Archivi tag: Alex Campbell

Sweet Nightingale from Cornwall

Leggi in italiano

In Italy, the nightingale returns in mid-March and leaves in September. His song, melodious and powerful, presents a remarkable variety of modulations and phrasings, by able songwriter, so that one can speak of a personal repertoire different from bird to bird.
In the folk tradition the nightingale is the symbol of lovers and their love meeting, immortalized by Shakespeare in “Romeo and Juliet” he sings at the pomegranate and the only choice is between life and death: to stay in the nuptial thalamus and die or to leave for exile (and perhaps salvation)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

JULIET
Wilt thou be gone?
It is not yet near day.

It was the nightingale,
and not the lark,

That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love,
it was the nightingale.

ROMEO
It was the lark,
the herald of the morn,

No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

Thus the song of the nightingale has assumed a negative characteristic, he is not the singer of joy as the lark but of melancholy and death.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Fresco detail Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompeii

The fresco in the House of the Golden Bracelet, in Pompeii, dated between 30 and 35 AD. depicting scenes taken from a wooded garden, portrays a lonely nightingale among the rose branches.
And it is precisely for his nocturnal hiding in the thick of the wood that in the traditional songs he has approached to trivial kind with double meanings alluding to the erotic sphere and his sweet song is an invitation to abandon oneself to the pleasures of sex.
The folk song was probably born in Cornwall with the titles of”Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” or “Down in those valleys below”.

“The words of Sweet Nightingale were first published in Robert Bell’s Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England, 1857, with the note:“This curious ditty—said to be a translation from the ancient Cornish tongue… we first heard in Germany… The singers were four Cornish miners, who were at that time, 1854, employed at some lead mines near the town of Zell. The leader, or captain, John Stocker, said that the song was an established favourite with the lead miners of Cornwall and Devonshire, and was always sung on the pay-days and at the wakes; and that his grandfather, who died 30 years before at the age of a hundred years, used to sing the song, and say that it was very old.” Unfortunately Bell failed to get a copy either of words or music from these miners, and relied in the end on a gentleman of Plymouth who “was obliged to supply a little here or there, but only when a bad rhyme, or rather none at all, made it evident what the real rhyme was. I have read it over to a mining gentleman at Truro, and he says it is pretty near the way we sing it.”The tune most people sing was collected by Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould from E.G. Stevens of St. Ives, Cornwall.” (from here)

The song also includes a version in cornish gaelic titled “An Eos Hweg“, but it is a more recent translation from the folk revival of the Celtic traditions.  It is a popular song often sung in pubs today in repertoire of the choral groups.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968

THE NIGHTINGALE
I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.

NOTES
1) Pretty Bets or Betty or Sweet maiden
2) the girl was a milkmaid and the young man offers to take home the bucket with fresh milk
3) certainly the girl had become pregnant

third part

LINK
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

Back of Bennachie

Sono numerose le canzoni popolari scozzesi che narrano d’incontri romantici “among the heather”( o come dicono in Scozia “amang the heather”) cioè in camporella, tra procaci pastorelle e baldi giovanotti, questo filone ha come luogo dell’appuntamento lo scenario delle Bennachie Hills, la montagna o collina come dir si voglia più famosa e conosciuta della Scozia nord-orientale.
Situata nel Garioch tra i fiumi  Don e  Gadie è una catena di alture, punto di riferimenti dell’Aberdeenshire della Scozia con la più alta, Oxen Craig, che arriva a circa 500 metri. (vedi prima parte)


This photo of Bennachie Hill Walks is courtesy of TripAdvisor

BACK OF BENNACHIE

Nel Nord della Scozia è una delle canzoni più popolari con il testo rielaborato a partire dal ritornello, con il titolo di “Braes o ‘Bennachie” o “The Back of Bennachie” ma anche “Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs” presenta  molte varianti. La melodia è “The Hessian’s March”  conosciuta dai più associata alla anti-war song My Son David” .
In merito ai testi sono sorte un po’ di confusioni per via delle tante rielaborazioni: il filone è quello agreste con un’idilliaca visione dell’amena località cantata nel mutarsi delle stagioni (John Imlah) oppure una nostalgica canzone dell’emigrante (Rev. John Park), ma anche un lament.

Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs

L’autore del testo è John Imlah (1799-1846) e nel  ‘The Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection’, vol VI sono riportate cinque versioni della canzone. La canzone nei versi di Imlah è una idilliaca visione dell’amena località cantata nel mutarsi delle stagioni (vedi).
Un testo ulteriormente rielaborato dal Rev. John Park  (1805-1865)  di St Andrew, la trasforma in una nostalgica emigration song!
ASCOLTA Alex Campbell  1963.

Rev. John Park*
O Gin I were whaur the Gadie (1) rins
Whaur the Gadie rins,
whaur the Gaudie rins
Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins
At the back (2) o’ Bennachie
I
Aince mair to hear the wild birds’ sang,
To wander birks an’ braes amang
Wi’ friends and fav’rites left sae lang
At the back o’ Bennachie.
II
Oh, an’ I were whaur Gadie rins,
‘Mang blooming heaths and yellow whins,
Or brawlin’ down the bosky linns
At the back o’ Bennachie.
Chorus
III
O Mary ! There on ilka nicht
when baith our hearts wew young and licht,
we’ve wander’d when the moon was bricht
At the back o’ Bennachie.
IV
O ance, ance mair where Gadue rins
where Gadue rins, where Gadue rins
o micht I dee where Gadie rins
At the back o’ Bennachie.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie

Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie
I
Per ascoltare ancora una volta cantare gli uccelli del bosco e vagare tra boschetti e colline con gli amici e i cari lasciati da tanto, ai piedi del  Bennachie
II
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
tra l’erica in fiore e la gialla ginestra,
o dove rimbottano le cascate dalle rive frondose
ai piedi del  Bennachie
Coro
III
O Maria! Là ogni sera,
quando entrambi i nostri cuori erano giovani e lieti,
andavamo a vagabondare quando la luna era luminosa
ai piedi del  Bennachie
IV
Oh una volta, ancora una volta dove scorre il Gadie, dove scorre il Gadie,
oh se potessi morire dove sorre il Gadie, ai piedi del  Bennachie

NOTE
*in Scots Minstrelsie, vol. I (1893) di John Greig. (qui).
1) Gaudie o Gadie è un ruscello dell’Aberdeenshire che sgorga dalla collina di Bennachie e sfocia nell’Urie, un affluente del Don
2) scritto anche come “foot”: il termine “retro” con cui verrebbe da tradurre “back” non ha molto senso, senonchè Back o ‘Bennachie è il lato nord della cresta montuosa, il lato più accidentato, è proprio il lato dove scorre il Gadie vicino al villaggio di Oyne. Perciò la traduzione corretta è : versante nord di Bennachie. Il titolo Back of Bennachie con cui viene chiamata talvolta questa versione rimanda all’idea-desiderio dell’emigrante di far ritorno nella sua terra natia.

Bennachie

La versione riportata da John Ord nelle sue “Bothy Song and Ballads” (1990) è invece un lament e racconta tutta un’altra storia.  In questa canzone una giovane donna si lamenta di essere stata fidanzata per ben due volte ma di non essersi mai sposata, perchè i suoi innamorati sono morti accidentalmente (uno in una rissa, l’altro affogato): invece dell’abito nunziale la donna indosserà un sudario, come quello dei suoi promessi sposi. Con il titolo The Gaudie è stata anche cantata da Hamish Imlach, in alcuni siti il testo è però erroneamente attribuito a John Imlah.
Alcuni ritengono che il racconto di omicidi e annegamenti nei dintorni del Bennachie sia precedente alla versione idilliaca diffusasi nell’Ottocento, alcuni studiosi ipotizzano un’origine dalle jacobite song.

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in New Tricks 1992


Gin I were whaur the Gaudie (1) rins
Whaur the Gaudie rins,
whaur the Gaudie rins
Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins
At the back o’ Bennachie
I
Oh I niver had but twa richt lads
Aye twa richt lads, twa richt lads
I niver had but twa richt lads
That dearly courted me
II
And ane  was killed at the Lourin Fair(2)
The laurin’ fair, at the Lourin Fair
Oh ane was killed at the Lourin Fair
The ither  was droont in the Dee (3)
III
And I gave to him the haunin'(4) fine
The haunin’ fine, the haunin’ fine
Gave to him the haunin’ fine
His mornin’  dressed tae be
IV
Well, he gave to me the linen fine
The linen fine, the linen fine
Gave to me the linen fine
Me windin’ shee tae be
V
Oh gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins Wi’ the bonny broom an’ the yellow whims Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins At the back o’ Bennachie
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie

Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie
II
Non ho avuto che due ricchi ragazzi
due ricchi ragazzi, due ricchi ragazzi, non ho avuto che due ricchi ragazzi che mi corteggiarono
III
E uno fu ucciso alla Fiera
di Lourin
alla Fiera di Lourin
alla Fiera di Lourin
l’altro fu affogato nel Dee
IV
E gli diedi della tela d’Olanda,
tela d’Olanda, tela d’Olanda
gli diedi della tela d’Olanda
perchè fosse il suo manto funebre
V
Lui mi diede della biancheria fine
biancheria fine, biancheria fine
mi diede della biancheria fine
perchè fosse il mio sudario
VI
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
con la bella erica e la gialla ginestra
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie

NOTE
1) Gaudie o Gadie è un ruscello dell’Aberdeenshire che sgorga dalla collina di Bennachie e sfocia nell’Urie, un affluente del Don
2) una fiera millenaria che si tiene ancora ogni anno nel villaggio di Old Rayne
3) Il Dee  scorre nella regione dell’Aberdeenshire.  L’area intorno al fiume è chiamata Strathdee, Deeside, o “Royal Deeside” dove la Regina VIttoria costrui’ il castello di Balmoral.
4) non riesco a trovare una corrispondenza del termine, probabilmente un refuso o un’incomprensione del termine “Holland”; nelle antiche ballate “holland fine” era un termine spesso utilizzato per indicare la tela d’Olanda, la tela di puro lino  di qualità superiore, pregiata per la sua finezza e lavorazione, dal colore particolarmente bianco e una trama fine ma compatta.

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/poetry/bonaccord/JohnImlahBiography.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/64507/10;jsessionid=F797E4DFFC105D8EC49E8A160DC7F655
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Bennachie(2).htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/gaudirin.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/gadierin.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/gadie.html
http://www.oldrayne.org.uk/about/index.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27891
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=2561
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=596

https://thesession.org/tunes/6988
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/scottskinner/display.php?ID=JSS0522

HO RO, NUT BROWN MAIDEN

Canto d’amore in gaelico scozzese conosciuto come “Ho ro, mo nigh’n donn bhoidheach” in tutte le Highlands della Scozia, diffuso anche in molte regioni di Cape Breton – Nuova Scozia (Canada) (vedi prima parte)

L’uomo assicura il suo eterno amore ad una giovane donzella. Il giovanotto, che vive nelle Terre Basse scozzesi, promette alla sua bella di ritornare nelle Highlands per sposarla e portarla via. A volte la donna si chiama Mary oppure Peggy. Egli ne magnifica la bellezza e le qualità morali secondo dei canoni abbastanza convenzionali.
La versione in inglese è stata pubblicata dall’editore George Thomson nel ‘Collection of Original Scottish Airs,’ (1802)che commissionò il compositore viennese F. J. Haydn per un arrangiamento classico di circa 200 melodie tradizionali scozzesi, così come fece versificare in inglese i testi in gaelico scozzese.

ASCOLTA
Alex Campbell

ASCOLTA Bob Lynch


CHORUS
Ho ro my nut-brown maiden,
Hi ri my nut-brown maiden,
Ho ro, ro, maiden!
Oh she’s the maid for me.
I
Her eyes so mildly beaming,
Her look so frank and free,
In waking and in dreaming
Is evermore with me.
II
O Mary, mild-eyed Mary,
By land, or on the sea,
Though time and tide may vary,
My heart beats true to thee.
III
In Glasgow or Dunedin
Were maidens fair to see;
But ne’er a Lowland maiden
Could lure mine eyes from thee.
IV
And when with blossom laden,
Bright summer comes again,
I’ll fetch my nut-brown maiden
Down frae the bonnie glen.

tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
Salve mia fanciulla
dai capelli nocciola

salve fanciulla
lei è la donna fatta per me
I
I suoi occhi così dolci e radiosi
il suo aspetto così schietto e tranquillo, da sveglio o in sogno
è per sempre sempre con me
II
O Mary dagli occhi dolci
per terra o per mare
anche se tempo e maree possono variare il mio cuore batte solo per te
III
A Glasdow o Dunedin c’erano belle fanciulle da vedere; ma mai una donna delle Terre Basse potrebbe distogliermi da te
IV
E quando carica di fiori
l’estate luminosa arriva di nuovo
andrò a prendere la fanciulla dai capelli nocciola, giù nella bella valle.

FONTI
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Nut_Brown_Maiden.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/bluebell.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=903

Dougie MacLean, un uomo che va per la sua strada

Classe 1954 pluripremiato cantautore, Dougie McLean è anche grande interprete di musica folk scozzese.
Negli anni 70 viene reclutato dal gruppo esordiente dei Tannahill Weavers in qualità di violinista (in famiglia il padre suonava il violino, la madre il mandolino e il nonno cantava in gaelico), ma è un musicista a tutto tondo che ha bisogno d’esprimersi e così nel 1977 con il chitarrista Alan Roberts forma un duo, gira l’Europa e scrive “Caledonia”; il duo diventa trio l’anno successivo con la sigla CRM e la collaborazione di Alex Campbell. E’ stato anche per alcuni mesi  in qualità di violinista il sostituto di  Johnny Cunningham con i Silly Wizard.
Negli anni 80 si trasferisce con la famiglia a Dunkeld, piccola cittadina scozzese ricca di storia a pochi chilometri da Perth e fonda la sua casa discografica la Dunkeld Records: niente major e compromessi, solo musica e la semplicità di una vita di campagna a cui ancorarsi tra gli alti e bassi del music business.

LA PRODUZIONE DISCOGRAFICA

Il suo primo album d’esordio come cantautore solista possiamo quindi considerarlo “Craigie Dhu” (1982) in cui registra una perla musicale “Ready for the Storm” rifatta da quasi tutti i musicisti scozzesi o della scena celtica.
ASCOLTA la versione registrata con Kathy Mattea per la serie “Transatlantic Sessions” prima stagione (1995/6)

Inanella quindi la bellezza di 21 album (+ 4 strumentali e 1 live) senza contare le compilation.
Tra questi “Tribute” del 1996, 11 brani in omaggio alla tradizione scozzese di una magia unica!
Nel 1993 la BBC ha prodotto un documentario sulla sua vita e la sua musica “The Land: Songs of Dougie MacLean” 

E ancora un paio di melodie tradizionali suonate con il violino o imbacciando la chitarra una manciata di amici
ASCOLTA Farewell to whiskey

ASCOLTA il violino di Maire Breatnach (live nel portico della casa di Dougie MacLean)

Perthshire Amber Festival

Nasce intanto il Dougie MacLean’s Real Music Bar (qui) sulle placide rive del fiume Tay. Spiega Dougie in un’intervista “I’ve played fiddle in this village’s pubs since I was a kid, along with the old-timers. It was normal then to play an instrument or sing. Pubs were places you visited to enjoy musical conversations as well as spoken ones. But over time, that died, along with the fiddling and the songs. It hit me a few years ago when I went to a bar, when off touring, and returned feeling worse than before. “Something wrong there”, I thought. I want back to those days, when pubs belonged to people. Here, there’ll be no TV, no Bandit and people can make music just when they want to. It’s not mere nostalgia: people communicating and making music is actually a challenge to the way things are. We’re talking about ownership of a culture, about human creativity. I don’t even care if people are bad musicians if they’re enjoying it and they’re giving. If they’re good, great – that pleases others, perhaps encourages them. I want minimum rules and I won’t vet the type of music either. Traditional, Country, Jazz, all fine by me“. (tratto da qui)

Dougie McLean alla prima edizione del Perthshire Amber Festival

Non contento nel 2005 dà vita al Perthshire Amber Festival che si tiene tra il villaggio di Butterstone e Dunkeld ai primi di novembre (vedi)

Oltre ad avere una voce vellutata è anche abile suonatore di violino e chitarra, nonché di vari strumenti a corda (mandola, viola, bouzouki, banjo). Nella sua feconda e lunga carriera ha collezionato una lunga lista di conoscenze, amicizie, collaborazioni con musicisti di fama e ha all’attivo una trentina di album la maggior parte come solista: Dougie McLean ha interpretato e riarrangiato moltissime canzoni del conterraneo Robert Burns, ma è stato soprattutto autore di brani memorabili che lo hanno reso una popolarità a livello internazionale: basti citare “Ready for the Storm“, “Caledonia”, The Gael”, This love will carry

Per ascoltare tutte le sue canzoni (e le versioni strumentali) pubblicate nel Blog seguite il tag Dougie MacLean

ASCOLTA Dougie McLean live

FONTI
https://scotlandcorrespondent.com/celebrity/caledonia-heart-and-soul/
http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2010/07/interview-with-dougie-maclean-songmaker.html
http://dougiemaclean.com/
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/incoming/dougie-maclean-celebrates-40-successful-4887494#5OeBHg35E1LoOAeP.97
http://www.perthshireamber.com/index.php/test/general/artists/42-dougie-maclean

Il canto dell’usignolo in Cornovaglia

Read the post in English

In Italia l’usignolo ritorna a metà marzo e riparte a settembre per svernare al caldo. Il suo canto, melodioso, potente, presenta una notevole varietà di modulazioni e fraseggi, da consumato interprete canoro, tant’è che si può parlare di un repertorio personale diverso da uccello a uccello.
Nella tradizione popolare l’usignolo è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, immortalato da Shakespeare nel “Romeo e Giulietta” canta presso il melograno ed è la scelta tra la vita e la morte: restare nel talamo nunziale e morire o partire per l’esilio (e forse la salvezza)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

GIULIETTA
Vuoi andare già via? Ancora è lontano il giorno:
non era l’allodola, era l’usignolo
che trafisse il tuo orecchio timoroso:
canta ogni notte laggiù dal melograno;
credimi, amore, era l’usignolo.
ROMEO
Era l’allodola, messaggera dell’alba,
non l’usignolo. Guarda, amore, la luce invidiosa
a strisce orla le nubi che si sciolgono a oriente;
le candele della notte non ardono più e il giorno
in punta di piedi si sporge felice dalle cime
nebbiose dei monti. Devo andare: è la vita,
o restare e morire.

Così il canto dell’usignolo ha assunto una caratteristica negativa, egli non è il cantore della gioia come l’allodola bensì della malinconia e della morte.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Dettaglio affresco Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompei

L’affresco nella Casa del Bracciale d’Oro, a Pompei,  databile fra il 30 e il 35 d.C. raffigurante delle scene tratte da un giardino boschivo,  ritrae un usignolo solitario tra i tralci di rosa.
E proprio i suo celarsi notturno nel fitto del bosco lo ha accostato a un certo filone di canti triviali con doppi sensi allusivi alla sfera erotica e il suo dolce canto è un invito ad abbandonarsi ai piaceri del sesso.
La canzone di tradizione popolare è nata probabilmente in Cornovaglia con i titoli di “Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” o “Down in those valleys below”.
Il testo di “Sweet Nightingale” fu pubblicato nel Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England di Robert Bell, (1857) con il commento  “Questa curiosa canzonetta – che si diceva di tradotta dall’antica lingua della Cornovaglia … l’abbiamo sentita per la prima volta in Germania … I cantanti erano quattro minatori della Cornovaglia, che all’epoca, il 1854 , lavoravano in alcune miniere di piombo vicino alla città di Zell. Il capo, o capitano, John Stocker, disse che la canzone era la prediletta dei minatori della Cornovaglia e del Devonshire, ed era sempre cantata nei giorni di paga e nelle veglie; e che suo nonno, che morì 30 anni prima all’età di cento anni, cantava la canzone, e diceva che era molto vecchia. “Sfortunatamente Bell non riuscì a ottenere una copia del brano da questi minatori, e alla fine si affidò a un gentiluomo di Plymouth che “fu costretto a riempire un po ‘qua e là, ma solo quando una brutta rima, o piuttosto nessuna, rendeva evidente quale fosse la vera rima. L’ho letto a un gentiluomo del settore minerario a Truro, e dice che è molto vicino al modo in cui lo cantiamo. “La melodia più cantata è stata raccolta dalla Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould di E.G. Stevens di St. Ives, Cornovaglia. ” (Tratto da qui)

Della canzone si conosce anche una versione in gaelico con il titolo “An Eos Hweg”, una traduzione  però più recente sulla scia del revival delle tradizioni celtiche in quel di Cornovaglia. (vedi). E’ un canto popolare intonato spesso dalla gente nei pubs oggi in repertorio nei gruppi corali.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968


I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI:
“Amore mio, accompagnami!
Non senti il canto appassionato,
le dolci note che l’usignolo effonde?
Non senti la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti?
II
Amore mio non ti sbagliare
perchè io porterò il tuo secchio(2)
al sicuro nella tua capanna, strada facendo potrai sentire la storia d’amore del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
III LEI:
“Ti prego di lasciarmi sola,
ho le mie di mani.
Con te non verrò
ad ascoltare  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
IV LUI:
“Ti prego stenditi
a terra con me,
su questa riva dove cresce la dolce primula
potrai sentire  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
V
Questa coppia decise
di sposarsi con celerità(3)
e subito alla chiesa andarono.
Lei non aveva più timore
di camminare nel bosco
e nelle valli sottostanti

NOTE
1) Pretty Bets o Betty oppure Sweet maiden
2) la fanciulla era una lattaia e il giovanotto si offre di portarle a casa il secchio con il latte appena munto
3) di certo la fanciulla era rimasta incinta

continua

FONTI
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

THE TROOPER AND THE MAID

Child ballad #299

soldierLa ballata risale quantomeno al 1600 e ha come tema l’incontro di una notte tra un soldato e una fanciulla prima che lui parta per la guerra. Lei immancabilmente resta incinta e a volte decide di seguirlo, anche se poi deve lasciarlo quando la gravidanza è troppo inoltrata. Lui risponde evasivamente ad ogni speranza di matrimonio e di ritorno..
La versione fa il paio con As I roved out

Steve Roud commenta nelle note all’antologia “Good People, Take Warning“, 2012 “Often called The Trooper and the Maid, this song was collected frequently in Scotland and North America, but less often in England. Child prints the three earliest Scottish texts, dating from the 1820s onwards, and Bronson presents 27 tunes. The story is pretty much the same across all versions, although the ending is sometimes different. The young lady in Harry List’s song seems quite happy with the proceedings, but in most other versions she asks the trooper when they are to be married, only to be answered with traditional put-offs such as “When cockle shells grow silver bells”, or “When apple-trees grow in the sea”. At least in the version from Newcastle in the 1840s (John Bell collection), the soldier’s reply is a more kindly “When the king cries peace and the wars do cease”.

THE TROOPER AND THE MAID

Pur nella varietà delle versioni testuali la melodia resta sempre la stessa

ASCOLTA Alex Campbell, Dougie MacLean, Alan Roberts in “CRM” 1979

Tannahill Weavers in “The Tannahill Weavers” 1997 che fanno una versione “ridotta” e condensata, presa poi come standard dagli artisti successivi (strofe I, III, IV, VI, X, IX, VIII) segue The Sound of Sleat

ASCOLTA The Duhks in Your Daughters & Your Sons 2002

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in Close to the Bone 1993 in versione integrale su Spotify, interessante la versione con le sole voci (voce leader Ian F. Benzie!
ASCOLTA Charlotte Cumberbirch in Assasin’s Creed IV “Black Flag” 2013 in cui il tempo è molto cadenzato dal rullo dei tamburi. Questa versione testuale si discosta da quella presentata pur restando molto simile e inglesizzata

ASCOLTA Stramash in “The Lion Rises” 2013 per la versione folk-rock con le “bagpipes punk”

TESTO IN GREIG-DUNCAN
I
A trooper lad came here last nicht/Wi’ riding he was weary
A trooper lad cam’ here last nicht
When the moon shone bright and clearly
Chorus
Bonnie lassie I’ll lie near ye noo
Bonnie lassie I’ll lie near ye
I’ll gar all yer ribbons reel
In the morning e’er I leave ye
II
She’s ta’en his heich horse by the heid,
An’ she’s led him to the stable,
She’s gi’en him corn an’ hay till ate,
As muckle as he was able.
III
She’s taen the trooper by the han’
And let him tae her chamber
She’s gi’en him breid (cheese) an’ wine to drink,
An’ the wine it was like amber
IV
She’s made her bed baith lang and wide/ And made it like a lady
She’s taen her coatie ower her heid
Saying trooper are ye ready?
V
He’s ta’en aff his big top coat,
Likewise his hat an’ feather ,
An’ he’s ta’en his broadsword fae his side,/An’ noo he’s doon aside her.
VI
They hadnae been but an ‘oor in bed
An ‘oor and half a quarter
Fan the drums cam’ beatin’ up the toon,
An’ ilka beat was faster.
VII
It’s “Up, up, up” an’ oor curnel cries,
It’s “Up, up, up, an’ away,”
It’s “Up, up, up” an’ oor curnel cries,
“For the morn’s oor battle day.”
VIII
She’s taen her coatie ower her heid
And followed him up to Stirling
She grew sae fu’ she couldnae boo
He left her in Dunfermline
IX
“Bonnie lassie I maun leave ye noo
Bonnie lassie I maun leave ye
An’ oh, but it does grieve me sair
That ever I lay sae near ye”
X
It’s “Fan’ll ye come back again,
My ain dear trooper laddie,
Fan’ll ye come back again
An’ be your bairn’s daddy?”
XI
“O haud your tongue, my bonnie lass,
Ne’er let this partin’ grieve ye,
When heather cowes grow ousen bows,/Bonnie lassie, I’ll come an’ see ye.”
XII
Cheese an’ breid for carles an’ dames,
Corn an’ hay for horses,
Cups o’ tea for auld maids,
An’ bonnie lads for lasses.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Un soldato (1) venne la notte scorsa
di cavalcare era stanco
un soldato venne la notte scorsa
quando la luna splendeva luminosa e bianca.
CORO (2)
“Ora bella fanciulla giacerò con te
bella fanciulla giacerò con te
ti farò volare via i nastri (dai capelli) (3) e al mattino mai ti lascerò”
II
Lei prese il suo grande cavallo per le briglie e lo condusse nella stalla
gli diede grano e fieno da mangiare
tanto quanto ne fosse capace
III
Lei prese il soldato per mano
e lo fece entrare nella sua stanza
gli diede del pane (formaggio) e del vino da bere
e il vino era come ambrosia (4)
IV
Lei fece il letto lungo e stretto (5)
e lo fece come una donna
si mise la cuffia intesta dicendo
“Soldato sei pronto?” (6)
V
Lui si levò la sua bardatura,
e anche il cappello con la piuma
si è levato lo spadone dal fianco
ed era pronto accanto a lei
VI
Non saranno stati che un ora a letto
un ora e un quarto
quando i tamburi vennero rullando in strada
e ogni colpo era più vicino (7)
VII
“Su, su, su” il nostro Curnel gridava
“su, su, su e via”, “Su, su, su” il nostro Curnel gridava “perchè il mattino è il nostro giorno di battaglia”
VIII
Lei si mise il cappello sul capo
e lo seguì fino a Stirling, ma si fece così piena che non ci riuscì più e lui la lasciò a Dunfermline
IX
“Bella fanciulla devo lasciarti adesso, bella fanciulla devo lasciarti
ma mi rammarica tanto di non potere più giacere accanto a te (8)”
X
“Quando tornerai di nuovo
mio caro soldatino
e quando tornerai di nuovo
e farai il padre a tuo figlio?”
XI
“O taci mia bella fanciulla,
non rendermi questa separazione più dolorosa, quando i rametti d’erica diventeranno gioghi di buoi bella fanciulla verrò a trovarti (9)”
XII
Formaggio e pane per i signori
e le signore
grano e fieno per i cavalli,
tazze di tè per le zitelle
e bei fanciulli per le fanciulle

NOTE
1) anche “soldier”
2) nella versione di Greig Duncan i versi sono una delle tante strofe
3) letteralmente make all your ribbons spin/ wheel/ fly about
4) Tannahill Weavers dicono: She’s gied him cheese and wine tae drink And the wine it was like amber (sono tipiche della serie le strofe in cui la ragazza rifocialla cavallo e cavaliere, dando loro da bere e da mangiare vedi anche As I roved out)
5) tipica espressione riguardo al letto rifatto
6) il ruolo di seduttrice spetta alla donna una vera e propria “saucy” girls; alcuni collezionisti di folksong ottocenteschi hanno così ritoccato il testo per far apparire la donna come più passiva
7) Tannahills Weavers dicono: When drums cam’ beatin doon the street And every beat was shorter
8) Tannahills Weaver dicono: And when will you come back again My own dear soldier laddie And when will you come back again And be your bairnies daddy
9)
Tannahills Weavers dicono “When heather bells grow cockle shells* Then I’ll come and see ye” (in italiano quando i fiori d’erica diventeranno conchiglie allora verrò a ritrovarti). Il nostro soldato  in realtà non ha nessuna intenzione di ritornare per sposarsi!!

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://knaomiconner.wordpress.com/the-trooper-and-the-maid/http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=42474 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7410&Title=TROOPER%20AND%20THE%20MAID
http://www.8notes.com/scores/6674.asp http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thelightdragoon.html

(Cattia Salto agosto 2014)