine is the beauty(12) of Emir the lovely,
Thine is the tenderness(13) of Darthula delightful,
Thine is the courage(14) of Maebh the strong,
Thine is the charm of Binne-bheul (15).
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Tuo è potere (9) della
Donna Fatata
tua la virtù di
Bride la calma (10)
tua è la fede di Bride la mite
tue le gesta (11) della
donna greca
tua l’eleganza (12) di
Emir la bella
tuo è il carattere (13) dell’incantevole Darthula,
tua l’audacia (14) di Maebh la forte
tuo il fascino di Binne-bella (15)

NOTE
9) la parola gleus  nel dizionario Am Faclair Beag è definita come “a condition, a state of being, a mood or humor, the workings of a machine, or a musical key”.  Il termine corrisponde più al concetto di potere che di abilità: incanto, malia della fata creatura che dona l’ispirazione poetica e la vita eterna ma anche che seduce i mortali conducendoli alla morte. La “Queen of Faerie” delle ballate scozzesi è “La Belle Dame sans Merci” di Keats
10) bithe= “peaceful”, “tranquil.” (dizionario Am Faclair Beag,) un termine che equivale alla condizione femminile. Bride è la Sposa per antonomasia, la dea pan-celtica sulla quale si è scritto di tutto e di più (continua)
11) gniomh=  deed or task, quindi la traduzione di Carmichael come “tatto” è impropria. William Sharp suggerisce che la donna greca in questione sia Elena di Troia
12) sgeimh= elegance. Emir era la moglie dell’eroe irlandese Cuchulain
13) mèinneach = mercy, pity, discreetness or fondness. Darthula, figlia del cielo Dearshul. Sharp ritiene si tratti di Deirdre la tragica eroina di “The Sons of Uisneach.” Il termine mèin non è tuttavia chiaro più probabilmente sta a indicare un temperamento o un carattere
14) mean (meanmna)= courage, boldness, spirit, pride or joy.  La regina Maebh del Connacht irlandese: una donna dal carattere forte e implacabile, figura chiave del ciclo dell’Ulster il cui nome è sinonimo di idromele.
15) per quanto in molti si siano sforzati di identificare questa Binne-bheul nessuno ha mai proposto una soluzione convincente

LE BENEDIZIONI

L’invocazione prosegue poi con una serie di 8 benedizioni che esprimono un’unica virtù: quella di saper alleviare le altrui sofferenze (ovvero quelle del marito) fornendo conforto, rifugio, orientamento, appoggio, ristoro e guarigione.
Una parte centrale detiene infine questa strofa che richiama gli antichi componimenti dei bardi (parole che ogni donna vorrebbe sentirsi sussurrare dal suo innamorato..)


You are the joy of all joyous things,
the light of the beam of the sun
Thou art the door of the chief of hospitality(16),
Thou art the surpassing star of guidance(17),
You are the step of the deer of the hill,
the step of the steed of the plain (18)
the grace(19) of swan of swimming
You are the loveliness(20) of all lovely desires(21),
the loveliest likeness that was
upon earth
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sei tu la gioia d’ogni gioia,
la luce del raggio di sole
tu sei la porta aperta
per l’ospite (16)
sei la stella polare
che guida (17)
Tu sei il passo del daino sul monte,
il passo del cavallo nel prato (18)
sei la grazia (19) del cigno che nuota,
la delizia(20) dei desideri(21)
più dolci
la più amabile bellezza che ci sia
sulla terra

NOTE
16) la traduzione letterale= tu sei la porta del capo dell’ospitalità, si tratta della consuetudine celtica di accogliere sempre con ospitalità chiunque arrivi fino alla propria porta di casa. L’usanza deriva dalla magnanimità del capo villaggio che per mostrare la propria potenza lasciava aperte le porte della casa ovvero dava cibo e bevande con liberalità a chiunque entrasse per rifocillarsi.
17) reul-iuil Bride =“guiding star of Brighid” il cuore luminoso dell’effige bambolina della dea che le donne preparavano per Imbolc, tradotto variamente in termini di stella (del  mattino, stella polare o stella cometa)
18) la parola gaelica è blar= field, plain ma è anche un termine che indica un campo di battaglia
19) seimh = calmness, gentleness, mildness, kindness.
20) ailleagan= a little jewel or treasure
21) rùn= a mystery or a secret, When used in phrases such asmo rùn (“my love”) it means “love.”la frase diventa quindi “thou art the little jewel of the mystery of love.” (sei la perla del misterioso amore)

THE INVOCATIONS OF THE GRACES

E infine ecco la versione messa in musica dal gruppo Alice Castle, una versione “ridotta” con l’inserimento di un coro “dedicato alla sposa”

ASCOLTA Alice Castle live

VERSIONE ALICE CASTE
I
I bathe thy palms
In showers of wine
In the lustral fire
In the seven elements
In the juice of the rasps
In the milk of honey
And I place the pure choice graces
II
In thy fair fond face
The grace of form
The grace of voice
The grace of fortune
The grace of goodness
The grace of wisdom
The grace of whole-souled loveliness
CHORUS
You are the joy of all joyous things,
the light of the beam of the sun
You are the step of the deer of the hill,
the step of the steed of the plain
You are the surpassing star of guidance,
the grace of swan of swimming
You are the loveliness of all lovely desires,
the loveliest likeness that was
upon earth
III
A shade are you in the heat
A shelter are you in the cold
Eyes are you to the blind
A staff are you to the pilgrim
An island are you at the sea
A well are you in the desert
Health are you to the ailing
IV
The best hour of the day be thine,
the best day of week be thine,
The best week of the year be thine,
the best time of the life be thine
The life be thine.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Bagno i tuoi palmi
con gocce di vino (1)
nel fuoco lustrale (2)
nei sette elementi (3)
nel succo dei lamponi (4)
nel latte-miele (5)
e imprimo il puro segno delle grazie
II
Sul tuo viso amabile e bello
la grazia della forma,
la grazia della voce,
la grazia della fortuna, (6)
La grazia della bontà,
la grazia della saggezza,
la grazia d’amare con l’anima tutta,
CORO
Sei tu la gioia d’ogni gioia,
la luce del raggio di sole
Tu sei il passo del daino sul monte,
il passo del cavallo nel prato (18),
sei la stella polare (17)
che guida

sei la grazia del cigno che nuota,
la delizia dei desideri
più dolci

la più amabile bellezza che ci sia
sulla terra
III
Tu sei l’ombra per la calura
un riparo sei dal freddo
gli occhi tu sei per il cieco
il bastone per il viandante
un’isola tu sei nel mare (7)
un pozzo nel deserto
la salute per il malato
IV
Che la migliore ora del giorno sia tua
il migliore giorno della settimana sia tuo
la migliore settimana dell’anno sia tua
il momento migliore della vita sia tuo
che la vita sia tua (22).

NOTE
6) non è l’augurio di buona sorte, bensì è il dono di comprendere la transitorietà delle cose perchè la fortuna è una ruota e quindi non si ferma mai
7) l’isola nel mare è l’approdo sicuro nel mare della vita
17) reul-iuil Bride=“guiding star of Brighid” si tratta più propriamente della stella polare, una conchiglia o un cristallo che diventa il cuore della bambolina effigie della dea nel rituale di Imbolc. Dopo il cristianesimo il concetto viene associato alla stella cometa che secondo la tradizione comparve in cielo per annunciare la nascita di Gesù
22) l’ultimo verso è stato aggiunto per dare un senso di circolarità del tempo

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg1/cg1006.htm
http://www.faclair.info/
http://incantisegreti.blogspot.it/2013/07/ora-nam-buadh-l-invocazione-delle-grazie.html
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2013/06/loop-of-brighid-invocation-of-the-graces-a-brigidine-sacred-text-part-1/
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2013/07/invocation-of-the-graces-a-brigidine-sacred-text-part-2/
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/agora/2013/08/loop-of-brighid-invocation-of-the-graces-a-brigidine-sacred-text-part-5/

CRODH CHAILEIN

Adriaen_van_de_VeldeNell’economia rurale di un tempo mungere le mucche (come anche la preparazione del burro e del formaggio) era un’incombenza svolta dalle donne. Così la saggezza delle donne celte ha originato tutta una serie di canti di lavoro, che sono anche incantesimi  per far allontanare il malocchio e per calmare le mucche, in modo che la produzione del latte sia abbondante e benedetta. E’ risaputo che i folletti sono ghiotti di burro e di latte, e nel folklore si annoverano anche streghe e inquietanti animali come succhiatori di latte dalle intenzioni ostili, o determinati a far inacidire il latte, o a impedire la trasformazione della panna in burro!

I SIMBOLI DELLA DEA

La figura di una fanciulla che munge una mucca si ritrova scolpita sulle mura di molte chiese medievali, ed è una presenza molto antica in terra d’Irlanda, o più in generale lungo le coste d’ Europa: già nel megalitismo si trovano nomi come  The Cow and Calf attribuiti a particolari rocce. continua

MILKING SONG

Nel mondo contadino esistevano tutta una serie di preghiere e invocazioni, spesso in forma di canzoni, che facevano parte del bagaglio culturale risalente al tempo dei Druidi; questi Ortha nan Gaidheal, i Canti dei Gael ovviamente in gaelico scozzese, provengono dalla tradizione bardica sopravvissuta nella tradizione orale di un popolo, attraverso i secoli del Cristianesimo e nonostante l’egemonia culturale inglese, e sono stati raccolti e tradotti alla fine del 1800 da Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912), che li pubblicò nel suo libro “Carmina Gadelica”.

Crodh Chailein“, in inglese “Colin’s cattle”,  ( è classificata come una “milking song” e registrata sul campo da Alan Lomax  (South Uist)  negli anni 1950. E’ una milking song cioè una ninna-nanna sussurrata alle mucche per tenerle tranquille durante la mungitura, e per stimolarle magicamente nella produzione di tanto latte. Le mucche scozzesi sono così abituate a questo trattamento che non danno il latte se non le si canta una canzone!!
Ascoltiamo durante la mungitura tre canti in sequenza: “Crodh Chailein”, “Chiùinan Ghràidh” e “a’ Bhanarach Chiùin”

Ethel Bassin nel suo “The Old Songs of Skye: Frances Tolmie and her Circle” (1997) riporta due versi della canzone raccolta da Isabel Cameron dell’isola di Mull (Ebridi interne) insieme alla leggenda dell’origine della canzone riportata da Niall MacLeòid, “the Skye bard.”
Chi canta è la donna rapita dalle fate nel giorno delle sue nozze e costretta a rimanere nel loro regno per un anno e un giorno; e tuttavia ottiene il permesso di recarsi quotidianamente nella sua casa da sposata per mungere le mucche del marito di nome Colin: il marito può sentire il suo canto ma non riesce a vederla. Il bardo ci assicura che allo scadere del tempo la donna ritornerà dal marito umano! Il rapimento della sposa nel giorno delle sue nozze era una possibilità non poi così remota secondo le credenze del tempo e molti erano gli accorgimenti del giorno per tenere alla larga le fate! (continua).

Mary Mackellar scrive nel suo saggio ‘The Shieling: Its Traditions and Songs’ (Gaelic Society of Inverness 1889 qui) “Weird women of the fairy race were said to milk the deer on the mountain tops, charming them with songs composed to a fairy melody or “fonn-sith.”  One of these songs is said to be the famous “Crodh Chailein.”  I give the version I heard of it, and all the old people said the deer were the cows referred to as giving their milk so freely under the spell of enchantment. .. Highland cows are considered to have more character than the Lowland breeds, and when they get irritated or disappointed, they retain their milk for days.  This sweet melody sung – not by a stranger, but by the loving lips of her usual milkmaid – often soothes her into yielding her precious addition to the family supply.”

ASCOLTA così come raccolta sul campo nel 1968 sull’isola di Tiree (Ebridi interne)

ASCOLTA Between the Times “Crodh Chailein” testo in gaelico (tradotto in inglese) e spartito ne “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript” (1812) probabilmente il più vecchio spartito della melodia collezionato al numero 1 (pag 81)
ASCOLTA Fuaran

GAELICO SCOZZESE (qui)
Seist (chorus)
Crodh Chailein mo chridhe
Crodh chailein mo ghaoil
Gu’n tugadh crodh Chailein
Dhomh bainn’ air an fhraoch
Gu’n tugadh crodh Chailein
Dhomh bainn’ air an raon
Gun chuman(1), gun bhuarach
Gun luaircean(2), gun laugh.
Gu’n tugadh crodh Chailein
Dhomh bainne gu leoir
Air mullach a’ mhonaidh
Gun duine ‘nar coir
Gu bheil sac air mo chridhe
’S tric snidh air mo ghruaidh
agus smuairean air m’aligne
Chum an cadal so bhuam
Cha chaidil, cha chaidil
cha chaidil mi uair
cha chaidil mi idir
gus an tig na bheil uam.
VERSIONE DI MARY MACKELLAR
Chrodh Chailein, mo chridhe,
Crodh Iain, mo ghaoil,
Gun tugadh crodh Chailein,
Am bainn’ air an fhraoch.
Gun chuman, gun bhuarach,
Gun lao’-cionn, gun laogh,
Gun ni air an domhan,
Ach monadh fodh fhraoch.
Crodh riabhach breac ballach,
Air dhath nan cearc-fraoicb,
Crodh ‘lionadh nan gogan
‘S a thogail nan laogh.
Fo ‘n dluth-bharrach uaine,
‘S mu fhuarain an raoin,
Gun tugadh crodh Chailein
Dhomh ‘m bainn’ air an fhraoch.
Crodh Chailein, mo chridhe,
‘S crodh Iain, mo ghaoil,
Gu h-uallach ‘s an eadar-thrath,
A beadradh ri ‘n laoigh
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
The cattle of Colin my dearest,
The cattle of Colin my love,
Colin’s cattle would give me milk
Upon the heather
Colin’s cattle would give me milk
Upon the field,
without a cogue(1), without a shackle,
without a luaircean(2), without a calf.
Colin’s cattle would give
plenty of milk to me,
on top of the moor
without anyone near us.
There is a weigh on my dart,
and often tears on my cheek,
And sorrow on my mind
That has kept sleep from me.
I will not sleep, I will not sleep,
I will not sleep an hour,
I will not sleep at all
until what I long for returns.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Le mucche di Colin, l’amore mio,
Le mucche di Colin, l’amore mio,
Le mucche di Colin daranno il latte
nella brughiera.
Le mucche di Colin daranno il latte
nel campo
senza bisogno di secchio, pastoie,
finto-vitello e vitello.
Le mucche di Colin daranno
per me un mucchio di latte
in cima alla brughiera
senza nessuno a starci intorno.
C’è un peso sul mio cuore
e spesso lacrime sulle mie gote
e sofferenza nella mia mente
che non mi lascia dormire.
Non dormirò,
nemmeno un’ora,
non dormirò affatto
finchè colui che amo non riavrò

NOTE
1) cogue = wooden vessel used for milking cows
2) luaircean = a substitute calf, an inanimate prop over which the skin of a milk cow’s deceased calf was draped, in order to console her with it’s scent, thus encouraging her to continue to produce milk

e siccome siamo nelle Highlands è inevitabile l’arrangiamento della melodia per cornamusa

continua

FONTI
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/literatures-languages-cultures/celtic-scottish-studies/research-publications/publications/staff-pubs http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.apjpublications.co.uk/skye/poetry/collect21.htm http://scotsgaelicsong.wordpress.com/2014/03/18/scots-gaelic-song-crodh-chailein/ http://www.ed.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.100544!/fileManager/RossMS.pdf http://plover.net/~agarvin/faerie/Text/Music/54.html

THE WIFE OF USHER’S WELL

“La moglie del pozzo di Usher” è una ballata che parla di revenants ed è stata collezionata dal professor Child al #79: tre fratelli sono stati mandati dalla madre per mare e muoiono in un naufragio. Appresa la notizia la madre si dispera, maledice il vento e il mare e vorrebbe riavere i figli “in earthly flesh and blood“, (in carne e ossa). Nella notte di San Martino i tre figli ritornano a casa e stanno con lei solo per quella notte, perchè dovranno ritornare nel Mondo dei Morti non appena spunta l’alba. Mentre Child riporta solo tre versioni testuali, Bertrand H. Bronson nel suo “Traditional tunes of the Child ballads” (1959) ha rintracciato 58 melodie provenienti dall’Inghilterra e dagli Stati Uniti.

Alcuni commentano la ballata affermando che la donna era una vecchia strega che, facendo ricorso alla magia, aveva riportato indietro dal regno dei morti i suoi figli in carne e ossa (morti viventi); ma questa interpretazione non tiene in debito conto due fattori: i canti tradizionali che vanno sotto il nome di Sea Invocation songs e il culto dei morti nella tradizione celtica.

278

SEA SPELL

C’è una lunga tradizione di lamenti o incantesimi delle donne rivolte al mare: le donne dei pescatori rimaste a casa in attesa del ritorno dei loro mariti, figli, padri hanno elaborato una sorta di rituale collettivo – preghiera al mare che, nelle tristi occorrenze, diventava anche un lamento funebre. In questi canti c’è tutta l’antica forza che si attribuiva un tempo alle parole, la magia delle parole che si traduceva in suono e musica, così la forza degli elementi era imbrigliata e ricondotta alla volontà di un singolo (o dalla ancor più potente volontà di un coro di “sorelle”). Alcuni di questi antichi canti sono giunti fino a noi purtroppo in forma frammentaria e per lo più da remote isole semi-abbandonate spazzate dai venti e soggette ai capricci del mare (ad esempio “Geay Jeh’n Aer” dall’Isola di Man qui o “The Unst Boat Song” dalle Isole Shetland qui).

Un grande lavoro di raccolta è stato operato dallo studioso Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) che nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (qui) pubblicò quello che rimaneva della spiritualità e della tradizione celtica nelle Highlands.

SAMAHIN E IL CULTO DEGLI ANTENATI

I Celti non temevano la morte e i morti e credevano che essi ritornassero sulla terra in particolari momenti dell’anno: così alla festa di Samahin i vivi accoglievano i loro antenati e discendenti accendendo falò e fuochi e preparando del cibo e delle bevande per loro. L’antica usanza si è consolidata in molte tradizioni d’Europa ed era ancora una consuetudine contadina negli anni del secondo dopoguerra. Ormai della Festa dei Morti è rimasto il giro al cimitero per portare i fiori freschi sulle tombe (o sfoggiare il bouquet più bello) e la carnevalata di Halloween: una volta si lasciavano sulla tavola o alle finestre pane, patate o ceci bolliti, castagne lesse o arrostite, oppure la “minestra dei morti” (riso o orzo cotto nel latte) ma anche vino e sidro, latte o semplicemente l’acqua; le donne preparavano dei dolci speciali detti pan, ossa o fave dei morti per i bambini e i soulers i questuanti che andavano di casa in casa (continua). Il defunto ritornava in vita anche se solo per una notte, quella più magica dell’anno e veniva ringraziato e imbonito con delle offerte!

I nostri morti sono l’humus della terra in senso materiale e spirituale. Scrive la Bonnet: “Nelle società tradizionali, la ricchezza, la vita simbolizzata dall’imperativo “Crescete e moltiplicatevi” è dovuta ai morti. Questi defunti non hanno più una funzione evidente nella società dei visibili, poichè sono la controparte non visibile della forza vitale. I morti, i geni tutelari, vivono nelle viscere della terra, considerata come “nostra madre universale”. (J. Bonnet La terra delle donne e le sue magie, 1991) E’ come dire che sono i morti che nutrono i vivi, una verità sacrosanta perchè nulla muore mai veramente ma concorre al ciclo vita-morte-vita.

PRIMA VERSIONE

La ballata venne pubblicata per la prima volta da Sir Walter Scott (in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border ed 1802), così come l’aveva sentita cantare da una vecchia di Kirkhill, (West Lothian, Broxburn)

Il narratore inizia a raccontare (con il tipico andamento delle ballate) la storia avvisando gli ascoltatori circa i personaggi coinvolti, la moglie del Pozzo di Usher e i suoi tre figli; i due testi presi in esame sono molto simili ed entrambi pieni di termini scozzesi, ma nel primo (Karine Polwart) ci avverte subito che la morte si è presa i tre ragazzi, nel secondo il narratore è meno esplicito. Così dopo la maledizione (o l’incantesimo) al mare (ci immaginiamo la donna che di fronte al mare si mette a cantare in gaelico una delle tante invocazioni tramandate di generazione in generazione da madre a figlia) si passa senza soluzione di continuità alla notte di San Martino quando i tre ragazzi ritornano a casa: da qui l’interpretazione che la vecchia (intesa come strega) abbia riportato in vita i figli. Più che un gesto negromantico a mio avviso è stato il dolore inconsolabile della vecchia madre per la perdita dei figli a riportali a casa, proprio nella magica notte di Samahin, il capodanno celtico.

C’è decisamente il gusto gotico per il macabro, temi cari all’ottocento come il sepolcro lacrimato e le apparizioni di fantasmi o di anime dannate in cerca di vendetta.

REVENANTS

In francese la parola revenant conserva un duplice significato quello primario è di «anima che torna dall’altro mondo sotto un’apparenza fisica», l’altro è «fantasma» «apparizione di un morto». Possiedono quindi una duplice natura e si presentano come entità corporee (con le stesse sembianze che avevano in vita o anche di qualche animale o sotto forma di scheletri) oppure incorporee come fantasmi.

Nel folklore europeo i revenats sono anime che mantengono la loro forma materiale, la personalità e i sentimenti di quando erano in vita. E’ una concezione materiale delle anime dei morti che si manifesta nelle credenze e usanze funerarie di buona parte d’Europa. I revenants sono per lo più anime in pena, compresi quanti son deceduti di morte violenta o accidentale (assassinati, annegati…) o richiamate dall’affetto dei vivi che li piangono troppo. In alcune tradizioni tuttavia i revenants sono anime dannate come i vampiri e i non-morti ovvero schiere infernali e demoniache.

ASCOLTA Karine Polwart in “Fairest Floo’er“, 2007
I
There lived a wife at Usher’s Well(1) And a wealthy wife was she She had three stout and stalwart sons And she sent them o’er the sea
II
Well, they hadna been a month frae her Not one month and a day When cauld(3), cauld death come o’er the land And he stole those boys away
III
She said, “I wish the wind would never mair blaw Nor fish swim in the flood ‘Til my three boys come hame tae me In earthly flesh and blood In earthly flesh and blood
IV
Well, it fell aboot the Martinmas time(7) When the nichts are lang(8) and mirk(9) The carlin(4) wife’s three boys come hame(9) And their hats were o’ the birk (11)
V
That neither grew in any wood Nor down by any wall But at the gates o’ paradise Aye, the birken tree grew tall…VII
Well, she has laid the table braid Wi’ bread and blood-red wine “Come eat and drink, my bonnie boys Come eat and drink o’ mine”
VIII
“Oh mither, bread we cannae eat Nor can we drink the wine For cauld, cauld death is lord of all And to him we must resign
IX(14)
For the green, green grass is at oor heads And the clay is at oor feet And how your tears come tumbling down To wet the winding sheet To wet the winding sheet”
X
Well, she has made the bed full braid She’s made it lang and deep She’s laid it all wi’ golden thread And she’s lulled those boys tae sleep
XI
Well, the cock, he hadna crowed but once Tae welcome in the day When the eldest tae the youngest says “Brother, we must away”…

XIII
For the cock does craw, the day does daw(15) And the chunnerin(16) worm does chide And if we’re missed out o’ oor place Then a sair(17) pain we maun bide(18)

ASCOLTA The Hare and the Moon
Versione “The Oxford Book of Enghlish Verse” (1900 Arthur Quiller-Couch e successive edizioni)I
There lived a wife at Usher’s Well(1), And a wealthy wife was she; She had three stout and stalwart sons, And sent them over the sea.
II
They hadna been a week from her, A week but barely ane(2), Whan word came to the carline(4) wife, That her three sons were gane.
III
I wish the wind may never cease, Nor fashes(5) in the flood(6), Till my three sons come hame to me, In earthly flesh and blood.”
IV
It befell about the Martinmass(7), When nights are long and mirk,(9) The carlin wife’s three sons came hame,(10) And their hats were o the birk.(11)
V
It neither grew in syke(12) nor ditch, Nor yet in ony sheugh;(13) But at the gates o Paradise, That birk grew fair enough
VI
“Blow up the fire my maidens, Bring water from the well; For a’ my house shall feast this night, Since my three sons are well.” …

X
And she has made to them a bed, She’s made it large and wide, And she’s taen her mantle her about, Sat down at the bed-side.
XI
Up then crew the red, red, cock, And up the crew the gray; The eldest to the youngest said, ‘Tis time we were away.
XII
The cock he hadna crawed but once, And clappd his wings at a’, When the youngest to the eldest said, Brother, we must awa.
XIII
The cock doth craw, the day both daw(15), The cahannerin(16) worm doth chide; Gin we be mist out o our place, A sair(17) pain we maun bide.(18)
XIV(19) ‘Lie still, lie still but a little wee while, Lie still but if we may; Gin my mother should miss us when she wakes, She’ll go mad ere it be day.’
XV
“Fare ye weel, my mother dear! Fareweel to barn and byre!(20) And fare ye weel, the bonny lass That kindles my mother’s fire!”

 

NOTE
1) usher’s well= non corrisponde a una località precisamente individuabile, alcuni vedono nel pozzo la prefigurazione di un passaggio tra la terra dei viventi e la terra dei morti, una sorta di calderone magico
2) ane=one
3) could= cold, tuttavia in italiano l’espressione più usata è morte crudele (nel senso di insensibile e quindi priva di sentimenti= fredda)
4) carline=old woman; ma anche nel senso di “old hag”. Anche il termine “wife” è da intendere nel significato di “old woman”
5) la vecchia lancia un incantesimo o manda una maledizione al mare affinchè nessun altra nave possa più fare naufragio: così ordina al vento di non soffiare più e al mare di non agitarsi più; alcuni trasformano l’originario fashes o flashes (tumults, troubles, storms) in fishes di modo che la frase diventa “né pesci nuotare nel mare” frase che conserva comunque il suo significato nel contesto e anzi ci dice qualcosa di più sul motivo per cui i suoi ragazzi erano andati per mare: come pescatori
6) flood = sea
7) Martinmas=11 novembre è la festa di San Martino. Una volta quando il computo del tempo si faceva su base lunare la celebrazione di Samahin oscillava da fine ottobre e per tutta la cosiddetta “estate di San Martino“. Tanto durava il Capodanno celtico così a San Martino si chiude l’annata agricola e se ne apre un’altra: si pagano (si rinnovano o si concludono) i contratti d’affitto, e si fanno i traslochi se bisogna lasciare la casa avuta in mezzadria o il lavoro non più rinnovato.
8) Lang= long
9) mirk=dark
10) hame= home
11) birk = birch. La betulla è cresciuta presso le porte del paradiso e allude alla sepoltura (anche se tecnicamente i fratelli sono morti annegati e quindi morti insepolti)
12) syke = trench ms anche brook
13) sheugh = furrow ma anche ditch. Si riferisce ad un ambiente coltivato e recintato come un orto o giardino oppure all’argine di un fossato
14) la strofa non è presente nel “The Oxford Book of Enghlish Verse” e nemmeno nei testi riportati dal professor Child, fa parte invece delle seconda versione “all’americana”, probabilmente ha citato la strofa in Joan Baez
15) daw = dawn. Il canto del gallo avvisa che il sole sta per sorgere, la magica notte di Samahin è finita e i revenants devono ritornare nel loro mondo
16) channerin = grumbling, gnawing; l’immagine dei vermi che brontolano è piuttosto buffa
17) sair= sore, A sair pain we maun bide: We must expect sore pain. Si dice che se il revenant non ritorna nell’Altro Mondo lo attende una grande pena. Il concetto è passato ovviamente sotto la visione cattolica del mondo dei morti: i revenants non sono delle anime dannate quanto piuttosto delle anime penitenti ovvero anime del purgatorio che devono scontare una pena (che sarà più lunga o peggiore se non rientrano sottoterra al canto del gallo) Sono tuttavia delle anime buone che hanno conservato il desiderio di ritornare al loro ambiente famigliare o costrette a tornare per portare a termine qualcosa di incompiuto durante la vita o per chiedere dei suffragi.
18) maun bide = must endure.
19) questa strofa de “The Oxford Book of Enghlish Verse” è omessa dai The Hare and the Moon
20) byre = cow shed

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO (unendo tutti le strofe da I a XV)

Una vecchia viveva al Pozzo di Usher ed era ricca e aveva tre figli forti e valorosi e li mandò per mare. Non era nemmeno passato un mese (una settimana) che la morte crudele passò sulla terra e li portò via (quando arrivò voce alla vecchia che i suoi tre figli erano andati). Lei disse “Vorrei che il vento non potesse più soffiare e nessun pesce nuotare nel mare (e che il mare non potesse più agitarsi) fino a quando i miei tre ragazzi non ritorneranno da me in carne e ossa”.

usherVenne il tempo di San Martino quando le notti sono lunghe e nere e i ragazzi della vecchia ritornarono a casa e i loro cappelli erano di betulla. La betulla non crebbe in un bosco e nemmeno accanto alle mura (di un castello) ma alle porte del paradiso e crebbe alta. “Alzate la fiamma mie ancelle e portate l’acqua dal pozzo, perchè tutta la mia casa farà festa questa notte che i miei tre figli stanno bene”. Allora mise la tovaglia e il pane e il vino rosso come sangue “Venite a mangiare e a bere miei bei ragazzi, venite a mangiare e a bere con me” “O madre, non possiamo mangiare pane né bere vino, perchè la fredda morte è signora di tutto e a lei ci dobbiamo sottomettere”. “Abbiamo l’erba verde sulle nostre teste e la terra ai nostri piedi e come le tue lacrime cadono giù vanno a bagnare il sudario” Lei ha preparato il letto l’ha fatto in lungo e in largo e si avvolse in uno scialle dorata (mantello) e cullò quei ragazzi per farli dormire (e si sedette al fianco del letto).

Poi il gallo non cantò che una volta per salutare il giorno (Cantò il gallo rosso e poi il gallo grigio) quando il più grande disse al più giovane “Fratello dobbiamo andare” Il gallo non cantò che una volta e sbattè le sue ali insieme quando il più giovane disse al più vecchio “Fratello dobbiamo andare” “il gallo canta e l’alba è vicina è il verme si lamenta e se non ritorniamo al nostro posto dovremo aspettarci un grande dolore”. “Restiamo ancora, restiamo ancora per un momento, restiamo ancora un poco se possiamo, se la mamma non ci trovasse quando si sveglia sul far del giorno potrebbe impazzire” “Addio madre cara! Addio al fienile e alla stalla! E addio a te bella ragazza che accendete il fuoco di mia madre”

FONTI
http://alungkama.blogspot.it/2011/04/paraphare-of-wife-of-ushers-wife.html
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/ ~usher/ushersct/html/ushers_well.htm http://walterscott.eu/education/files/2013/02/Interpretative-Notes-to-The-Wife-of-Ushers-Well.pdf http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thewifeofusherswell.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20497 http://www.barbelith.com/topic/11088

continua seconda parte

Alan dai capelli neri

Read the post in English

Aileen Duinn, un canto, in gaelico scozzese, originario delle Isole Ebridi : un lament per il naufragio di una barca di pescatori, in origine una waulking song  in cui la donna invoca la morte per condividere lo stesso letto d’alghe del suo amore, Alan dai capelli neri. Secondo la tradizione sull’isola di Lewis è stata Annie Campbell ad aver scritto la canzone nella disperazione per la morte del suo fidanzato Alan Morrison, il capitano della nave che nella primavera del 1788 lasciò Stornoway per andare a Scalpay dove avrebbe dovuto sposarsi con la sua Annie, ma la nave incappò in una tempesta ed fece naufragio e l’intero equipaggio affogò: anche lei morirà qualche mese più tardi, sconvolta dal dolore. Il suo corpo è stato trovato sulla spiaggia, nei pressi del punto in cui il mare aveva riconsegnato il corpo di Ailein Duinn (Alan dai capelli neri).

La canzone è diventata famosa perché inserita nella colonna sonora del film Rob Roy e interpretata magistralmente da Karen Matheson (la cantante del gruppo scozzese i Capercaillie che compare nei panni di una popolana e la canta vicino al fuoco accompagnata da leggeri tocchi sull’arpa)

Ecco  la sound track del film Rob Roy : per la verità le tracce sono due Ailein Duinn  e Morag’s Lament, (arrangiate dai Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in cui la seconda è il verso d’apertura seguito dal coro

PRIMA VERSIONE
Il testo è ridotto al minimo, più evocativo che esplicativo di un tragico evento che doveva essere noto a tutti gli abitanti dell’Isola. La donna che canta è segnata da un dolore immenso, il suo Alain dai capelli neri è annegato in fondo al mare, e lei vaneggia di voler condividerne il sonno negli abissi stipulando un macabro patto di sangue.

Capercaillie nel Cd To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, la voce ‘kissed by God’ passa dal sussurro al grido, ripreso dalla cornamusa in un frangersi di onde del mare.

Meav, in Meav 2000 voce angelica, arpa e flauto

Annwn nel Cd Aeon – 2009 gruppo tedesco fondato nel 2006 che si definisce Folk Mystic; molto intensa anche questa interpretazione pur nella rarefazione dell’arrangiamento, con la voce limpida e calda di Sabine Hornung, la melodia portata dall’arpa, pochi echi del flauto e il lamento del violino, magnifico.


Trobar De Morte
il testo ridotto a sole due strofe ed estrapolato dal contesto si presta ad essere letto come il canto d’amore di una sirena nella risacca del mare (vedi anche Mermaid’s croon)

E’ la versione testuale più riprodotta con gli stili musicali più disparati grossomodo dopo il 2000  anche come sound-track in molti video giochi vedasi per tutti  Medieval II Total War

Gaelico scozzese
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,
traduzione inglese
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(1)
I would drink(2), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Che dolore senza fine,
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino.
CORO
Oh hi vorrei morire con te,
Alan dai capelli neri,
salve, vorrei morire con te.
Se ti è cuscino la sabbia,
sul letto d’alghe,
se i pesci ti sono luce di candela ,
e le foche sentinelle(1),
io vorrei bere(2), sebbene ciò mi faccia orrore,
il sangue del tuo cuore dopo il tuo annegamento

NOTE
1) per gli abitanti delle Isole Ebridi le foche non sono dei semplici animali, bensì creature magiche chiamate selkie, che di notte prendono la forma di uomini e donne annegati. Ritenuti una sorta di guardiani del Mare o giardinieri del fondale marino (la leggenda più diffusa è quella che le foche siano le anime degli annegati in mare) ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, abbandonerebbero le loro pelli per rivelare sembianze umane, per cantare e danzare sulle scogliere d’argento  (qui)
2) allude ad un antico rituale celtico, consistente nel bere il sangue di un amico in segno di affetto (il patto di sangue), usanza citata da Shakespeare (ancora praticata da tutti gli amici del cuore che si scambiano il sangue con un taglietto superficiale unendo i due tagli, così era anche praticato l’handfasting in Scozia: un tempo l’handfasting era soprattutto un patto di sangue, in cui si incideva con la punta di un pugnale il polso destro degli sposi fino a far sgorgare il sangue, dopodiché i due polsi erano legati a stretto contatto tra di loro con la “wedlock’s band” ovvero una lunga striscia di stoffa continua.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECONDA VERSIONE

Ecco l’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) da “Songs of the Hebrides“, brano citato anche da Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) lo scrittore dei “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake in “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  in “Ships Ahoy ! 2011”  

(Gaelico scozzese)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat
Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart.
An talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

(traduzione inglese Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan,

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto)
Sono colei che soffre
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino
Coro
Alan dai capelli neri

Vorrei morire con te
Alan dai capelli neri
vorrei morire con te
Non è per la morte del bestiame nel mese di maggio
ma per il tuo sudario bagnato,
sebbene le bestie fossero di certo mie, oggi poco mi importa di esse.
Ailein duinn vitello del mio cuore
sei tu alla deriva sulla costa d’Erin?
Che non vorrei fossi in una terra straniera,
ma in un posto dove il mio lamento ti possa raggiungere.
Ailein duinn, mio incanto e riso
vorrei per Dio essere vicina a te
su quella riva o  fiume su cui sei abbandonato,
su quella spiaggia su cui la marea ti ha lasciato.
Vorrei bere una bevanda, chi potrebbe negarlo,
ma non lo scarlatto vino di Spagna,
il sangue del tuo corpo, amore
vorrei piuttosto bere, il sangue che viene dall’incavo della tua gola.
Possa Dio irrorare la tua anima
con quello che ho delle tue dolci carezze,
con quello che ho del tuo parlare
con quello che ho dei tuoi dolci baci.
La mia preghiera a te, o Re del Trono
che io non vada nè in terra nè in cielo
che io non vada nè in paradiso nè all’inferno
ma nel letto d’alghe dove giace il mio Alan

Un’altra traduzione in inglese con il titolo  “Annie Campbell’s Lament” è quella degli Estrange Waters in Songs of the Water, 2016


Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Alan il nero, amore mio
vorrei seguirti
lontano sotto all’oceano
nei profondi abissi 
Alan il nero, vorrei seguirti
I
Oggi il mio cuore è pieno di dolore
la nave del mio amore è affondata nell’oceano
vorrei seguirti..
II
Soffro nel pensare alla tua figura
le tue bianche membra
e la camicia strappata e fatta a pezzi
vorrei seguirti..
III
Vorrei poter esserti accanto
su qualche scoglio o spiaggia dove stai dormendo
vorrei seguirti..
IV
Le alghe saranno la nostra coperta
e appoggeremo le nostre teste su soffici letti di sabbia
vorrei seguirti..

TERZA VERSIONE

Ma la versione più suggestiva e drammatica è quella riportata da Flora MacNeil che l’ha imparata dalla madre. Nata nel 1928 sull’Isola di Barra è una cantante scozzese depositaria di centinaia di canzoni in gaelico scozzese. “Le canzoni tradizionali erano trasmesse in famiglia e io sono stata molto fortunata ad avere mia madre e la sua famiglia come cultori dei testi e delle melodie delle vecchie canzoni. Era molto spontaneo per loro cantarle qualunque cosa facessero o di qualunque umore fossero. Mia zia Mary in particolare era sempre pronta ogni volta che glielo chiedevo, di interrompere qualunqua cosa facesse per discutere una canzone con me, e forse così facendo si ricordava di lunghe strofe dimenticate. Così ho imparato fin dalla tenera età moltissime canzoni senza sforzo. Come ci si può aspettare da una piccola isola, tante canzoni trattano del mare, ma, naturalmente, molte di esse potrebbero non essere  originarie di Barra”

La storia è diversa da quella maggiormente citata, qui la donna è sposata ad Alain MacLeann  che nel naufragio muore con tutti gli altri uomini della famiglia di lei: il padre e i fratelli; la donna si rivolge al gabbiano che vola in alto sul mare e tutto vede, per chiedere conferma della disgrazia; l’ultima strofa traccia immagini poetiche di un funerale del mare, con il letto di alghe, le stelle come candele, il mormorio delle onde per la musica e le foche come guardiani. Funerale e lamento ricorrono spesso nei canti delle donne rimaste sole con il dolore.

Flora MacNeil in una storica registrazione del 1951

Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

Traduzione inglese
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Un dolore senza fine mi è costato quel naufragio, non erano pecore, né  mucche, ma il carico che la nave ha portato via con se erano mio padre, i miei tre fratelli, e come se non fosse abbastanza, colui a cui diedi la mia mano: il mio MacLean, con la pelle candida, che mi prese in chiesa di martedì.(1)
“Gabbiano, gabbiano dell’oceano
dove hai lasciato i miei cari?”
“Lasciati soli, circondati dal mare schiena contro schiena, senza più respirare. “

NOTE
(1) il martedì è ancora il giorno in cui si celebrano tradizionalmente i matrimoni nell’Isola di Barra

QUARTA VERSIONE

Ancora una versione impostata proprio come una waulking song e ancora un testo diverso, questa volta la nave è una baleniera e Allen è naufragato nei pressi dell’Isola di Man.

Mac-Talla, in Gaol Is Ceol 1994 (fortunatamente nel video pubblicato su you tube c’è anche il testo con traduzione) solo le voci femminili e le note di un’arpa, ma che immediatezza…

S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

Traduzione inglese
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sono tormentata
e non penso al matrimonio stanotte
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei  
morire con te
non penso al matrimonio stanotte,
ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza
delle tempeste
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei
morire con te
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi vorrei morire con te

Ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza delle tempeste
che dovrebbero guidare gli uomini nel porto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ho saputo che hai attraversato il mare
su un’esile barca di scura quercia
e che sei sbarcato sull’Isola
di Man
che non è il porto che avrei
scelto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ero giovane quando mi sono innamorata di te
stasera il mio racconto è triste
non ti parlo di una mandria morta nella palude
ma della tua camicia bagnata
e di come sei circondato
dalle balene.
Allen dai neri capelli, mio caro amore
ho sentito che sei annegato
ma ahimè Dio, non ero accanto
a te
ovunque la marea ti abbia
rilasciato
vorrei bere, a dispetto
di tutti,
il sangue del tuo cuore
dopo che sei annegato

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm