Archivi tag: Admiral Benbow

Admiral Benbow ballads

Leggi in italiano

The heroic exploits of Admiral John Benbow (1653-1702) are sung in some contemporary ballads dating back to the days of the Spanish Civil War. He was called “the Brother Tar” because he started his military carrier from below, as a simple sailor; thanks to his ingenuity, the courage and help of his mentor Admiral Arthur Herbert, Count of Torrington.
His activity, except for a parenthesis in which he gave himself to the merchant navy (1686-1689), was dedicated to the Royal Navy. He left the army the degree of master, after being brought before the court martial because of a dispute against an officer, it should be noted that the code of conduct between the officers was very rigid (and even today with military degrees there is little to joke) and after having brought his public apology to Captain Booth of the Adventure and repaid the fine with three months of work without pay, Benbow decided to resign. The following year he became the owner of the frigate Benbow roamed the Mediterranean and the English Channel hunting for pirates, earning the reputation of a skilled and ruthless captain. Returning to the navy in 1689 with the rank of third lieutenant on the Elizabeth, after four months he obtained the rank of commander of the York and he distinguished himself in the naval actions along the French coasts; he was then sent to the West Indies to eradicate piracy and in 1701 he was appointed vice-admiral. It is said that King William had offered the command to several gentlemen who refused (because of the climate) and so he exclaimed “I understand, we will spare the gentlemen and we will send to the Antilles the honest Benbow”

Tarpaulin&Gentleman

In the early English Navy there was a system of voluntary training: a captain used to take care of young boy and instruct them as long as they were unable to pass the aptitude test. However, there remained a dividing line between the tarpaulin officer, without a high social status and the gentleman officer, the privileged aspirant. In fact, the gentlemen obtained their license of ensign more for relationships of kinships that for merits, so that in 1677 it was introduced an entrance examination that had to precede a compulsory three-year training. But in 1730 they preferred to return to the old system of voluntary training.

THE LAST BATTLE

His last action, off the coast of Cape Santa Marta , was against Admiral Jean Du Casse and his fleet: from 19 to 25 August 1702; Benbow had seven ships at his command but his captains proved unwilling to obey orders: only on the afternoon of the first day a fight was waged and only the flagship and the Ruby under captain George Walton chased French ships with the intent to give battle, while the other english ships were kept out. The Ruby was put out of action on the 22nd and at this point the Falmouth in command of Samuel Vincent decided to line up with Benbow, but it was seriously damaged and forced to retreat, the same Benbow besieged by the French ships and subjected to a cannon shot had a mangled leg and he was brought below deck, where a war council was held with his officers who had all gathered together on board the flagship.
To see the war action in detail see

from Master and Commander

Benbow was determined to pursuit of battle, but his captains, believing they had no chance of victory, recommended him merely of pursuing the French ships: Benbow, convinced that a mutiny was being carried out against him, gave the order to return in Jamaica and sent his commanders beheind the court martial on charges of insubordination; Captain Richard Kirby and Captain Cooper Wade were found guilty and shot. Despite the amputation of his leg Benbow died two months after the battle and was buried in Kingston.

ADMIRAL BENBOW BY CECIL SHARP

The melody is equally popular and it is shared with the Captain Kidd ballad giving life to a melodic family used for various songs.
Among the songs of the sea in the series Sea Shanty Edition for the fourth episode of the video game Assassin’s Creed that include some ballads about the brave captains, to celebrate the victories or heroic deeds that led them to death.
The version in Assassin’s Creed from the text transcribed by Cecil Sharp on the song of Captain Lewis of Minehead (1906) the strophes, however, are halved (I, II, VI)

I
Come all you seamen bold
and draw near, and draw near
Come all you seamen bold and draw near
It’s of an Admiral’s fame Brave Benbow (1) was his name
How he sailed up on the main (2)
you shall hear, you shall hear
II
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight, for to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail in a keen and pleasant gale
But his captains they turn’d tail in a fright (3), in a fright
III
Says Kirby unto Wade (4), “We will run, we will run.”
Says Kirby unto Wade, “We will run. For I value no disgrace
nor the losing of my place
But the enemy I won’t face
Nor his guns, nor his guns.”
IV
The Ruby (5) and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
The Ruby and Benbow Fought the French.
They fought them up and down
‘Til the blood came trickling down
‘Til the blood came trickling down Where they lay, where they lay.
V
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs
“Fight on, my English lads
‘Tis our lot, ‘tis our lot.”
VI
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried, Benbow cried
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried
“Let a cradle now in haste on the quarterdeck (6) be placed
That the enemy I may face
‘Til I die, ‘Til I die
Mary Evans Picture Library : J R Skelton in Lang, “Outposts of Empire” 1910

NOTES
1) Benbow made his career in the ranks of the Royal Navy in the late 1600s until he became Vice-Admiral
2) the West Indian Sea
3) in a fright: panicked
4) the captains who left the battle were tried and sentenced to death by desertion
5) the Ruby supported the attack of the flagship Breda against the French vessels
6) Benbow despite the injured leg (which will be amputated) wants to continue to give orders on the bridge and so requires a cradle to be able to remain seated and stretch the leg crushed, provisionally bandaged by the doctor

COPPER FAMILY VERSION

Paul Clayton, from “Whaling and sailing songs from the days of Moby Dick” 1954

I
It was often at Marais
Calling Benbow by his name
He fought on the raging main
You must know
Oh, the ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay
II
‘Twas Reuben (1) and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
‘Twas Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French,
Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight ye on, me English lads
‘Tis my lot, ’tis my lot
III
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried, Benbow cried
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried,
Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed
That the enemy I might face
‘Til I die, ’til I die
IV
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died, Benbow died
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church (2)
There he lay, there he lay

NOTES
1) the Ruby supported the attack of the flagship Breda against the French vessels
2) he was buried in the Parish Church of Kingston (Jamaica)

ADMIRAL BENBOW BY WILLIAM CHAPPELL

Entitled “Benbow, the Brother Tar’s song” the ballad was written by William Chappel in his “Old English Popular Music”.
“The tune is a variant of Love Will Find Out the Way, first published in 1651. Originally, it circulated in the world of fashion, but after 1680 it seems to have passed almost exclusively into the keeping of agricultural workers. Chappell collected it from hop-pickers in the mid nineteenth century, and Lucy Broadwood found it in Sussex in 1898.” (from here)
The action is very inaccurate (see above)
June Tabor & Martin Simpson from A cut above, 1982

I
We sailed from Virginia
and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our shipping
and then we weighed all.
Full in view on the seas, boys,
seven sails we did espy;
We mannéd our capstans
and weighed speedily.
II
Now the first we come up with was a brigantine sloop (1)
And we asked if the others was as big as they looked;
Ah, but turning to windward,
as near as we could lie
We saw there were ten (2) men of war cruising by.
III
We drew up our squadron in very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time;
But the day being spent, boys, and the night a-coming on
We left them alone till the early next morn.
IV
Now the very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot;
And as he was wounded to his merry men he did say,
“Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away!”
V
Now the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly,
But brave Admiral Benbow for help would not cry;
“Take me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts,
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts.”
VI
Now, the very next morning by break of the day
They hoisted their topsails and so bore away;
We bore to Port Royal where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church (3).
VII
Come all you brave fellows, wherever you’ve been,
Let us drink to the health of our King and our Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance (4) of great Admiral Benbow.

NOTES
1) the French fleet under the command of Admiral Du Casse was escorting a convoy of troops, the flagship Breda captured the Anne, originally an English ship captured by the French
2) they were actually only 5
3) Benbow was buried in the Parish Church of Kingston (Jamaica)
4) in his honor Robert Louis Stevenson in his book “Treasure Island” inserts an “Admiral Benbow Inn” at the beginning of the story

LINK
https://www.historytoday.com/sam-willis/dark-side-admiral-benbow
http://bravebenbow.com/
http://bravebenbow.com/?page_id=136
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=137
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2169
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=109642
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56280
http://reelyredd.com/admiral-benbow-song.htm

https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/admiralbenbow.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/admiralbenbow.html

Le ballate dell’ammiraglio Benbow

Read the post in English

Le gesta eroiche dell’Ammiraglio John Benbow (1653-1702) sono cantate in alcune ballate coeve risalenti ai tempi della Guerra di secessione spagnola. Era chiamato “the Brother Tar” perchè diede la scalata alla catena del comando militare dal basso, come semplice marinaio; grazie al suo ingegno, al coraggio e all’aiuto del suo mentore l’ammiraglio Arthur  Herbert, Conte di Torrington.
La sua attività, tranne una parentesi in cui si diede al commercio privato (1686-1689), fu dedicata alla marina militare. Lasciò la marina con il gradi di luogonentente (master, cioè l’ufficiale di rotta) dopo essere stato portato davanti alla corte marziale a causa di una battutaccia contro un ufficiale, c’è da rilevare che il codice di comportamento tra gli ufficiali era molto rigido (e ancora oggi con i gradi militari c’è ben poco da scherzare) e dopo aver porto le sue pubbliche scuse al capitano Booth dell’Adventure e ripagato la multa con tre mesi di lavoro senza paga, Benbow pensò bene di dimettersi. L’anno successivo diventato proprietario della fregata Benbow scorazzò per il mediterraneo e nel canale della Manica a caccia di pirati guadagnandosi la fama di capitano abile e spietato.  Rientrato nel giungo del 1689 nella marina militare con il grado di terzo luogotenente sull’ Elizabeth,  dopo nemmeno quattro mesi ottenne il grado di comandante della York e si distinse nelle azioni navali contro le coste francesi; venne mandato poi nelle Indie Occidentali a debellare la pirateria  e nel 1701 fu nominato vice-ammiraglio. Si dice che re Guglielmo avesse offerto il comando a parecchi gentlemen che però rifiutarono (a causa del clima) e così esclamò “Ho capito, risparmieremo i damerini e manderemo alle Antille l’onesto Benbow”

Tarpaulin&Gentleman

Nella Marina inglese degli inizi vigeva il sistema dell’addestramento volontario: un capitano prendeva al servizio dei giovani e li istruiva fintanto che non fossero in grado di superare l’esame attitudinale. Restava comunque una linea di demarcazione tra il tarpaulin officer, privo di alto status sociale e il gentleman officer, l’aspirante privilegiato. Di fatto i gentlemen ottenevano la loro patente di guardiamarina più per relazioni di parentele a fronte di una preparazione in mare superficiale, cosicchè nel 1677 fu introdotto un esame di ammissione che doveva precedere un addestramento di tre anni obbligatorio (oppure il candidato doveva avere già fatto esperienza nella marina mercantile). Ma nel 1730 si preferì ritornare al vecchio sistema dell’addestramento volontario.

L’ULTIMA BATTAGLIA

La sua ultima battaglia, al largo di Capo Santa Marta sulle coste dell’attuale Colombia,  fu quella ingaggiata contro l’ammiraglio Jean Du Casse e la sua flotta: la battaglia con relativo inseguimento durò dal 19 al 25 agosto 1702; Benbow aveva al suo comando sette navi ma i suoi capitani si dimostrarono poco propensi ad ubbidire agli ordini: solo nel pomeriggio del primo giorno venne ingaggiato un combattimento e solo la nave ammiraglia e la Ruby sotto il capitano George Walton si diedero all’inseguimento delle navi francesi con l’intento di dare battaglia mentre le altre navi si mantenevano defilate. La Ruby fu messa fuori combattimento il 22 e a questo punto la Falmouth  al comando di Samuel Vincent decise di schierarsi con Benbow, ma venne seriamente danneggiata e costretta a ritirarsi, lo stesso Benbow assediato dalle navi francesi e sottoposto a una bordata di cannonate si trovò con una gamba maciullata e venne portato sottocoperta, dove si tenne un consiglio di guerra con i suoi ufficiali nel frattempo riunitisi tutti a bordo dell’ammiraglia.
Per vedere in dettaglio l’azione di guerra vedi qui

dal film Master and Commander

Benbow era determinato a proseguire l’inseguimento per dar battaglia ma i suoi capitani ritenendo di non avere possibilità di vittoria raccomandavano di limitarsi a inseguire le navi francesi: Benbow convinto che si stesse mettendo in atto un ammutinamento nei suoi confrontii diede l’ordine di tornare in Giamaica e mandò i suoi comandanti davanti alla corte marziale con l’accusa di insubordinazione; il capitano Richard Kirby e il capitano Cooper Wade vennero riconosciuti colpevoli e fucilati. Nonostante l’amputazione della gamba  Benbow morì due mesi dopo la battaglia e venne sepolto a Kingston.

ADMIRAL BENBOW DI CECIL SHARP

La melodia è altrettanto popolare e si accomuna alla ballata Captain Kidd dando vita a una sorta di famiglia melodica utilizzata per varie canzoni.
Tra le canzoni del mare nella serie Sea Shanty Edition per il quarto episodio del video-gioco Assassin’s Creed si annoverano alcune ballate sui capitani coraggiosi, per celebrarne le vittorie o le gesta eroiche che li hanno portati alla morte.
La versione in Assassin’s Creed dal testo trascritto da Cecil Sharp sul canto del Capitano Lewis di Minehead (1906) le strofe però sono dimezzate (I, II, VI)


I
Come all you seamen bold
and draw near, and draw near
Come all you seamen bold and draw near
It’s of an Admiral’s fame Brave Benbow (1) was his name
How he sailed up on the main (2)
you shall hear, you shall hear
II
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight, for to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail in a keen and pleasant gale
But his captains they turn’d tail in a fright (3), in a fright
III
Says Kirby unto Wade (4), “We will run, we will run.”
Says Kirby unto Wade, “We will run. For I value no disgrace
nor the losing of my place
But the enemy I won’t face
Nor his guns, nor his guns.”
IV
The Ruby (5) and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
The Ruby and Benbow Fought the French.
They fought them up and down
‘Til the blood came trickling down
‘Til the blood came trickling down Where they lay, where they lay.
V
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs
“Fight on, my English lads
‘Tis our lot, ‘tis our lot.”
VI
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried, Benbow cried
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried
“Let a cradle now in haste on the quarterdeck (6) be placed
That the enemy I may face
‘Til I die, ‘Til I die
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Bravi marinai venite tutti più vicino, più vicino,
Bravi marinai venite tutti
più vicino,
vi voglio raccontare del coraggioso Ammiraglio Benbow
di come navigava in mare
ascoltate, ascoltate.
II
Il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
per lottare, per lottare
il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
per lottare,
il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
con un vento forte di burrasca
ma i suoi capitani fuggirono per vigliaccheria , per vigliaccheria.
III
Disse Kirby a Wade “Scappiamo
scappiamo”
Disse Kirby a Wade “Scappiamo
perchè non valuto il disonore
o la perdita della mia posizione,
ma i nemici non voglio affrontare
e nemmeno i loro cannoni, i cannoni”
IV
La Ruby e Benbow combattevano  i francesi, combattevano i francesi.  la Ruby e Benbow combattevano francesi
li combatterono in lungo e in largo
finchè il sangue iniziò a sgorgare
finchè il sangue iniziò a sgorgare,
à dove stavano, là dove stavano
V
Il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, per un colpo di cannone,
il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, per un colpo di cannone
il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, e sulle stampelle implora
” Combattete, inglesi
è il nostro destino, il nostro destino”
VI
Il chirurgo fasciò le sue ferite
Benbow gridò, Benbow gridò
Il chirurgo fasciò le sue ferite
Benbow gridò
“Portatemi subito una culla
e mettetela sul cassero
che i nemici combatterò
fino alla morte, fino alla morte.”
Mary Evans Picture Library : J R Skelton in Lang, “Outposts of Empire” 1910

NOTE
1) Benbow fece carriera nei ranghi della Marina Inglese sul finire del 1600 fino a diventare Vice-Ammiraglio
2) il mare delle Indie Occidentali
3) in a fright: in preda al panico
4) i capitani che abbandonarono la battaglia vennero processati e condannati a morte per diserzione
5) la nave Ruby sostenne l’attacco  dell’ammiraglia Breda contro i vascelli francesi
6) Benbow nonostante la gamba ferita (che gli verrà amputata) vuole continuare a impartire gli ordini  sul ponte di comando e così richiede una culla per poter restare seduto e distendere la gamba maciullata, fasciata in modo provvisorio dal medico di bordo (non sappiamo cosa ci facesse una culla a bordo di una nave da guerra e in effetti in altre versioni diventa una brandina o  un lettino)

LA VERSIONE DELLA FAMIGLIA COPPER

Paul Clayton, in “Whaling and sailing songs from the days of Moby Dick” 1954


I
It was often at Marais
Calling Benbow by his name
He fought on the raging main
You must know
Oh, the ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay
II
‘Twas Reuben (1) and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
‘Twas Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French,
Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight ye on, me English lads
‘Tis my lot, ’tis my lot
III
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried, Benbow cried
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried,
Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed
That the enemy I might face
‘Til I die, ’til I die
IV
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died, Benbow died
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church (2)
There he lay, there he lay
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Spesso si trovava a Marais
si chiamava Benbow di nome,
di come combattè in mare
dovete sapere.
Oh la nave rollava su e giù
e i colpi volavano
il nemico facevano a pezzi
là dove stavano, là dove stavano
II
C’erano la Ruby e Benbow
a combattere i francesi, combattere i francesi. C’erano Reuben e Benbow
a combattere i francesi
dal suo moncone cadde
e così forte gridò
” Continuate a combattere, inglesi
è la mia sorte, è la mia sorte”
III
Quando il dottore fasciò la ferita
Benbow gridò, Benbow gridò
quando il dottore fasciò la ferita
Benbow gridò
“Che un lettino sia subito
portato sul cassero
che i nemici combatterò
finchè non morirò, finchè non morirò.”
IV
Il mattino di martedì scorso
Benbow morì, Benbow morì,
il mattino di martedì scorso
Benbow morì
che orribile visione
quando Benbow fu portato via
fu portato alla chiesa di Kingston
là giace, là giace.

NOTE
1) la nave Ruby sostenne l’attacco  dell’ammiraglia Breda contro i vascelli francesi
2) fu sepolto nella Chiesa Parrocchiale di Kingston (Giamaica)

ADMIRAL BENBOW DI WILLIAM CHAPPELL

Intitolata “Benbow, the Brother Tar’s song” la ballata fu trascritta da William Chappel nel suo “Old English Popular Music”.
“La melodia è una variante di Love Will Find Out the Way, pubblicata per la prima volta nel 1651. Inizialmente circolava nei salotti alla moda, ma dopo il 1680 passò nelle canzoni della classe lavoratrice in paricolare dei contadini. Chappell la collezionò tra i raccoglitori di luppolo a metà del XIX secolo e Lucy Broadwood la trovò nel Sussex nel 1898.” (tratto da qui)
Il racconto della battaglia è molto impreciso
June Tabor & Martin Simpson in A cut above, 1982


I
We sailed from Virginia
and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our shipping
and then we weighed all.
Full in view on the seas, boys,
seven sails we did espy;
We mannéd our capstans
and weighed speedily.
II
Now the first we come up with was a brigantine sloop (1)
And we asked if the others was as big as they looked;
Ah, but turning to windward,
as near as we could lie (2)
We saw there were ten (3) men of war cruising by.
III
We drew up our squadron in very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time;
But the day being spent, boys, and the night a-coming on
We left them alone till the early next morn.
IV
Now the very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot;
And as he was wounded to his merry men he did say,
“Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away!”
V
Now the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly,
But brave Admiral Benbow for help would not cry;
“Take me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts,
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts.”
VI
Now, the very next morning by break of the day
They hoisted their topsails and so bore away;
We bore to Port Royal where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church (4).
VII
Come all you brave fellows, wherever you’ve been,
Let us drink to the health of our King and our Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance (5) of great Admiral Benbow.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Siamo salpati da Virginia
e poi da Fayall
dove abbiamo  imbarcato le provviste d’acqua poi siamo salpati.
In piena vista sui mari, ragazzi,
sette vele abbiamo adocchiato;
abbiamo levato l’ancora
e salpato rapidamente.
II
La prima nave che raggiungemmo era un brigantino
e abbiamo chiesto se gli altri erano grandi come sembravano;
Ah, ma virando al vento,
più vicino che si poteva
abbiamo visto che c’erano dieci navi da guerra che s’avvicinavano
III
Abbiamo schieratola nostra batteria in una linea molto precisa
e arditamente li abbiamo combattuti per ben quattro ore;
ma la giornata era trascorsa, ragazzi, e la notte stava arrivando
li abbiamo lasciati soli fino al mattino seguente.
IV
La mattina dopo, la battaglia si è dimostrato rovente
e il coraggioso Admiral Benbow ha ricevuto un colpo di cannone;
e mentre era ferito ai suoi uomini, ha detto,
“Prendetemi tra le vostre braccia, ragazzi, e portami via!”
V
Ora i cannoni hanno tuonato e le pallottole fischiato,
ma il coraggioso ammiraglio Benbow  non avrebbe pianto per chiedere aiuto;
“Portami giù nella cabina, per dare sollievo ai miei dolori
se i miei uomini mi vedessero, si spezzerebbero i loro cuori. ”
VI
Ora, il giorno dopo, al sorgere
del sole
loro [le navi francesi] issarono le vele e così si allontanarono;
noi ci portammo a Port Royal, dove la gente si affollava
per  vedere l’Ammiraglio Benbow portato a Kingston Church.
VII
Vieni tutti bravi compagni, ovunque voi siate
Beviamo alla salute del nostro re e della nostra regina,
un altro brindisi alla salute delle ragazze che conosciamo,
e il terzo in ricordo del grande ammiraglio Benbow.

NOTE
1) Il termine è di origine italiana (derivato da brigante, nella sua espressione originaria di componente una brigata, cioè gruppo di più persone da cui il termine). Infatti nel Quattrocento e nel Cinquecento il brigantino a vele latine era utilizzato frequentemente come unità per la guerra di corsa e la pirateria. Il brigantino era impiegato principalmente come cargo o nave di scorta; ebbe grande diffusione nel Mar Mediterraneo e nell’Europa del nord. (da wikipedia)
Le navi da guerra francesi al comando dell’ammiraglio Du Casse stavano scortando un convoglio di trasporto truppe. la nave ammiraglia Breda catturò la galera Anne , originariamente una nave inglese catturata dai francesi
2) è l’andatura di bolina quando la nave “stringe il vento”
3) le navi da guerra francesi erano in realtà solo 5 (come scorta alle navi da carico)
4) Benbow fu sepolto nella Chiesa Parrocchiale di Kingston (Giamaica)
5) in suo onore Robert Louis Stevenson nel suo libro “L’isola del Tesoro” inserisce una “Admiral Benbow Innall’inizio della storia

FONTI
https://www.historytoday.com/sam-willis/dark-side-admiral-benbow
http://bravebenbow.com/
http://bravebenbow.com/?page_id=136
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=137
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2169
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=109642
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56280
http://reelyredd.com/admiral-benbow-song.htm

https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/admiralbenbow.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/admiralbenbow.html

CAPTAIN KIDD

v0_masterIl capitano William Kidd (1645-1701) fu impiccato a Londra il 24 maggio 1701 dopo essere stato processato con l’accusa di pirateria.

Il ritratto che lo raffigura con tanto di parrucca e cravatta (così viene chiamato questo nuovo capo dell’abbigliamento maschile, entrato nella moda nella seconda metà del 1650: ovvero una striscia in seta con alto bordo in pizzo annodata a fiocco o più semplicemente ravvolta a più giri) è quello di un fiero capitano della seconda metà del Seicento, non certo di un pirata (barbuto o baffuto, con sporchi capelli arruffati o treccine, orecchini e bandana  ) !!

L’Adventure, la nave di Kidd nella seconda parte della sua carriera

UN RISPETTABILE CORSARO

C’era una linea, sempre più sottile all’epoca, che divideva i rispettabili corsari dai pirati: i corsari avevano la licenza di depredare le navi “nemiche” sia che fossero francesi o spagnole o navi pirata ed erano in possesso della “lettera di corsa” con siglate le varie condizioni in merito alla “licenza”, avvallate anche dai rispettivi regnanti (perciò una parte del bottino spettava alla Corona); i pirati depredavano qualunque nave mercantile o pirata e il bottino era spartito tra l’equipaggio, di cui una bella fetta andava ovviamente al capitano.
William Kidd quella lettera ce l’aveva quando ritornò a fare il corsaro nel 1696 alla volta dell’Oceano Indiano, per meritarsi la fama di “Terrore di tutti i Mari”, poi le sua gesta in odore di pirateria o più semplicemente il mutare del vento (gli interessi mercantili della sempre più potente Compagnia delle Indie) lo fecero cadere in disgrazia.
Alcuni storici parlano di congiura contro il capitano Kidd manovrato dalle alte sfere come capro espiatorio; come sia la sua impiccagione diede il via a una notevole mole di cronache, atti processuali e ballate e lo fece diventare un personaggio famoso, ripreso nella letteratura e nel cinema.

Il personaggio mi ha riportato alla mente la storia del pirata Long John Silver (La vera storia del pirata Long John Silver di Larsson Björn -1995), -che consiglio caldamente di leggere -non per assonanza di vicissitudini quanto, io credo, di filosofia così riassunta “Se c’è qualcosa che dà un senso alla vita, è senz’altro il fatto di non essere soggetto ad alcuna legge, di non avere mani e piedi legati. E non importa il tipo di fune o chi ha stretto il nodo. È la corda stessa il male. È con quella che prima o poi si finisce per legarsi da soli o per essere appesi a una forca. Questa è stata la mia filosofia, e giustamente sono ancora vivo”

PRIMA VERSIONE DELLA BALLATA, 1701

936La prima broadside ballad venne distribuita tra la folla andata ad assistere all’impiccagione: “Captain Kid’s Farewel to the Seas, or the Famous Pirate’s Lament” sulla melodia “Coming Down” conteneva una ventina di strofe in cui il capitano confessava i suoi crimini (le navi depredate, l’uccisione di William Moore, il ricco bottino accumulato) e concludeva con rassegnazione davanti alla morte, dando l’addio al mare.

La “confessione” in realtà non fu mai pronunciata da capitan Kidd che anzi si proclamò sempre innocente! Si tratta chiaramente di una “Good-night Ballads”  un genere di moda nel 1700, con cui il condannato a morte si accomiata dalla folla andata ad assistere all’esecuzione. Alcune di queste canzoni sono state commissionate dagli stessi prigionieri, eppure non bisogna dare troppo credito documentario alle storie narrate, in quanto l’autore anonimo del broadside ci ricamava parecchio sopra.
Gallows songs, printed for sale at public executions, were a popular form of broadside until public hanging was abolished in the mid nineteenth century. These events attracted great crowds […] and provided an eager market for broadside sellers. […]. There must have been hundreds, perhaps thousands, of gallows songs telling the stories of murderers, pirates, traitors and other felons. They fulfilled a similar role to that of today’s more sensational Sunday newspapers, and when more popular newspapers came on the market from the mid nineteenth century, gallows songs faded away, though many went on being sung in oral tradition. Some were noted by the early collectors, who tended to reject them as ‘vulgar’. (Pollard, Folksong 32) (tratto da qui)

La canzone rimbalzò nelle Colonie inglesi d’America in cui circolò in forma di ballata dal 1730 al 1820 (e curiosamente il nome del capitano divenne Robert) e si arricchì di altre strofe e vari rimaneggiamenti.

LE MELODIE

Nell’esaustiva e dettagliata dissertazione di David Kidd (vedi) possiamo seguire tutta la storia della melodia rintracciata in terra scozzese e nella seconda metà del 1500 (Complaynt of Scotland 1549) diventata “My luve’s in Germanie” (una canzone sulla guerra del 1630-1648) di cui si ritrova la stampa con il titolo “Germanie Thomas“, in data 1794 (ascolta) tuttavia non tutti gli storici sono disposti a vedere questa diretta discendenza, pur riconoscendo una sorta di “motivo musicale” comune nelle Lowlands scozzesi sul tema amoroso. Un’altra radice celtica è stata rintracciata nella canzone gallese Mentra Gwen (in inglese Plaint of the Widow).

Veniamo quindi alla melodia indicata nel foglio della ballata stampato nel 1701, detta “Coming Down“: come si sa, nei fogli di strada erano riportati solo i testi (per lo più anonimi) e per la melodia si faceva riferimento ad arie popolari e in voga; proprio l’anno prima era stato giustiziato un tale di nome Jack Hall la cui ballata conosciuta da tutti terminava con “but never a word I said coming down” diventata poi Sam Hall nel 1849, la straziante storia dello spazzacamino di Londra impiccato per l’accusa di furto aggravato. Incidentalmente la melodia è simile alla ballata Admiral Benbow Air scritta nel 1702, mentre lo spartito è pubblicato nel 1783 in The Vocal Enchantress. Dalla stessa melodia popolare discende anche il brano “Ye Jacobites by name” scritto da Robert Burns nel 1792.

In America sulla melodia così orecchiabile si sono composti molti inni religiosi che hanno generato a loro volta una serie infinita di varianti e aggiustamenti

IL FOLK REVIVAL

Le versioni moderne del brano derivano per lo più dall’arrangiamento fatto da Pete Seeger (in “Golden Ring”, 1964) sulla versione che aveva imparato da Steve Benbow a sua volta influenzato da Admiral Benbow.
ASCOLTA Carl Peterson in I Love Scottish and Irish Sea Songs 2003. Qui la melodia è proprio un lamento e il testo è più simile alla ballata nella sua prima edizione (le immagini abbinate nel video sono disegni a carboncino, schizzi a matita o a china, litografie con navi, barche e marinai di varie epoche)


I
My name is Captain Kidd,
as I sailed, as I sailed
My name is Captian Kidd, as I sailed
My name is Captian Kidd,
God’s laws I did forbid
And most wickedly I did,
as I sailed, as I sailed
II
I was born in Greenock(1) town
as I sailed, as I sailed ..
from where the great ship
they did abound and they sailed the whole world round
III
Oh, my parents taught me well,
to shun the gates of Hell
But against them I rebelled
IV
Well, I murdered William Moore(2),
and I left him in his gore
Forty leagues from shore,
V
To execution dock(3)
I must go,
lay my head upon the block
And no more the laws I’ll mock
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
I
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e ho navigato
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare.
II
Sono nato a Greenock(1)
e ho navigato
da dove il grande veliero
è salpato
e si navigava in tutto il mondo
III
I miei genitori mi hanno ben insegnato
ad evitare i cancelli dell’Inferno,
ma contro di loro mi ribellai
IV
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
20 leghe lontano dalla riva
V
Al molo degli impiccati(3)
devo andare
metto la testa nel cappio,
non mi farò più beffe delle leggi

NOTE
1) William Kidd nacque intorno al 1645 a Greenock, porto scozzese nei pressi del fiordo di Clyde, figlio di un ministro presbiteriano a 14 anni scappò di casa per imbarcarsi e finalmente a 44 anni divenne capitano di una nave corsara che veleggiava nel mare dei Caraibi; due anni dopo si sistemò a New York (porto preferito da tanti pirati dell’epoca) con una ricca vedova in una bella casa di Coney Island. Però la vita da sposato (ancorchè trafficante) gli andava stretta e nel 1695 salpò per Londra a cercare dei finanziatori per riprendere i mari come corsaro.
2) l’uccisione immotivata di William Moore si unì all’accusa di pirateria, nonostante si trattasse di reazione ad un tentativo di ammutinamento della ciurma (pare che il capitano lo avesse colpito con un secchio sulla testa)
3) Kidd arrestato in America nel 1699 venne processato in Inghilterra e impiccato a Londra sul molo del Tamigi vicino a Wapping, famigerato per essere diventato “Il molo dell’esecuzione” (Galgendock). La pena capitale era riservata agli atti di ammutinamento e gli omicidi in alto mare per cui qui venivano impiccati ammutinati, contrabbandieri e pirati. La corda era tenuta corta, in modo che al condannato la morte sopraggiungesse lentamente per soffocamento (con la corda lasciata più lunga, la brusca caduta del corpo all’apertura della botola sottostante causava più facilmente  la rottura del collo). Pare che la corda di Kidd si ruppe al primo tentativo, e così pure al secondo, ma non sopraggiunse la grazia. Il suo corpo venne lasciato appeso in una gabbia di ferro a imputridire per tre anni, come avvertimento agli altri pirati.

La melodia è identica a Sam Hall, qui le versioni sono  più allegre e fanno assumere al testo una venatura ironica.
ASCOLTA Great Big Sea


Chorus:
My name is Captain Kidd
As I sailed, as I sailed
Oh, my name is Captain Kidd, as I sailed
My name is Captain Kidd
And God’s laws I did forbid
And most wickedly, I did
as I sailed
I
My father taught me well(1)
To shun the gates of hell
But against him I rebelled
as I sailed,
He stuck a bible in my hand
But I left it in the sand
And I pulled away from land
II
I murdered William Moore(2)
And I left him in his gore
Twenty leagues away from shore
And even crueler still,
his gunner I did kill
And his precious blood did spill
III
I was sick and nigh to death
And I vowed at every breath
To walk in wisdom’s path
But my repentance lasted not
For vows I had forgot
Oh damnation is my lot
IV
To the execution dock(3)
Lay my head upon the block
No more laws I will mock,
Take warning here and heed
To shun bad company
Or you’ll wind up just like me
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e ho navigato
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare.
I
Mio padre mi ha ben insegnato(1)
ad evitare i cancelli dell’Inferno,
ma contro di lui mi ribellai;
e ho navigato 
lui mise la bibbia nella mano,
ma la abbandonai sulla sabbia
e mi allontanai dalla terra
II
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
20 leghe lontano dalla riva
e ancor più crudelmente
il suo cannoniere ho ucciso
e il suo sangue prezioso ho versato
III
Ero malato e prossimo alla morte
e dedicai ogni respiro
a camminare sulla retta via
ma il mio pentimento non è durato
e quei voti ho dimenticato
oh la dannazione è il mio destino
V
Al molo dell’impiccato (3)
metto la testa nel cappio,
non mi farò più beffe delle leggi,
prestate attenzione qui e ascoltate:
evitate le cattive compagnie o
finirete proprio come me

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty della ballata, anche se Stan Hugill non la riporta nella sua “Bibbia

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed 4 Black Flag

I
O, my name was Captain Kidd,
as I sailed, as I sailed,
O, my name was Captain Kidd,
as I sailed.
My name was Captain Kidd
And God’s laws I did forbid,
And so wickedly I did
as I sailed, as I sailed.
So wickedly I did
as I sailed.
II
I murdered William Moore(2),
I laid him in his gore,
Not many leagues from the shore,
O, I murdered William Moore,
as I sailed, as I sailed.
III
I spied three ships from Spain
and I fired on them a-main,
And most of them I slain,
as I sailed, as I sailed.
IV
Come all you young and old,
see me die, see me die.
Come all you young and old,
see me die.
You are welcome to my goal,
And by it I lost my soul
Come all you young and old,
I must die, I must die.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
quando navigavo, quando navigavo
oh Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
quando navigavo
oh Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare
così crudelmente
quando navigavo
II
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
a non molte leghe dalla spiaggia
oh ho assassinato William Moore
quando andavo per mare
III
Ho spiato tre navi dalla Spagna
e ho sparato su di loro in mare
e molti ne ho ucciso
quando andavo per mare
IV
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
a vedermi morire, a vedermi morire
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
a vedermi morire,
Siete i benvenuti al mio trionfo
e a causa sua ho perso la mia anima
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
devo morire, devo morire

Interessante anche questa versione folk-rock dei Tempest che hanno riscritto il testo in difesa del corsaro Kidd ASCOLTA

IL TESORO SEPOLTO

Capitan Kidd illustrato da ANGUS McBRIDE

Il leggendario tesoro di Capitan Kidd è ancora sepolto da qualche parte a Long Island (oppure in un’isola sperduta nei Caraibi). Pare che il casus belli fosse l’ultima nave depredata, il mercantile Quedagh Merchant con oro, argento, pietre preziose e stoffe pregiate, per un valore di quattrocentomila sterline equivalenti a circa sessanta milioni di sterline odierne – poco meno di 67 milioni di euro. Purtroppo la maggior parte del carico apparteneva alla Compagnia Britannica delle Indie Orientali che pretese la testa del Capitano!
Recentemente un noto cacciatori di tesori, Barry Clifford, ha rivendicato la scoperta del relitto della nave di Kidd, l’Adventure Galley.
Il mitico tesoro ha ispirato Robert Louis Stevenson nella stesura dell'”Isola del Tesoro”..

FONTI
http://www.bluebird-electric.net/academia/Marine_Archaeology_Treasure_Ships/Captain_William_Kidd_Pirates_Adventure_Galley_Privateer_Ship.htm
http://www.instoria.it/home/capitano_kidd.htm
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LK35.html
http://www.davidkidd.net/Captain_Kidd_Lyrics.html
http://www.davidkidd.net/Captain_Kidd_Music.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=70693
http://people.brandeis.edu/~dkew/David/Bonner-CaptKidd_ballad-1944.pdf