Archivi tag: Alasdair Roberts

A WARNING OLD SONG: MAIDEN NEVER WEDD AN OLD MAN!

Leggi in italiano

A Scottish humorous song, “Maids When You’re Young Never Wed An Old Man” discourages young women in marrying men who are too old, and its song, between irony and bitterness, is a warning to all.
The great difference in age between the two spouses was still a custom until the mid-1900s: older men married to twenties girls, who played the role of ante litteram carers!

The humor of the song springs from the allusive but never explicit language and the most obscene words are beeped maidenas “faloorum” and “ding doorum”: at first the young woman is courted by the older man and agrees to marry him, but when it’s time for going to bed she discovers that unfortunately her old man is impotent. So as soon as the old man falls asleep the girl, she throws herself into the arms of a young and manly lover.

Nowaday this song makes us smile but in the nineteenth century it was considered rather spicy: the simple allusion to sex was vulgar but the reference to impotence and adultery had to be outrageous! Despite everything, it became a popular song in Scotland, England, Ireland and America. The first publication dates back to 1869 in “Ancient Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads” by David Herd under the title “Scant of Love, Want of Love”.

The Dubliners (Verses 1-3-4-5-6-7) The song was seen to be offensive due to its sexualized themes and was banned by RTÉ and the BBC

Mairi  Morrison & Alasdair Roberts in Urstan, 2012 (verses 1-2-4-3) for a more sober version. The CD was commissioned by Scotland’s Center for Contemporary Arts as a tribute to Gaelic music and culture. An artistic collaboration increasing freshness and creativity.

Lucy Ward in “Adelphi Has to Fly” 2011, nominated Best Traditional Track BBC Folk Awards 2012.

CHORUS
For he’s got no faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum

He’s got no faloorum,
fadidle  all day
He’s got no faloorum,
he’s lost his ding doorum
so maids when you’re young,
never wed an old man

I
An old man  came courting me,
hey ding dooram day (1)
An old man came courting me,
me being Young(2)
An old man came courting me,
all for to  marry me(3)
Maids, when you’re young never wed an old man
II
When we sat down to tea,
hey doo me darrity
When we sat down to tea, me being young
When we sat down to tea, he started teasing me
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
III
When we went to church,
hey ding dooram day
When we went to church,
me being young
When we went to church,
he left me in the lurch (4)
Maids when you’re young, never wed an old man
IV
When we went to bed,
hey ding doorum day
When we went to bed, me being young
When we went to bed,
he lay like he was dead (5)
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
V
So I threw me leg  over him ,
hey ding dorum da
I flung me leg over him, me being young
I flung me leg over him, damned nearly smothered him
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man.
VI
When he went to sleep,
hey ding doorum day
When he went to sleep, me being young
When he went to sleep, out of bed I did creep
Into the arms of a handsome young man
VII
And I found his faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum
I found his faloorum,
fadidle all day
I found his faloorum, he got my ding doorum
So maids when you’re young never wed  an old man
VIII
I wish this old man would die,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
I wish this old man would die, me being Young
I wish this old man would die, I’d make the  money fly
Girls, for your sake, never wed an old man
IX
A young man is my delight,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
A young man is my delight, me being Young
A young man is my delight, he’ll kiss you day  and night
Maids, when you’re young, never wed an old  man

NOTE
1) or “Hey do a dority”
2) or Hey-do-a-day
3) or Fain wad he mairry me
4) or ” I left him in the lurch”
5) or “he neither done nor said”, and” he lays like a lump of lead”

https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/anoldmancamecourting.html
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/
never_wed_an_old_man_pmcnamara.htm

http://sangstories.webs.com/anauldmancamcourtin.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/m/maidswhe.html

WILD HOG IN THE WOODS

Child ballad # 18
TITOLI: “Sir Lionell”,  “Sir Eglamore”, “Sir Egrabell”, “Bold Sir Rylas”, “The Jovial Hunter (of Bromsgrove)”, “Horn the Hunter”, “Wild Boar”, “Wild Hog (in the Woods)”, “Old(e) Bangum”, “Bangum and the Boar”, The Wild Boar and Sir Eglamore, “Old Baggum”, “Crazy Sal and Her Pig”, “Isaac-a-Bell and Hugh the Graeme”, “Quilo Quay”, “Rury Bain”, “Rackabello”, “The Old Man and hisThree Sons”

La storia del prode cavaliere che sconfigge il male è stata narrata sia nel romance dal titolo Sir Eglamour of Artois  (circa 1350) che nella ballata Sir Lionel riportata dal professor Child e conosciuta con vari titoli.
Il romance è una storia intricata e piena di colpi di scena in cui il prode cavaliere per ottenere la mano della figlia del re, combatte contro un un gigante, un cinghiale e un drago e poi ritrova la sua amata dopo molte peripezie, ciò che resta dell’eroica ballata (vedi) è diventata invece una canzoncina per bambini

ASCOLTA The Furrow Collective in Wild hog 2016 (Alasdair Roberts voce e chitarra ) video musicale illustrato da un buffissimo e allucinato cartoon – quel suono etereo in sottofondo non è prodotto dal theremin ma dalla sega musicale

I
There is a wild hog in the woods,
diddle-oh down, diddle-oh day;
There is a wild hog in the woods,
diddle-oh;
There is a wild hog in the woods,
Kills a man and drinks his blood,
Cam o-kay, cut him down, 
Kill him if you can.
II
I wish I could that wild hog see,
And see if he’d have a fight with me.
III
There he comes through yonders marsh,
He splits his way through oak and ash.
IV
Bangum drew his wooden knife,
To rob that wild hog of his life.
V
They fought four hours of the day,
At length that wild hog stole away.
VI
They followed that wild hog to his den,
And there found the bones of a thousand men.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Cè un cinghiale nel bosco
diddle-oh down, diddle-oh day;
C’è un cinghiale nel bosco
diddle-oh;
C’è un cinghiale nel bosco
uccise un uomo e bevve il suo sangue
vieni e abbattilo,  uccidilo se ci riesci
II
Vorrei poter vedere quel cinghiale
e vedere se avrebbe lottato con me
III
Là viene da quelle paludi
si taglia la strada tra la quercia e il frassino
IV
Bangum tirò fuori il suo coltello di legno per togliere la vita al cinghiale
V
Lottarono per 4 ore del giorno
e alla fine quel cinghiale fuggì
VI
Seguirono quel cinghiale nella sua tana
e là trovarono le ossa di mille uomini

ASCOLTA Jean Ritchie in Olde Bangum la versione per bambini raccontata come una fiaba

FONTI
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/OLDBANGM.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-WildHog.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boldsirrylas.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50640

IL CAVALLANTE MESTIERE PERDUTO

Plooman laddies o  ploughboy lads erano i cavallanti agricoli, dei tempi in cui l’aratro era trainato dalla forza animale (e si dicevano bifolchi se a tirare l’aratro erano i buoi), il soggetto preferito delle bothy ballad le canzoni dei braccianti stagionali e salariati agricoli nelle grandi fattorie nel Nord Est della Scozia (in particolare l’Aberdeenshire).
Si occupavano dell’aratura, erpicatura e dissodamento dei campi e della cura degli animali da lavoro a loro affidati.

ploughman-evenPremetto che con lo stesso generico titolo si indicano diverse canzoni tra cui anche quella intitolata The Ploughboy Lads di Robert Burns questa invece inizia con “Doon yonder den there’s a plooman lad” ed è la versione collezionata da Lucy Stewart (1901- 1982)

Hamish Henderson commenta nelle note della versione di Isla St. Clair “Now one of the most popular songs in the Scots folk revival, The Plooman Laddies was put into circulation comparatively recently—in 1959, when it was recorded (on the family’s tape-recorder) by Lucy Stewart of Fetterangus. It descents from a much longer ploughman song, sung to the tune of The Rigs o’ Rye, but Lucy’s version has distilled from the earlier words and tune an intense lyric love-song unsurpassed in North-east erotic tradition.” (da qui)

ASCOLTA Lucy Stewart  su Tobar an Dualchais
ASCOLTA  Isla St. Clair in Isla St Clair Sings Traditional Scottish Songs. 1971 che mantiene tutta l’immediatezza della versione di Lucy Stewart.

ASCOLTA Mary Story

ASCOLTA Alasdair Roberts in The Crook of My Arm.2001 con il titolo di Ploughboy Lads

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers live con il titolo di Ploo’boy Laddies; se volete farvi due risate ecco le loro note di commento
A friend of ours once had a similar, emotionally taxing decision to make.  Should he marry the young, poor girl that he loved or the old, extremely rich woman who offered him warmth and security?  On asking the advice of his father, a wise but lonely widower of some 50 summers, he was told “Always marry for love, son, always marry for love.”
“Great, Dad.  Thanks!  I’m off to ask young Catriona right away.”
“Afore ye go, son,” says the old fellow cautiously, “what did ye say the old lady’s phone number was?”
(tratto da qui)


I
Doon yonder den(1)
there’s a plooman lad
Some simmer’s day
he’ll be aa my ain
And sing laddie aye,
and sing laddie o
The plooman laddies are aa the go(2)
II
In yonder toon ah
could hae gotten a merchant
But aa his gear
wisna worth a groat(3)
III
Doon yonder den ah
could hae gotten a miller
But aa his dust
wad hae deen me ill(4)
IV
I see him comin frae the toon (5)
Wi aa his ribbons (6)
hingin roon and roon
V
I love his teeth (hair),
an I love his skin
I love the verra cairt he hurls(7) in
VI
It’s ilka(8) time
I gyang(9) tae the stack(10)
I hear his wheep
gie the ither crack(11)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
In fondo alla valle
c’è un giovane cavallante
in un giorno d’estate
sarà tutto mio
e canta ragazzo si
e canta ragazzo oh
i cavallanti si vestono bene
II
Nella città laggiù
avrei potuto avere un mercante
ma tutta la sua mercanzia
valeva poco,
III
In quella valle lontana
avrei potuto avere un mugnaio
ma tutta quella farina
mi avrebbe fatto ammalare.
IV
Lo vedo arrivare dalla fattoria
con tutti i fiocchi
appesi (girare) in lungo e in largo
V
Amo i suoi denti (capelli)
e il suo incarnato
amo il carretto che conduce
VI
E’ quasi ora
di andare al covone
sento le sue grida
dare un altro comando

NOTE
1) Den: narrow wooded valley
2) Aa the go: in fashion, all the rage. Gli aratori erano un gradino sopra agli altri lavoratori agricoli.
3) Groat: archaic Scottish coin of low value
4) Deen me ill: made me sick
5) le grandi fattorie sono dette toon, impropriamente tradotte con town
6) probabilmente si riferisce alla pariglia di cavalli infiocchettati e tirati a lucido, oppure ai premi vinti per le gare tra cavallanti durante le fiere di paese
7) Hurls: rides (in a wheeled vehicle) cairt potrebbe essere anche l’erpice
8) Ilka: every
9) Gyang: go
10) Stack: peat stack
11) riferito agli ordini impartiti ai cavalli,forse si tratta di una gara tra aratori

continua BOTHY LADS

FONTI
http://www.folkways.si.edu/lucy-stewart-scottish-ballad-singer/childrens-world/music/article/smithsonian
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/59336/1
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1146lyr3.htm
https://projects.handsupfortrad.scot/scotlandsings/scots-songs/#plooman
http://sangstories.webs.com/ploomanladdies.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/ploughmanlads.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2588
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54646

POLLY ON THE SHORE

La ballata “Polly on the Shore”, anche conosciuta con il titolo di “The Valiant Sailor”,  è una popolare sea song al tempo di Orazio Nelson; la sua prima comparsa su una raccolta risale al 1744 (in “The Irish Boy’s Garland”) 16_ Morland, George - The Sailor's Farewell, c_1790: è il lamento (ovvero l’addio) di un giovane marinaio arruolato a forza sulla British Royal Navy che finisce ferito a morte; il suo pensiero tra il boato delle cannonate, il lamento dei feriti e l’odore del sangue misto alla polvere da sparo e al puzzo della morte, si perde nell’immagine di Polly dagli occhi scuri, la sua Polly alta e snella sulla spiaggia della loro terra.

L’ARRUOLAMENTO NELLA BRITISH NAVY

Ai tempi di Orazio Nelson si faceva ricorso a metodi brutali per l’arruolamento nelle Forze Navali Britanniche con il sistema detto “impressment” ossia l’arruolamento forzato ad opera di una “press-gang” nel corso di retate di massa o con il pretesto dell’arresto per reati minori in cui il malcapitato anche solo perchè vagabondo e ubriaco finiva legato come un salame e imbarcato (spesso privo di sensi). L’arruolamento poteva avvenire anche in mare e “per causa di forza maggiore” dopo aver abbordato una nave mercantile!

Nella versione di Trevor Lucas (nell’album Nine dei Fairport convention) il capitano di mare responsabile dell’impressment è nientemeno che un corsaro


When I, as pressed by a sea captain,
a privateer to trade
To the East Indies we were bound
to plunder the raging main
And it’s many the brave and a gallant ship
we sent to a watery grave
Ah, for Freeport we did steer,
our provisions to renew
When we did spy a bold man-of-war
sailing three feet to our two
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
Appena arruolato da un capitano, un corsaro dei commerci,
eravamo diretti per le Indie Orientali come predoni del vasto oceano
e più di una nave di prodi e coraggiosi
abbiamo seppellito sott’acqua:
a Freeport ci dirigemmo
per rinnovare le provviste
quando spiammo una nave da guerra
che salpava, tre piedi contro i nostri due. 

L’avvertimento espresso nella ballata è quello di stare alla larga dalla guerra e negli anni del folk revival e dell’intervento americano nella guerra del Vietnam questo divenne ovviamente un gettonato brano anti-militarista.

ASCOLTA John Jones in Risin Road (il primo singolo della voce degli Oysterband) 2009

ASCOLTA Trembling Bells & Alasdair Roberts 2010

ASCOLTA The Trees 1970

Le versioni si rifanno al testo registrato da Shirley Collins nel 1970, (ASCOLTA) nelle note di copertina dell’album Love, Death & the Lady Shirley dice di averla ripresa dall’ottantenne George Maynard Copthorne, Sussex.


I
Come all you wild young men
And a warning take by me,
Never to lead your single life astray
And into no bad company.
As I myself have done,
It being in the merry month of May,
When I was pressed by a sea-captain
And on board a man-o-war I was sent.
We sailed on the ocean so wide
And our bonny bonny flag we let fly.
Let every man stand true to his gun
For the Lord knows who must die.

II
Oh our captain was wounded full sore
likewise were the rest of his crew
Our main mast rigging(1)
it was scattered on the deck
So that we were obliged to give in.
Our decks they were all spattered with blood
And so loudly the cannons did roar
And thousands of times(2) I wished meself alone,and all alone with me Polly on the shore
She’s a tall and a slender girl
She has a dark and a-roving eye
And here am I lie a-bleeding on the deck
And for her sweet sake(3) I will die
III
Farewell, to my parents and my friends,
and farewell to my dear Polly too
I’d never would crossed the salt sea so wide
If I’d have been ruled by you
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Venite tutti, voi ragazzacci
e date retta al mio avvertimento
non perdete mai la retta via per le cattive compagnie come io stesso ho fatto!
Era il mese del bel maggio, quando fui “arruolato” da un capitano di marina e a bordo di una nave da guerra fui mandato.
Navigammo sul vasto oceano
e la nostra bella bandiera sventolava
e ogni uomo si aggrappava al suo fucile, che solo Dio sa chi morirà.
II
Il nostro capitano fu ferito in pieno
come pure accadde al resto della ciurma, il sartiame(1) del nostro albero maestro era sparpagliato sul ponte, così fummo costretti ad arrenderci.
Tutto il ponte era cosparso di sangue
e così forte i cannoni ruggivano
e mille volte avrei voluto essere solo,
tutto solo con la mia Polly sulla spiaggia
lei è una ragazza alta e snella
e ha occhi scuri e vivaci
e qui giaccio esangue sul ponte
e per il suo dolce amore io morirò
III
Addio ai genitori e agli amici
e addio anche alla mia cara Polly
non avrei mai voluto attraversare il vasto mare salato
se fossi stato sotto il tuo comando

NOTE
1) tra le tecniche di guerra navale del Settecento c’era quella preferita da Spagnoli e Francesi di fare fuoco con i cannoni nel sartiame per abbattere gli alberi delle navi nemiche. Impossibilitate a fare manovre queste potevano essere abbordate e conquistate in un combattimento corpo a corpo. Nella tattica inglese invece si sparava con i cannoni direttamente allo scafo.
2) oppure “many’s the time have I”
3) sake vuol dire anche a causa di , ma in questo contesto è per amore di, nel senso che la ragazza non è responsabile del suo arruolamento in marina.

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/pollyontheshore.html
https://antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=45254&lang=it
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/week-196-polly-on-the-shore/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9854
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arthur-mcbride.htm

THE LOVER’S GHOST

sleeperNella tradizione popolare sono molto numerose le ballate dette “night-visiting” in cui l’amante bussa alla finestra della fidanzata e viene fatto entrare nella camera da letto nottetempo. Alcune di esse aggiungono un tocco “macabro” trattandosi della visita di un revenant ossia di un fantasma fin troppo in carne!!

Come ad esempio in “Fair Margaret and Sweet William” è la bella Margaret che appare a William (presumibilmente in sogno) e lo “tormenta” (vedi). Nella ballata dal titolo “Sweet William’s Ghost” è invece William il fantasma, che legato a Margaret da una promessa matrimoniale e sebbene morto, non può riposare in pace fino a quando lei non lo scioglierà dal vincolo. (vedi)

Un’ulteriore ballata in tema è riportata dal professor Child come #248 in una sola versione settecentesca (Ancient and Modern Scots Songs, Herd, 1769), ma nella tradizione popolare sia in Inghilterra che in America si ritrovano quasi un centinaio di testi.

THE GREY COCK

La prima registrazione di “The Grey Cock” è quella del 1951 dalla voce di Cecilia Costello (nata Kelly, 1884–1976), di famiglia irlandese emigrata in Inghilterra per sfuggire alla Grande Carestia, così Roy Palmer commenta: “This ballad (Child 248) is variously called The Lover’s Ghost, Willie’s Ghost and The Grey Cock. Mrs. Costello seems to prefer the last, which she sometimes abbreviates to The Cock. The ballad was circulating in England as early as the seventeenth century, but no version as fine as Mrs. Costello’s has been collected. She believes that the ghostly lover was a soldier, and that the visit to his lady took place while his corporeal body lay mortally wounded on the battlefield. The cock’s summon to the ghost to return indicated that the death of the soldier was to take place.”

DAWN SONG OR REVENANT BALLAD?

Apro una parentesi che in altri contesti è argomento di accesa discussione: la ballata è una Dawn Song oppure una Revenant Ballad? Alcuni studiosi vedono nella versione di Cecilia Costello la testimonianza di uno stadio più antico della storia, ossia una storia di fantasmi che nel settecento ha perso il suo carattere soprannaturale per diventare una “dawn song” ossia una “night-visiting” song. Altri invece argomentano che la ballata è sempre stata una “dawn song”, e che piuttosto sia stato il gusto ottocentesco per il macabro, ad aver aggiunto il particolare più morboso dell’appuntamento con il “fantasma” (finito poi nella tradizione orale).
Hugh Shields nel suo saggio “The Grey Cock: Dawn Song or Revenant Ballad?” conclude che la forma più antica della ballata è quella che si rifà al genere della poesia cortese medievale ovvero alla lirica trobadorica e troviera nella particolare forma dell’aubade (Il canto dell’alba) e che solo in tempi più recenti si sia contaminata con una ghost story e in particolare con la “Sweet William’s Ghost”.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

La versione della signora Costello è riportata in “The Peguin Book of English Folk Songs” di Ralph Vaughan Williams & A. L. Lloyd.


I
“I must be going, no longer staying,
the burning Thames(1) I have to cross.
I must be guided without a stumble(2)
into the arms of my dear lass.”
II
When he came to his true love’s window,
he knelt down gently on a stone,
and it’s through a pane he whispered slowly,
“my dear girl, do you alone?”
III
She’s rose her head from her down-soft pillow,
and snowy were her milk-white breasts,
saying:”who’s there, who’s there at my bedroom window,
disturbing me from my long night’s rest?(3)”
IV
“oh, I’m your love and don’t discover,
I pray you rise love and let me in,
for I am fatigued from my long night’s journey,
besides, I am wet into the skin(4).”
V
Now this young girl rose and put on her clothing,
so quickly let her true love in.
oh, they kissed, shook hands, and embraced each other
till that long night was near an end.
VI
“willy dear, oh dearest willy,
where is that colour you’d some time ago?”
“o mary dear, the clay has changed me
and I’m but the ghost of your willy, oh.”
VII
“Then oh cock, oh cock, oh handsome cockerel,
I pray you not crow until it is day(5),
for your wings I’ll make of the very first beaten gold,
and your comb I’ll make of the silver grey.”
VIII
But the cock it crew, and it crew so fully,
it crew three hours before it was day,
and before it was day, my love had to leave me,
not by light of the moon or light of the sun(6).
IX
then it’s “willy dear, oh dearest willy,
when ever shall I see you again?”
“when the fishes fly, love, and the sea runs dry, love,
and the rocks they melt in the heat of the sun”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
“Devo andare, che non resterò a lungo,
il Tamigi in fiamme (1) devo
attraversare.
Sarò guidato senza passi falsi (2)
tra le braccia della mia amata ragazza”
II
Quando venne alla finestra del suo vero amore,
si inginocchiò piano sulla pietra
e attraverso il vetro sussurrò
piano
“Mia cara ragazza, sei sola?”
III
Lei alzò la testa dal soffice
cuscino
e nivei e bianco-latte erano i suoi
seni
dicendo ” Chi c’è, chi c’è alla finestra della mia stanza
che  disturba il mio riposo in questa lunga notte (3)?”
IV
“Oh sono il tuo innamorato, non mi smascherare, ti prego amore alzati e fammi entrare, perchè sono stanco del mio viaggio in questa lunga notte,
inoltre sono bagnato fino al midollo(4)”. V
Allora la giovane ragazza si alzò e si vestì
e lestamente fece entrare il suo amore. Oh si baciarono, si strinsero le mani e si abbracciarono finchè quella lunga notte stava per finire.
VI
“Caro Willy, oh amato Willy,
dov’è il colorito che avevi fino a poco tempo fa?”
“Oh cara Mary la terra mi ha
cambiato
e oh non sono che il fantasma del tuo Willy!”
VII
“Allora gallo o gallo
o bel galletto
ti prego di non cantare(5) fino a che è giorno
perchè le tue ali ricoprirò di oro zecchino e la tua cresta
d’argento”
VIII
Ma il gallo cantò e
cantò forte,
tre ore prima del giorno,
e prima che fosse giorno il mio amore mi dovette lasciare
né sotto la luce della luna, né sotto la luce del sole(6).
IX
“Willy caro Willy, quando ti rivedrò ancora?”
“Quando i pesci voleranno, amore e il mare si prosciugherà, amore
e le rocce si fonderanno al calore del sole!” (7)

NOTE
1) credo si riferisca all’accendersi del tramonto nelle acque del fiume che prendono il colore rossastro del cielo
2) “Senza posare piede” sono espressioni che stanno a indicare una vecchia credenza popolare: coloro che vengono in visita dall’Altro Mondo Celtico (dove hanno vissuto secondo lo scorrere del tempo fatato – un giorno presso Fairy corrisponde ad un anno terrestre) non devono posare i piedi sul suolo perchè altrimenti vengono raggiunti dall’età terrestre
3) la lunga notte è molto probabilmente quella del Solstizio d’Inverno
4) ho tradotto l’espressione secondo l’equivalente frase idiomatica in italiano: William è bagnato perchè presumibilmente è morto annegato
gallo-nosferatu5) la fanciulla per niente impressionata dalla notizia che il suo fidanzato è un revenant, prega il gallo di non cantare troppo presto e gli porge delle offerte in oro e argento. Così alcuni voglio vendere in questo gallo un mitico uccello guardiano delle porte dell’Altromondo (qui), ma francamente a me sembra una forzatura:il gallo è già di per sé un animale fortemente simbolico, e la frase si spiega senza dover ricorrere a un mitico quanto imprecisato uccello guardiano del mondo dei morti. Il gallo canta preannunciando il sorgere del sole, la cui luce dissolve il terrore delle tenebre: perciò per la proprietà transitiva il canto del gallo assume il potere di far svanire le creature della notte, gli incubi e i fantasmi. Tutta la strofa è conservata nella nursery rhyme Cock-a-doodle-doo (in italiano Chicchirichì) Oh, my pretty cock, oh, my handsome cock, I pray you, do not crow before day, And your comb shall be made of the very beaten gold, And your wings of the silver so gray. (The Annotated Mother Goose, William Stuart e Lucile Baring-Gould 1958)
6) l’alba è quel momento indefinito in cui non è più notte ma non è nemmeno giorno; il punto di congiunzione dei due mondi è un punto indeterminato così è una soglia che permette di passare da un mondo all’altro
7) situazioni paradossali che fanno parte di una lunga tradizione sulle imprese impossibili

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: LOVER’S GHOST

ligeiaLa versione proviene da Patrick W. Joyce che la imparò da ragazzo nel 1830 circa nella sua nativa Glenosheen, Contea di Limerick e che pubblicò nel suo “Old Irish Folk Music and Songs” (1909).

Qui il revenant è la donna
ASCOLTA Barbara Dickson 1968


I
“You’re welcome home again,” said the young man to his love,
“I’ve been waiting for you many a night and day.
You’re tired and you’re pale,” said the young man to his dear,
“You shall never again go away.”
II
“I must go away,” she said, “when the little cock do crow
For here they will not let me stay.
Oh but if I had my wish, oh my dearest dear,” she said,
“This night should be never, never day.”
III
“Oh pretty little cock, oh you handsome little cock,
I pray you do not crow before day(5)
And your wings shall be made of the very beaten gold
And your beak of the silver so grey.“
IV
But oh this little cock, this handsome little cock,
It crew out a full hour too soon.
“It’s time I should depart, oh my dearest dear,“ she said,
“For it’s now the going down of the moon(6).“
V
“And where is your bed, my dearest love,“ he said,
“And where are your white Holland sheets?
And where are the maids, oh my darling dear,” he said,
“That wait upon you whilst you are asleep?”
VI
“The clay it is my bed, my dearest dear,” she said,
“The shroud is my white Holland sheet.
And the worms and creeping things(7) are my servants, dear,” she said,
“That wait upon me whilst I am asleep.”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
“Benvenuta nuovamente a casa”- disse il giovane al suo amore
“ti ho aspettato
notte e giorno,
sei stanca e pallida”
disse il giovane alla sua cara
“non dovrai mai più andare via”
II
“Devo andare –
disse lei– quando il galletto canta
perchè qui non mi lasceranno restare.
Se fosse per me o mio
amore caro –
disse lei
questa notte non avrebbe mai
un giorno”
III
“Oh galletto, oh tu
bel galletto
ti prego di non cantare(5) fino a che è giorno e le tue ali
ricoprirò di oro zecchino
e la tua cresta d’argento”
IV
Ma quel galletto, quel
bel galletto
cantò prima di un’intera ora.
“E’ l’ora della partenza
mio caro amore –
disse lei
perchè ora tramonta
la luna(6). ”
V (8)
“E dov’è il tuo letto, mio caro amore –
disse lui
dove sono le tue bianche lenzuola di fiandra?
E dove sono le ancelle oh mio
caro amore –
disse lui
che vegliano sul tuo sonno mentre dormi?”
VI
“La terra è il mio letto, mio caro
amore –
disse lei
il sudario è il mio lenzuolo
di Fiandra
e i vermi e le serpi (9)
sono le miei servitori, amore –
disse lei – che vegliano su di me mentre dormo”

NOTE
8) la struttura dei versi richiama il funerale del mare già presente nelle wauking songs delle isole Ebridi (vedasi Ailein Duinn)
9) l’espressione è biblica

LA VERSIONE DI TERRANOVA

In questa versione si evince chiaramente che la donna è rimasta ad attendere il suo innamorato per lungo tempo mentre lui è morto in mare. In una non precisata notte Johnny ritorna a casa e bussa alla finestra della fidanzata perchè si svegli e lo faccia entrare nella camera.
ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger in ‘Blood & Roses’

ASCOLTA Ian & Sylvia 1975

ASCOLTA Alasdair Roberts in “Too Long In This Condition” 2010

Nelle note di copertina si legge “This is a revenant ballad from Newfoundland. It was collected by Maud Karpeles in 1929 and published in her Folk Songs from Newfoundland (1971). This version is from the singing of Alison McMorland and Kirsty Potts, recorded at the Fife Traditional Singing Weekend, May 2004. In Volume 2 of Tim Neat’s recently published Hamish Henderson: A Biography, Alison recalls being given, by Henderson, a recording of the song as sung by an unknown singer from Salford, near Manchester, England.”


I
“Johnny he promised to marry me,
But I fear he’s with some fair one gone. There’s something bewails him and I don’t know what it is,
And I’m weary of lying alone.”
II
Johnny come here at the appointed hour,
And he’s knocked on her window so low.
This fair maid arose and she’s hurried on her clothes
And she’s welcomed her true lover home.
III
She took him by the hand and she laid him down,
She felt he was cold as the clay.
“My dearest dear, if I only had one wish
This long night would never turn to day.
IV(8)
Crow up, crow up you little bird
And don’t you crow before the break of day,
And you’ll keep shielding made of the glittering gold
And that doors of the silvery gray.”
V
“And where is your soft bed of down, my love?
And where is your white Holland sheet?
And where is the fair girl who watches over you
As you taking your long, sightless sleep?”
VI
“The sand is my soft bed of down, my love,
The sea is my white Holland sheet. And the long, hungry worms will feed off of me
As I lie every night in the deep.“
VII
“Oh, when will I see you again, my love?”
“Oh, when will I see you again?”
“When the little fishes fly and the seas they do run dry
And the hard rocks they melt in the sun.”
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
“Johnny promise di sposarmi
ma temo sia andato con un’altra bella. C’è qualcosa che lo tormenta
ma non so cosa sia
e sono stanca di stare sola.”
II
Johnny venne qui all’ora
convenuta
e bussò alla sua finestra piano
piano.
La bella fanciulla si alzò e si vestì in fretta
per accogliere il ritorno a casa del suo vero amore.
III
Lo prese per mano e
si distese al suo fianco
e sentì che era freddo come la terra “Amore mio caro, se solo avessi un desiderio da esprimere,
questa lunga notte non avrebbe mai un giorno.
IV
Taci, taci tu uccellino (10)
e non cantare prima dello spuntare del giorno
e otterrai sbarre fatte
d’oro zecchino
e porte d’argento.
V
Dov’è il tuo soffice letto di piume,
amore mio,
dove sono le tue bianche lenzuola di Fiandra?
E dov’è la bella ragazza che veglia su di te
mentre tu prendi il tuo lungo sonno?
VI
La sabbia è il mio soffice letto dei fondali, amore mio
il mare è il mio lenzuolo di Fiandra
e i lunghi e affamati vermi
si nutriranno di me
mentre giaccio ogni notte negli abissi

VII
Quando ti rivedrò ancora,
amore mio?
Quando ti rivedrò ancora?
Quando le aringhe voleranno, e il mare si prosciugherà
e le rocce si fonderanno al sole!

NOTE
10) questa strofa è quella che si richiama al gallo anche se qui diventa un generico “little bird”: l’uccellino è tenuto nella gabbietta da qui la promessa di oro e argento per le sbarre e la porticina (shielding= cage)
ILLUSTRAZIONI
The Sleeper, Edmund Dulac
Fotogramma dal film Nosferatu
Ligeia

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/suffolk-miracle.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thegreycock.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theloversghost.html http://saturdaychorale.com/2013/04/15/ralph-vaughan-williams-1872-1958-the-lovers-ghost-by-vaughan-williams-lumina-vocal-ensemble/ http://www.8notes.com/scores/4737.asp?ftype=gif http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/7.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79144 http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1659 http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C248.html http://www.cavernacosmica.com/simbologia-del-gallo/

LADY OF YORK OR THE ORIGINS OF CRUEL MOTHER?

childsNell’articolo riportato da The Yorkshire Garland Group si ipotizza che la versione originale della ballata “The Cruel Mother” sia proprio il già citato broadside diffuso a Londra con il titolo:”The Duke’s Daughter’s Cruelty: Or the Wonderful Apparition of two Infants whom she Murther’d and Buried in a Forrest, for to hide her Shame“. Nel broadside la dama vive a York (vedi).
There was a Duke’s Daughter lived in York Come bend and bear away the Bows of Yew, So secretly she loved her Father’s Clark, Gentle Hearts be to me true.
Il finale sconsiglia vivamente le ragazze “bene” nell’amoreggiare con la servitù. ‘Young ladies, all of beauty bright, Take warning by her last goodnight’.

ASCOLTA Jim Eldon (1983) come la sentì cantare dalla traveller Eliza Wharton (North Shropshire e Staffordshire) a suo tempo riportata da S Burne nel “Shropshire Folk-Lore“, 1883-86, p540.

ASCOLTA Rayna Gellert The Cruel Mother in Old Light [2012] cantante e violinista  del North Carolina un background nelle old-time string bands nel suo album-debutto (da ascoltare su Spotify)

ASCOLTA Edan Archer 


I
There was a lady, lived in York,
All alone and aloney
She fell in love with her father’s clerk,
Down by the greenwood sidy.
She loved him up, she loved him down,
She loved him till he filled her arms
She leaned her back against an oak,
First it bent and then it broke
She leaned her back against a thorn,
And there she had two fine babies born.
She pulled down her yellow hair,
She bound it around their feet and hands.
She pulled out a wee penknife,
Stabbed those two babes to the heart.
She laid them under a marble stone,
Then she turned as a fair maid home.
II
One day she was sitting in her father’s hall,
She saw two babes come playing at ball.
“Babes, oh babes, if you were mine,
I’d dress you up in scarlet fine.
“Mother, oh, mother, it’s we were yours,
Scarlet fine was Our Own heart’s blood.
You wiped your penknife on your shoe,
The more you wiped, more red it grew.
You laid us under a marble stone,
Now you sit as a fair maid home.”
“Babes, oh, babes, it’s Heaven for you,”
“Mother, oh, mother, it’s Hell for you”.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’era una signora che viveva a York
tutta sola e così solitaria
e si innamorò del servitore di suo padre
ed era dentro al bosco più profondo(1)
Lo amava in tutti i modi e lo amò fino a quando lui le riempì il grembo.
Si appoggiò di schiena contro una quercia,
che prima si piegò e poi si ruppe, si appoggiò di schiena ad un biancospino(2)
e lì fece nascere due bei bambini.
Si strappò i biondi capelli
e legò loro mani e piedi.
poi estrasse un pugnale
e pugnalò quei due bambini al cuore
Li seppellì sotto una lastra di marmo
e poi ritornò a casa come una fanciulla.
II
Un giorno che se ne stava nella
casa paterna
vide due bei bambini
giocare alla palla
“O bambini se foste miei
vi vestirei con bella seta scarlatta”
“Oh madre, madre
quando eravamo tuoi
la seta scarlatta era
il sangue del nostro cuore.
Hai pulito il pugnale sulla scarpa
e più lo pulivi più rosso diventava (3).
ci hai seppellito sotto una lastra di marmo
e ora stai come una bella fanciulla”.
“Bambini il cielo è per voi”
“Mamma l’inferno è per te”

NOTE
1) il greenwood è la parte del bosco più impenetrabile dove i Celti credevano si celasse l’ingresso dell’AltroMondo (vedi), ma è anche il luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti
2) probabilmente un prugnolo o un biancospino; possiamo dedurre che siamo agli inizi della bella stagione poiché con lo spino del maggio si festeggiava fin dai tempi antichi l’arrivo della Primavera.
E’ interessante questa variazione con l’albero della quercia che si spezza per le fatiche delle doglie
3) il pugnale insanguinato che non si riesce più a pulire è un simbolo nelle antiche ballate provenienti dalla Scandinavia della colpevolezza, le mani  si macchiano del sangue innocente e rivelano l’assassino, così nel Medioevo si toccava il cadavere esposto per mostrare la propria innocenza.

Ecco ancora altre versioni per lo più simili e con piccole differenze testuali contaminate con le versioni già analizzate nella prima e seconda parte.

ASCOLTA Cindy Mangsen. La versione è identica a quella di Joan Baez tranne per il fatto che la fanciulla adesso viene da York e anche la prima parte del refrain è cambiata in All alone and aloney

There was a lady lived in York
It was all alone and aloney
she fell in love wi’ her father’s clerk
Down by the Greenwood sidey

He courted her for a year and a day
‘Til he the young girl did betray
She leaned her back up against the thorn
And there she had two little babes born
She took her pen knife clean and sharp
And pierced those two babes to the heart
She washed the pen knife in the brook
but the more she washed the redder looked

As she was walking her father’s hall
She spied two babes a-playin’ ball
She said, “O babes if thou were’t mine
I’d dress you up in silk so fine”
“Ah, mother dear, when we were thine
You did not treat us then so fine”
“Ah babes, babes if you you can tell
What kind of death I’ll have to die”
“Seven years a fish in the flood
Seven years a bird in the wood
Seven years a tongue in the mourning bell
Seven years in the flames of hell”
“Welcome, welcome, fish in the flood
Welcome, welcome, bird in the wood
Welcome tongue in the mourning bell
God, spare me from the flames in hell”

ASCOLTA The Owl Service in “The view from the hill” 2010 (una versione interessante, dal sound molto vintage)

There was a lady lived in York
all alone and aloney
she was courted by her father’s clerk
Down by the Greenwood sidy

He courted her for seven years long
‘Til she proved be in child by him
She leaned her back against the tree
And there she found great misery

She leaned her back against the thorn
and there she had two pretty babes born
She had a pen-knife long and sharp
And she pressed it through their tender hearts.
She digged a grave both wide and long,
and she burried under a marble of stone
And she was set in her father’s hall
when she saw two babes a-playin’ ball
“O babes oh babes, if you were mine
I’d dress you up in the scarlet fine”
“Ah, mother mother, once we were thine
and You didn’t dress us in scarlet fine ”
“Ah babes, oh babes come tell to me
if you know what’s feature live to me”
“O mother mother you know wrigh well
‘tis we for heaven and you for hell”

ASCOLTA Ian & Sylvia Greenwood Sidie-O

There was a lady lived in yore
Comely and lonely 
Fell in love with her father’s clerk
Down by the Greenwood Sidie – o

She loved him up, she loved him down
Loved him ‘til he filled her arms
She leaned her back against an oak
First it bent and then it broke
She leaned her back against a board
There she had two fine babes born
She took out her reapin’ knife
There she took those sweet babes’ lives
She wiped the blade against her shoe
The more she rubbed the redder it grew
She went back to her father’s hall
Saw two babes a-playin’ at ball
Babes, oh babes, if you were mine
I’d dress you up in scarlet fine
Mother, oh mother, when we were yours
Scarlet was our own heart’s blood
Babes, oh babes, it’s Heaven for you
Mother, oh mother, it’s Hell for you!

THE SUN SHINES FAIR ON CARLISLE WALL

Sir Walter Scott nella sua poesia “The English Ladye and the Knight” scritta nel 1805 narrando di un amore sfortunato, introdusse l’intercalare “The sun shines fair on Carlisle wall” .. “For Love will still be lord of all“. (vedi la versione di Loreena McKennitt qui)
Il ritornello è ripreso in questa versione ottocentesca di The Cruel Mother dove però “Amore” si trasforma misteriosamente ovvero per assonanza in “Leone“!

La poesia è pubblicata in Poems of Places (1876-79) da Henry W. Longfellow (vedi). e riprende quasi pari-pari il testo di “Fine flowers in the valley” (vedi). Propongo per l’ascolto due versioni aventi la stessa melodia la prima dei Silly Wizard più aderente alla poesia dell’anonimo riportata da Longfellow, la seconda di Alasdair Roberts più descrittiva che è una specie di riassunto di “Down by the Greenwood side” (vedi)

Silly Wizard  con il titolo “Carlisle wall” nel loro primo album “Silly Wizard” 1976, un approccio molto “gothic”, la formazione è ancora agli esordi con Alastair Donaldson (basso e organo) e Freeland Barbour (fisarmonica) che saranno sostituiti da Martin Hadden e Phil Cunningham


I
She leaned her head against a thorn,
The sun shines fair on Carlisle wa’(15);
And there she has her young babe born,
And the lyon shall be lord of a’.
“Smile no sae sweet, my bonnie babe,
An ye smile sae sweet ye’ll smile me dead,”
She’s howket a grave by the light o’ the moon,
And there she’s buried her sweet babe in,
II
As she was going to the church,
She saw a sweet babe in the porch,
“O bonnie babe, an ye were mine,
I’d clead you in silk and sabelline,”–
“O mother mine, when I was thine,
To me ye were na half sae kind,
But now I’m in the heavens hie,
And ye have the pains of hell to dree”-
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Appoggiò la schiena ad uno spino
il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle(1)
e lì fece nascere due bei bambini
e il Leone è padrone di tutto
“Non sorridere così dolcemente, mio bel piccino,
se sorridi così dolcemente mi farai morire”
Scavò una fossa sotto la luce della luna
e ci seppellì il suo piccolino.
II
Mentre andava in chiesa
vide un dolce bambino nell’androne
“O piccolino se tu fossi mio
ti rivestirei di seta preziosa”
“O madre crudele, quando ero tuo
non ti sei comportata con me in modo così gentile
ma ora io sono in Paradiso
e tu devi sopportare le pene dell’Inferno”

NOTE
1) Carlisle castle si trova in Cumbia al confine tra Inghilterra e Scozia

ASCOLTA Alasdair Roberts in “No Earthly Man” 2005

She has leaned her back up against the thorn
The sun shines down on Carlisle Wall
Then she has a bonny babe born
And the lion shall be lord of all

She layed him beneath some marble stone
Thinking to go a maiden home
As she was going to the church,
She saw a sweet babe in the porch,
“Oh bonny babe if you were mine
I’d dress you in that silk so fine”
“Oh mother mine when I was thine
I didn’t see any of your silk so fine”

“Oh bonny babe pray tell to me
The sort of death I shall have to die”
“Seven years of fish, fish in the flood
Seven years of bird in the wood
Seven years of tongue to the warning bell
Seven years in the flames of hell”

“Welcome, welcome fish in the flood
Welcome, welcome bird in the wood
And welcome tongue to the warning bell
But God keep me from the flames of hell”

versione Irlandese: continua 

FONTI
http://www.yorkshirefolksong.net/song.cfm?songID=73
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_20 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17087 http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thecruelmother.html http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/ scotlandssongs/secondary/greenwoodside.asp
http://aperturaastrappo.blogspot.it/2014/05/ murder-ballads-greenwood-side-cruel.html http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/CruelMother.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64053 http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/fair-flowers-of-helio–walsh-nl-1930-greenleaf-a.aspx
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6876 http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/poem/2010/03/ sex_violence_and_the_supernatural.html
http://www.yorkshirefolksong.net/song_database/ Supernatural/The_Lady_of_York.89.aspx
http://www.letras.com.br/john-wesley-harding/the-lady-dressed-in-green/print

BEWAR OF LONG LANKIN

(Child #93)
TITOLI: (False) Lamkin, Long Lankin,

Long Lankin è la personificazione dell’uomo nero pronto a sgozzare quelli che al calare del buio restano fuori casa o non chiudono bene la porta (e le finestre). La ballata, una delle più cupe tra le murder ballads pare abbia un fondamento storico.
Un capomastro fiammingo costruisce il castello di un signorotto scozzese, ma il Lord si guarda bene dal pagarlo alla fine del lavoro. Così approfittando della sua assenza il capomastro si introduce nel castello, e aiutato dalla fantesca, uccide il bambino e la moglie del Lord. Il professor Child ambienta la storia a Balwearie Castle vicino a Kirkcaldy nel Fife (vedi) ma molti castelli diroccati del Perthshire, dello Scottish Borders e anche del Northumberland si dicono infestati dal fantasma della Lady!

IL CAPOMASTRO FIAMMINGO

Il “mason good” è sicuramente un capomastro (un master mason) colui che nel medioevo assume il ruolo di “protomagister il migliore tra gli operai specializzati, spesso il più abile tra gli scalpellini, in grado di tradurre in costruzione il progetto dell’architetto (che spesso all’epoca era lo stesso committente dell’opera) e portatore di tradizioni artistiche peculiari.
 Sotto il nome di magistri operis o operum, o operis lapidum o fabricae, lapicidae, latomi, operarii, sono designati veri e proprî artisti, che, gloriosi della tradizione tramandata da padre in figlio più che del sapere, dopo essersi esercitati ed affermati nella regione natale, vengono chiamati a portare in ogni parte del mondo l’impronta di quelle costumanze artistiche locali, che, pertanto, s’avviano a divenire universali. (tratto da treccani.it)
Nel Medioevo è uomo che viene dal basso ma sulla strada per l’acculturazione, che si eleverà in alcuni casi nella figura professionale dell’architetto. Nel Rinascimento il capomastro è invece più precisamente il capo del cantiere, l’imprenditore
E così Lambert Linkin (Lamkin, Lammikin, Long Lankin, Lonkin, Lantin, Long Longkin, Rankin, Balcanqual, Balankin) era il nome di un capomastro fiammingo essendo “Lambert” derivato dal nederlandese Lamkijn, Lambkijn, il cui vezzeggiativo in Scozia si puo’ tradurre in italiano come “Lambertuccio”. Nonostante il nomignolo richiami una certa innocuità o innocenza (lamb, lambkin in inglese significano agnello e “agnellino”) l’uomo era un bruto e non essendo stato pagato dal Lord al quale aveva appena finito di costruire un castello, si è vendicato uccidendogli moglie e figlio!

UNA FURIA CIECA

Questo tipo di vendetta non era peraltro insolita nel Medioevo (e nemmeno tra i malavitosi ben più moderni): la ritorsione sui parenti e in particolare la discendenza di colui che aveva causato il torto (o non pagava il “prestito”).
La storia mi lascia un po’ perplessa, il nostro capomastro è già elevato al rango di “artista” e non è un semplice e rozzo manovale, sicuramente avrebbe trovato protezione nella sua corporazione e sarebbe ricorso al giudice per ottenere il pagamento di quanto dovuto; all’epoca nessun “plebeo” si sarebbe permesso di sterminare la famiglia di un nobiluomo, prima cosa perchè il nobiluomo in questione era sempre difeso dai suoi bravi, e poi perchè sarebbe sicuramente finito sulla forca. Perciò tra gli studiosi c’è chi vede in questa ritorsione una sorta di ribellione “sociale” di chi è sfruttato dal potente e che ad un certo punto reagisce con furia cieca…

Il nobile è variamente denominato come Lord Wearie, Erley, Earley, Murray, Arran, Montgomery, Cassilis, e dovendo assentarsi dal castello, ma temendo la vendetta del capomastro, si raccomanda alla moglie di chiudere bene porte e finestre, senonchè l’assassino riesce ad entrare (spesso grazie all’aiuto della nutrice la quale già covava del risentimento verso la padrona). Lamkin prima si avventa sul bambino nella culla le cui grida richiamano la Lady dalle sue stanze al piano superiore. Troppo tardi la donna offre tanto oro in cambio della vita (o la mano della figlia) perchè oramai Lamkin, accecato dalla bramosia del sangue, la uccide!
Alcuni vedono addirittura nella fantesca la vera manipolatrice che per vendicarsi della padrona riesce a controllare Lamkin come se fosse una sorta di Golem vendicatore..

long-lamkin-aranda-dillIllustrazione di Aranda Dill

I CASTELLI INFESTATI

le rovine di Balwearie Castle

A mio avviso è più probabile che la storia del capomastro vendicativo sia una sorta di tentativo di razionalizzazione della ballata il quale ha dato l’estro al gusto romantico per il macabro, che ci ha regalato così tante novelle e racconti “gotici”, nella creazione di un’ambientazione “reale” presso le varie rovine avvinte dalla vegetazione così pittoresche e ricche di mistero!
E così nel Nord d’Inghilterra si perde il conto dei castelli infestati dal fantasma della sfortunata Lady (tra le ambientazioni più famose le location delle rovine di Nafferton Castle come “tana” di Long Lankin e Welton Hall come luogo del massacro (vedi) oppure il “Lambirkyns Wod” citato da Child vicino a Duppin nel Perthshire o anche Whittle Dene, nei pressi di Ovindoli; e ancora Starlight Castle oppure Bunkle Castle nel Berwickshire (vedi)

Insomma la ballata è stata rigirata in tutti i modi analizzando tutti i più piccoli riferimenti storici, sociali, e psicologici.

LA PSICOLOGIA DI UNA BALLATA: L’ABBANDONO E IL SENSO DI COLPA

Rika Ruebsaat e Jon Bartlett nel loro saggio “Lamkin, The Terror of Countless Nurseries” guardano alla ballata per quello che è, ossia una fiaba cantata (le ballate erano infatti le canzoni delle madri per calmare i bambini e farli addormentare o per istruirli intrattenendoli con il canto, erano le canzoni che si cantavano nelle stanze delle donne intente ai lavori di tessitura e ricamo), e invece di cercarne la razionalizzazione ne spiegano il fascino oscuro come metafora per il percorso di crescita interiore. (vedi)

Depurata da ogni razionalizzazione la ballata parla di un bambino, una coppia di genitori “buoni” e una coppia di genitori “cattivi” così Lamkin è l’uomo nero, che vive nella palude sempre pronto a entrare nelle case e negli incubi della gente non appena gli si lasci uno spiraglio per l’accesso (o ci si comporti male o si senta il bisogno di essere puniti per qualche nostra mancanza vera o presunta che sia).

Il professor Child riporta ben 25 varianti della ballata, la prima risalente al 1775 e l’ultima al 1892, per lo più scozzesi ma anche provenienti dall’Irlanda.
Una ballata sebbene non estremamente popolare tuttavia cantata ancora oggi in Scozia, Inghilterra, isola di Terranova, New England, Stati del Sud e Middle West per lo più a due voci (l’uomo che interpreta il narratore, Lamkin e Lord Wearie e la donna che interpreta la balia e Lady Wearie).

LO SPIRITO TUTELARE DELLA CASA

Altri studiosi leggono tra le righe e vedono in Lamkin la personificazione del “genius loci” ovvero il nume, lo spirito tutelare del luogo al quale era consuetudine sacrificare un innocente come tributo per la costruzione dell’edificio. Citando una mia nota in “The Well Below The Valley-O” (vedi) “seppellire un cadavere sotto la pietra del focolare di una nuova casa era un’antica pratica propiziatoria per la prosperità e la fertilità della nuova famiglia. I sacrifici umani e animali erano un rituale per placare gli dei che quindi si potevano ritenere soddisfatti. Il sacrificio umano era l’offerta più alta e “santa” per suggellare un confine sacro come quello di un nuovo insediamento e faceva parte dei rituali di molte civiltà all’atto della fondazione di una città con relativa sepoltura dei corpi sotto la soglia delle porte della cinta muraria, ma anche di un cippo di confine. Una casa durerà solo se sotto giace una vita distrutta.
Così il proprietario del castello che aveva stipulato un patto con il diavolo e non lo mantiene, deve comunque pagare il suo tributo con il sacrificio del sangue.

ASCOLTA dalla tradizione orale dell’Arkansas tre versioni risalenti alla fine anni 50 e 60

ASCOLTA The Wainwright Sisters in “Songs In The Dark” (2015) che saltano i versi riguardanti la figlia (VIII e IX) ne fanno una filastrocca

ASCOLTA Jim Moray in Modern History 2010. Di questa versione così fresca e attuale non ho trovato al momento il testo, pur simile ai sottostanti. Mi piace in particolare l’uso della ghironda nelle parti strumentali e la scelta del tempo ritmico (un valzer lento come una sorta di danza macabra)
Nel video live invece l’esibizione con il solo accompagnamento della chitarra

Alasdair Roberts & Friends: Long Lankin [2010]: questa versione si distingue per l’interpretazione dei personaggi e per come la musica si pieghi a sottolineare i passaggi cruciali

ASCOLTA Fire + Ice in Gilded By The Sun (1992): un andamento ipnotico sostenuto da una intonazione piatta e piena d’eco molto creepy! (strofe I, II, III, IV, V

“The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs”
I
Said the lord to the lady as he mounted his horse
‘Beware of Long Lankin who lives in the moss’
Said the lord to the lady as he rode away
‘Beware of Long Lankin who lives in the hay
II
‘Let the doors all be bolted and the windows all pinned
And leave not one hole for a mouse to crawl in (creep in)’
So the doors were all bolted and the windows all pinned
Except for one window which Lankin crawled in
III
‘Where’s the lord of this house?’ then up spoke Long Lankin
‘He’s away to fair London’, said the false nurse to him
‘Where’s the heir of this house?’ then up spoke Long Lankin
‘He’s asleep in his bedroom (cradle)’, said the false nurse to him
IV
‘Then we’ll prick him, we’ll prick him all over with a pin
And that’ll make his lady to come down to him’
So he’s pricked him, he’s pricked him all over with a pin
And the nurse held the basin for the blood to flow in
V
‘Oh nurse, how you slumber, oh nurse, how you sleep
You leave my son Johnson to cry and to weep’
‘I’ve tried him with an apple, I’ve tried him with a pear
Come down my fair lady, and rock him in your chair
VI
‘I’ve tried him with milk and I’ve tried him with pap
Come down my fair lady and rock him in your lap’
So the lady’s come down, she was thinking no harm
But Lankin was waiting to catch her in his arms
VII
‘You can have my daughter Betsy, so young and so sweet
You can have as much money as there’s stones in the street”
‘I don’t want you daughter Betsy, nor the stones in the street
I would rather have your life’s blood running down at my feet’
VIII
There was blood in the kitchen, there was blood in the hall
There was blood in the parlour where the lady did fall’
Then Betsy being up in the turret so high
She saw her father come riding by
IX
‘Oh father, oh father, don’t lay the blame on me
‘Twas the false nurse and Lankin killed your baby
‘Oh father, oh father, don’t lay the blame on me
‘Twas the false nurse and Lankin killed your lady’
X
So Lankin was hung on the gibbet so high
And the false nurse was burned in the fire close by
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Disse il Lord alla Lady mentre montava a cavallo
“Attenta a Long Lankin che vive nella palude”
disse il lord alla sua lady mentre cavalcava lontano
” Attenta a Long Lakin che vive
nei campi.
II
Tenete le porte serrate e le finestre ben chiuse
e non lasciate nemmeno un buco che un topo possa strisciarci dentro (1)”.
Così le porte furono tutte serrate e le finestre ben chiuse
tranne che una finestra da dove Lankin strisciò dentro
III
 “Dovè il Lord della casa?” – gridò Long Lankin
“E’ fuori nella bella Londra” – disse la falsa balia (2)
” Dov’è l’erede della casa (3)?” –
gridò Long Lankin
“Dorme nella sua stanza”
– disse la falsa balia.
IV
“Allora lo infilzeremo dappertutto con uno spillo (4)
così la sua Lady scenderà
giù da lui”
Così lo punse, lo punse dappertutto con uno spillo
e la balia teneva la bacinella (5) perchè il sangue ci colasse dentro
V
O nutrice come dormi, come puoi dormire
e lasciare mio figlio Johnson gridare e piangere?”
“Ho provato con una mela, ho provato con una pera
scendi giù mia bella Lady e cullalo sulla tua sedia.
VI
Ho provato con il latte e ho provato con la pappa,
scendi giù mia bella Lady e cullalo in grembo” (6)
Allora la Lady scese giù pensando non ci fosse pericolo
ma Lankin la stava aspettando per prenderla tra le braccia (7)
VII
“Puoi avere la mia figlia Betsy così giovane e innocente(8)
puoi avere tanto denaro quante sono le pietre in strada”.
“Non voglio tua figlia Betsy e nemmeno le pietre in strada,
piuttosto voglio avere il tuo sangue vitale che mi corre ai piedi.”
VIII
C’era sangue in cucina, sangue nella sala
c’era sangue nel salotto dove la Lady cadde
allora Betsy che stava nella torre più alta(9)
vide il padre che ritornava cavalcando.
IX
“O padre, padre (10)
non darmi la colpa
sono stati la nutrice falsa e Lankin che hanno ucciso tuo figlio.
O padre padre,
non darmi la colpa
sono stati la nutrice falsa e Lankin che hanno ucciso la tua Lady.”
X
Così Lankin è stato impiccato sulla forca più alta
e la falsa nutrice fu bruciata nel falò vicino

NOTE
1) nella versione dei Fire + Ice dicono “And make sure theres no crack for him to creep in” e nel verso successivo “through a gap in the window long lankin crept in” mentre The Wainwright Sisters inframmezzano “So he kissed his fair lady and he rode away, And he was in fair London before the break of day.”
2) la nutrice è detta falsa perchè è complice di Lambertuccio, è inoltre un surrogato di madre ma in chiave negativa. E’ lei ad aver lasciato aperta la finestra
3) nella versione dei Fire + Ice dicono
“Where’s the lady of the household? cries Long Lankin.
She’s asleep in her chamber, says the false nurse to him.”
e proseguono: Where’s the heir of the household? cries Long Lankin.
He’s asleep in his cradle, says the false nurse to him.
4) in alcune versioni Lamkin dondola la culla mentre accoltella il bambino. Lo scopo della tortura al bambino inizialmente non è l’uccisione ma l’esca per far scendere la madre
5) il catino o la bacinella in cui viene raccolto il sangue è altrove specificato d’argento. Così Riccardo Venturi mette in evidenza “La grande cura di Lambertuccio nel raccogliere il sangue di Lady Wearie in una bacinella d’argento ci ricorda Sir Hugh [qui]; qui, però, non si tratta di usare il sangue come rimedio o come filtro per riti magici, bensì di evitare che del sangue aristocratico coli per il pavimento, un’indegnità punita con l’anima trasportata all’inferno in un fiume di sangue. Il recipiente per tale sangue è tradizionalmente d’argento” Ma in Jamieson (Child #94 versione A) la balia interviene, osservando “il sangue dei ricchi è uguale a quello dei poveri”, (molto sovversivo!!)
Secondo Anne Gilchrist il nome Lamkin / Lammikin sta a indicare un incarnato biancastro come quello dei lebbrosi e descrive che una cura medievale per la malattia era quella del bagno nel sangue di un bambino raccolto in una bacinella d’argento.
6) nella versione dei Fire + Ice proseguono la strofa con
How dare I come down in the dead of the night
When no candle is burning and no fires alight?
e concludono
But, the lady came downstairs, aware of no harm
Lankin stood ready to catch her in his arm
There’s blood in the kitchen, there’s blood in the hall,
There’s blood in the parlour where mylady did fall.
There’s blood in the parlour where the lady did fall.
7) qui si accenna allo stupro. In alcune versioni Lamkin è un amante respinto (o un predatore sessuale) che si vendica sulla donna, oppure semplicemente un ladruncolo o un border reiver
8) la figlia viene offerta come moglie, non come vittima sacrificale insieme a una ricca dote
9) in alcune versioni Lamkin costringe Betsy a reggere il catino in cui cola il sangue della madre, in questa invece lei resta rinserrata nella stanza più in alto della torre,  in disperata attesa del ritorno del padre.
10) nella verione delle Wainwright Sisters è una serva che dice “O master don’t lay the blame on me” accusando la nutrice e Lankin di aver ucciso la castellana.

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span in Commoner’s Crown 1975. Un arrangiamento strumentale indubbiamente “datato”


I
Said the lord unto his lady as he rode over the moss,
“Beware of Long Lankin that lives amongst the gorse.
Beware the moss, beware the moor, beware of Long Lankin.
Be sure the doors are bolted well lest Lankin should creep in.”
II
Said the lord unto his lady as he rode away,
“Beware of Long Lankin that lives amongst the hay.
Beware the moss, beware the moor, beware of Long Lankin.
Be sure the doors are bolted well lest Lankin should creep in.”
III
“Where’s the master of the house?” says Long Lankin.
“He’s away to London,” says the nurse to him.
“Where’s the lady of the house?” says Long Lankin.
“She’s up in her chamber,” says the nurse to him.
“Where’s the baby of the house?” says Long Lankin.
“He’s asleep in the cradle,” says the nurse to him.
IV
“We will pinch him, we will prick him, we will stab him with a pin.
And the nurse shall hold the basin for the blood all to run in.”
So they pinched him, then they pricked him, then they stabbed him with a pin.
And the false nurse held the basin for the blood all to run in.
V
“Lady, come down the stairs,” says Long Lankin.
“How can I see in the dark?” she says unto him.
“You have silver mantles,” says Long Lankin,
“Lady, come down the stairs by the light of them.”
Down the stairs the lady came thinking no harm,
Lankin he stood ready to catch her in his arm.

VI
There was blood all in the kitchen, there was blood all in the hall.
There was blood all in the parlour where my lady she did fall.
Now Long Lankin shall be hanged from the gallows oh so high.
And the false nurse shall be burned in the fire close by.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Disse il lord alla sua lady mentre cavalcava per la palude
“Attenta a Long Lankin che vive  tra la ginestra
attenta alla palude e alla brughiera,
attenta a Long Lankin
attenta che le porte siano serrate bene
o Lankin potrebbe strisciare dentro”
II
Disse il lord alla sua lady mentre cavalcava lontano
” Attenta a Long Lakin che vive
nei campi di fieno
attenta alla palude e alla brughiera,
attenta a Long Lankin
attenta che le porte siano serrate bene
o Lankin potrebbe strisciare dentro”
III
“Dovè il Lord della casa?”
– dice Long Lankin
“E’ fuori a Londra” –
dice la balia
” Dov’è la signora della casa?”
– dice Long Lankin
“E’ nella sua stanza”
dice la balia
” Dov’è il bambino della casa?”
dice Long Lankin
“Dorme nella sua stanza”
dice la balia
IV
Lo infilzeremo, lo pungeremo;
lo trafiggeremo con uno spillo
e la balia deve tenere la bacinella perchè il sangue ci coli dentro”
Così lo infilzarono,
lo punsero
lo trafissero con uno spillo
e la falsa balia teneva la bacinella perchè il sangue ci colasse dentro
V
“Signora scendete le scale”
dice Long Lankin
“Come posso vedere nel buio?
dice lei
“Hai mantelli d’argento”
dice Long Lankin
“Signora scendi le scale con la loro lucentezza”
La dama scese le scale pensando di non essere in pericolo
ma Lankin la stava aspettando per prenderla tra le braccia
VI
C’era sangue in cucina,
sangue nella sala
c’era sangue nel salotto
dove la Lady cadde.
Ora Long Lanking sarà impiccato sulla forca più alta
e la falsa nutrice sarà bruciata nel falò vicino

FONTI
https://singout.org/2016/11/14/lamkin-a-most-brutal-bloody-ballad/
https://singout.org/2016/11/14/lamkin-a-most-brutal-bloody-ballad/3/

http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/longlankin.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_93
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19415
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52123
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52406
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/12/lamkin.htm
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/29-lamkin-.aspx
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/lamkin.htm
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=9416&printpreview=1&lang=it
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=9416&lang=it#agg21945
http://jonandrika.org/wp/articles/lamkin-terror-of-nurseries/
http://www.efdss.org/efdss-education/resource-bank/resources-and-teaching-tools/false-lamkin-teaching-notes-for-key-stages-2-and-3
http://www.enidporterproject.org.uk/content/villages/littleport/song-littleport-man

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://arandadill.tumblr.com/post/83062543466/said-the-lord-unto-his-lady-as-he-rode-over-the

THE BANKS OF THE RED ROSES

La ballata popolare “The Banks of the (Red) Roses” di fine Ottocento, è nota in due versioni, diametralmente opposte, quella irlandese come love song ricca di irish humour e quella scozzese come murder ballad. Come sempre quando ci sono versioni simili tra le due sponde si apre la querelle di quale sia venuto prima.. ma come sia accaduto che i testi vadano a raccontare una storia diversa è un mistero!
Distinguere le due versioni è semplice, quella scozzese ha una melodia triste e malinconica quella irlandese è invece allegra.

CURIOSITA’
‘Rosa banksiae
è la ” Lady Banks Rose” una rosa antica di tipo rampicante, arrivata dalla Cina solo nel 1807, dal nome di Lady Dorothea Banks moglie del botanico inglese Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) curatore dei Kew Gardens di Londra, dalla fioritura precoce già ad aprile con piccoli fiori, ma abbondanti e non molto profumati riuniti a mazzetti, però di colore.. giallo!

LA VERSIONE MURDER BALLAD

Questa versione appartiene al genere delle murder ballads (le ballate degli omicidi) o come si direbbe oggi i fatti della cronaca nera.

murderQui la storia tra i due innamorati vira sul “gotico” e diventa una storia di seduzione e omicidio. Il giovanotto prima si diverte con la fanciulla (in alcune versione di nome Mary o Molly) e dopo averla messa incinta, invece di limitarsi a lasciarla (secondo il tipico comportamento dei mascalzoni) decide di ucciderla: l’omicidio però non segue l’impulso del momento, ma è premeditato e ciò getta sulla storia una luce sinistra e perversa.

Chi narra la storia sembra voler dare un avvertimento alla ragazze: quelle “facili” che invece di pensare al lavoro onesto preferiscono divertirsi nei boschi, finiscono immancabilmente per incontrare il lupo cattivo e fare una brutta fine!!
Sembra inoltre che la ragazza della storia sia anche una di quelle “nagging” che borbottano in continuazione, perché devono sempre dire la loro, o che non sono mai contente! E quindi si meritano doppiamente di fare una brutta fine!!
Di certo il “lovely” Johnny era un gran mascalzone e pur di non essere coinvolto nella scandalo di una gravidanza non desiderata, ha preferito “metterci una pietra sopra” (scavando prima una buca bella profonda). Anche la versione murder ballad della storia è relativamente popolare in Irlanda, così nella proposta d’ascolto si mescolano artisti della scena scozzese e irlandese

Battlefield Band in Happy Daze 2001 con la voce di Karine Polwart ; qui in sole tre strofe di cui una utilizzata come ritornello, si condensa tutta la storia: i due che si sollazzano  tra le canne in riva al fiume, lei che si lamenta perchè vuole essere sposata, lui che la pugnala al cuore e la lascia sulla riva a colorare di rosso sangue le rose.


CHORUS
On the banks of red roses
my love and I sat down
he  took out his charmed box
to play his love a tune.
In the middle of the tune
she sighed and she said,
“Oh my Johnny, lovely Johnny
(it’s) dinna leave me?”
I
Oh, when I was with him
and easy led astray.
afore I would work,
I would rather sport and play
afore I would work
I would rather sport and play
With my Johnny
on the banks of red roses.
II
Johnny met his true love
they went for a walk
he pulled (3) out his penknife,
it was  long and sharp,
he has percing through and through
the bonny lassie’s heart.
And he left her there among the roses.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
Coro
Sulle rive delle rose rosse
il mio amore ed io ci sedevamo
e lui prendeva il suo organetto incantato (1) e suonava per l’amata. Nel mezzo della melodia
sospirò e disse:
“Johnny, mio caro Johnny non mi mollare!”
I
Quando ero con lui,
finita sulla cattiva strada,
invece di lavorare
preferivo divertirmi e cantare
e invece di lavorare
preferivo divertirmi e cantare
con il mio Johnny
sulle rive delle rose rosse (2)
II
Johnny incontrò la sua innamorata
e andarono a passeggiare,
tirò fuori il pugnale,
che era  lungo e affilato,
e trafisse da parte a parte
il cuore della bella ragazza
e la lasciò là,  distesa tra le rose (4)

NOTE
1) lo strumento musicale varia tra la gamma degli strumenti popolari del tempo: è un organetto o un flauto o un violino, ma chiaramente si tratta di un “piffero” ben più in carne; è sottinteso il doppio senso “to play his love a tune” equivale alla perdita della verginità della fanciulla
2) Il motivo della gravidanza non è esplicito, le rose nelle canzoni celtiche sono spesso associate alla sfortuna e stanno a indicare una gravidanza in atto. (ad esempio in Ye Banks and Breas)
3) non usa proprio lo stesso verbo , ma non capisco la parola
4) niente fossa e occultamento del cadavere come invece apprendiamo dalle versioni più estese.

Sarah Makem in Ulster Ballad Singer- 1968 (salta la III strofa) “In contrast to the light and airy theme of The Banks of Red Roses (Irish Street Ballads, No.8), Mrs. Makem’s song is a dark story of seduction and premeditated murder, on the lines of The Cruel Ship Carpenter, with which it should be compared. (English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians. Vol. 1, pp 317-327). See also E.F.S. Journal Vol. II, p 254. The tune is Doh Mode Hexatonic.”(tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA De Danann 1977 (inizia con la II strofa e poi passa alla I)

ASCOLTA June Tabor in Aqaba 1988: una melodia tristissima, il canto un lamento nel “vecchio stile”


I
Oh, when I was a young girl
I heard my mother say
That I was a foolish lass
and easy led astray.
And before I would work,
I would rather sport and play
With my Johnny on the banks of red roses.
II
On the banks of red roses
my love and I sat down
And he pulled out his charm flute
and played his lass a tune.
In the middle of the tune
well the bonny lassie cried,
“Oh Johnny, lovely Johnny would you leave me?”
III
So he took her to his cabin
where he treated her to tea
Saying “Drink my dearest Mary
and come along with me”
Saying “Drink my dearest Mary
and come along with me
To the bonny bonny banks of Red Roses”
IV
Well, they walked and they talked
till they came unto a cave
Where Johnny all the day
had been digging up a grave,
Where Johnny all the day
had been digging up a grave
For to leave his lassie low among the roses.
V
Then he pulled out a penknife,
it was both long and sharp,
And he plunged it right into
his own dear Mary’s heart.
And he plunged it right into
his own dear Mary’s heart
And he left her lying low among the roses.
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane
mia madre mi diceva
che ero una ragazza sciocca
e facilmente condotta all’errore;
e invece di lavorare
preferivo  divertirmi e cantare
con il mio Johnny sulle rive delle rose rosse
II
Sulle rive delle rose rosse
il mio amore ed io ci sedevamo
e lui prendeva il suo flauto incantato
e suonava per la sua ragazza (1).
Nel mezzo della melodia
la bella ragazza gridò:
“Johnny, amato Johnny mi vuoi mollare?”
III
Così la portò nella sua stanza
dove le preparò del te
dicendo “Bevi mia cara Mary
e vieni con me”
dicendo “Bevi mia cara Mary
e vieni con me
alle belle, belle rive delle rose rosse”
IV
Allora s’incamminarono e parlarono
fino a quando arrivarono a una grotta
dove Johnny tutto il giorno
aveva scavato una fossa,
dove Johnny tutto il giorno
aveva scavato una fossa,
per lasciare la sua piccola ragazza giù tra le rose.
V
Poi tirò fuori uno stiletto,
era tanto lungo e affilato
e lo piantò dritto nel cuore
della sua cara Mary.
e lo piantò dritto nel cuore
della sua cara Mary.
e la lasciò distesa tra le rose

In quest’altra versione testuale si aggiunge una nota “spooky” con lo spettro della fidanzata che lo tormenta (ovvero il rimorso della coscienza) !!

ASCOLTA Alasdair Roberts in  “No Earthly Man” (2005)


I
When I was a wee thing,
I heard my mother say
That I was a rambler
and easy led astray
before that I would work,
I would rather sport and play
With my Johnny on the banks of red roses
II
On the banks of red roses,
my love and I sat down
He took out his tuning box
to play his love a tune
In the middle of the tune,
his love got up and cried
saying “Oh Johnny, Johnny,
will you go on and leave me?”
III
And they walked and they talked
till they came up to a cave
Where the night before her Johnny he had been digging at her grave
Where the night before her Johnny he had been digging at her grave
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of red roses
IV
“Oh Johnny, dearest Johnny,
that grave’s not meant for me.”
“Oh yes, my dearest Molly,
that your bridal bed shall be.
Oh yes, my dearest Molly,
that your bridal bed shall be.”
And he’s laid her down low on red roses.
V
That night while walking home,
his heart was full of fear,
And everyone he met, he thought it was his dear.
And everyone he met, he thought it was his dear
He had slain on the banks of red roses.
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero una ragazzina
mia madre mi diceva
che ero una vagabonda
finita sulla cattiva strada,
invece di lavorare
preferivo divertirmi e cantare
con il mio Johnny sulle rive delle rose rosse
II
Sulle rive delle rose rosse
il mio amore ed io ci sedevamo
e lui prese l’organetto
e suonò per il suo amore,
nel mezzo della melodia
il suo amore si alzò e gridò:
“Johnny, amato Johnny
te ne vuoi andare e lasciarmi?”
III
Allora camminarono e parlarono
fino a quando arrivarono a una grotta
dove la notte prima Johnny aveva scavato una fossa,
dove la notte prima Johnny aveva scavato una fossa,
sulle belle, belle  rive delle rose rosse
IV
“O Johnny, mio caro Johnny,
quella tomba non è per me?!”,
“O si cara, mia cara Molly,
questa sarà il tuo letto nunziale
O si, mia cara Molly,
questa sarà il tuo letto nunziale
e la lasciò a terra distesa tra le rose rosse.
V
Quella notte mentre tornava a casa,
il suo cuore era pieno di paura
e tutti quelli che incontrava,
credeva fossero la sua amata
e tutti quelli che incontrava,
credeva fossero la sua amata
che aveva lasciato distesa tra le rose rosse

La ballata è stata d’ispirazione alla murder ballad scritta da Nick Cave “Where The Wild Roses Grow

 

continua versione irlandese

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/thebanksofredroses.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/bkofredr.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/roses.html

NEVER WEDD AN OLD MAN

Read the post in English  

Una canzone umoristica scozzese,  “Maids When You’re Young Never Wed An Old Man” o più semplicemente “Maids When You’re Young“, scoraggia le giovani donne  nello sposare uomini troppo anziani, e il suo canto, tra ironia e amarezza, è un monito per tutte.
maidenLa grande differenza d’età tre i due sposi era ancora una consuetudine fino alla metà del 1900: uomini anziani sposavano giovani ventenni, che svolgevano il ruolo di badanti ante litteram!

L’umorismo della canzone  scaturisce dal linguaggio allusivo ma mai esplicito e le parole più oscene  sono bippate come “faloorum” e “ding doorum”: dapprima la giovane donna è corteggiata dall’uomo più vecchio ed accetta di sposarlo, ma quando arriva il momento di andare a  letto scopre che l’uomo ahimè è impotente. Così appena il vecchio si addormenta la ragazza, per spegnere i  bollori, si getta nelle braccia di un giovane e virile amante.

Oggi la canzone  fa sorridere ma nell’Ottocento era considerata piuttosto piccante: la semplice allusione  al sesso era volgare ma il riferimento all’impotenza e all’adulterio doveva  risultare scandaloso! Nonostante tutto diventò una canzone popolare in  Scozia, Inghilterra, Irlanda  e in America. La prima  pubblicazione risale al 1869 in “Ancient   Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads” di David Herd con il titolo “Scant of Love, Want of Love”.

Quando i Dubliners la  registrarono nel 1962 fu considerata troppo esplicitamente sessuale per le radio del servizio pubblico inglese .

The Dubliners (strofe 1-3-4-5-6-7)


 Mairi  Morrison & Alasdair Roberts in Urstan, 2012 (strofe 1-2-4-3) in  una versione più castigata. Il cd è stato commissionato dal Scotland’s Centre for Contemporary Arts come tributo alla musica e  cultura gaelica. Una collaborazione artistica che sprizza freschezza e creatività.

Lucy Ward in “Adelphi Has to Fly” 2011 e la sua grinta


CHORUS
For he’s got no faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum

He’s got no faloorum,
fadidle  all day
He’s got no faloorum,
he’s lost his ding doorum
so maids when you’re young,
never wed an old man

I
An old man  came courting me,
hey ding dooram day (1)
An old man came courting me,
me being Young(2)
An old man came courting me,
all for to  marry me(3)
Maids, when you’re young never wed an old man
II
When we sat down to tea,
hey doo me darrity
When we sat down to tea, me being young
When we sat down to tea, he started teasing me
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
III
When we went to church,
hey ding dooram day
When we went to church,
me being young
When we went to church,
he left me in the lurch (4)
Maids when you’re young, never wed an old man
IV
When we went to bed,
hey ding doorum day
When we went to bed, me being young
When we went to bed,
he lay like he was dead (5)
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
V
So I threw me leg  over him (6),
hey ding dorum da
I flung me leg over him, me being young
I flung me leg over him, damned nearly smothered him
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man.
VI
When he went to sleep,
hey ding doorum day
When he went to sleep, me being young
When he went to sleep, out of bed I did creep
Into the arms of a handsome young man
VII
And I found his faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum
I found his faloorum,
fadidle all day
I found his faloorum, he got my ding doorum
So maids when you’re young never wed  an old man
VIII
I wish this old man would die,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
I wish this old man would die, me being Young
I wish this old man would die, I’d make the  money fly
Girls, for your sake, never wed an old man
IX
A young man is my delight,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
A young man is my delight, me being Young
A young man is my delight, he’ll kiss you day  and night
Maids, when you’re young, never wed an old  man
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
CORO
Perché lui non è ” faloorum”,
fadidle eye-oorum
lui non è ” faloorum”,
fadidle  all day
lui non è ” faloorum”
lui ha perso il suo “ding doorum”
così ragazze, se siete giovani,
non sposate mai un vecchio!
I
Un vecchio mi corteggiava
hey ding dooram day
Un vecchio mi corteggiava ed io ero giovane,
Un vecchio mi corteggiava per sposarmi,
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio.
II
Quando ci sedemmo per il te,
hey doo me darrity
Quando ci sedemmo per il te,
ed io ero giovane,
quando ci sedemmo per il te, lui cominciò a stuzzicarmi.
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio.
III
Quando andammo in chiesa
hey ding dooram day
quando andammo in chiesa
ed io ero giovane,
quando andammo in chiesa,
mi ha piantato in asso,
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio.
IV
Quando andammo a letto
hey ding doorum day
quando andammo a letto ed io ero giovane,
quando andammo a letto, rimase disteso come morto.
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio.
V
Così mi sono messa cavalcioni (6),
hey ding dorum da
mi sono messa cavalcioni ed io ero giovane,
mi sono messa cavalcioni e maledizione per poco lo soffocavo.
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio.
VI
Quando si addormentò
hey ding doorum day
quando si addormentò  ed io ero giovane,
quando si addormentò strisciai fuori dal letto
nelle braccia di un bel giovane!
VII
E ho trovato il suo ” faloorum”,
fadidle eye-oorum
ho trovato il suo ” faloorum”,
fadidle all day
ho trovato il suo ” faloorum ” e ha preso la mia “ding doorum”
così ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio!
VIII
Vorrei che il vecchio morisse,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
vorrei che il vecchio morisse ed io essere giovane,
vorrei che il vecchio morisse, potrei spendere i soldi,
ragazze per il vostro bene, non sposate mai un vecchio!
IX
Un uomo giovane è la mia gioia,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
un uomo giovane è la mia gioia ed io sono giovane,
un uomo giovane è la mia gioia, lo bacerei notte e giorno,
ragazze, se siete giovani, non sposate mai un vecchio!

NOTE
1) oppure “Hey do a dority”
2) oppure Hey-do-a-day
3) oppure Fain wad he mairry me
4) in altre versioni è la donna ad andarsene ” I left him in the lurch”
5) oppure “he neither done nor said”, ma anche” he lays like a lump of lead”
6) letteralmente: ho buttato la mia gamba su di lui

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/anoldmancamecourting.html
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/
never_wed_an_old_man_pmcnamara.htm

http://sangstories.webs.com/anauldmancamcourtin.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/m/maidswhe.html