Archivi categoria: Musica scozzese/ Scottish music

Wee Willie Gray

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Testo: Robert Burns
Melodia: Wee Totum Fogg.
1795

 

Il Duca di Leeds da bambino ritratto di Hans Hausing, 1726

Robert Burns riporta per lo “Scots Musical Museum” un frammento di una canzoncina popolare (rielabarota da lui basandosi su pochi versi) dal titolo “Wee Willie Gray”. Una canzoncina per bambini in cui il piccolo Willy si veste con la corteccia del salice, i petali delle rose e dei gigli. Il piccolo Willy Gray è forse un folletto o un personaggio un po’ tonto dei racconti popolari,  anche se non si esclude che Robbie abbia voluto alludere ironicamente a qualche persona di sua conoscenza.
Ci immaginiamo il piccolo Willy che indossa il costume delle Highlands, con un tessuto in tartan a base rosso, e il caratteristico berretto, lo Scottish Bonnet che a partire dal 1700 viene abbellito da una coccarda, l’emblema del clan e una piuma.
Il completino è abbinato all’immancabile mantello in tartan (plaid)
In sintonia con il buffo personaggio anche la melodia (che alcuni studiosi ritengono composta da Robert Burns) è una saltellante hornpipe del Border.

Tony Cuffe & Rod Paterson in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 1 (Linn Records)


I
WEE Willie Gray,
an’ his leather wallet (1);
Peel a willie (2) wand,
to be him boots and jacket.
The rose upon the breer
will be him trouse an’ doublet,
The rose upon the breer
will be him trouse an’ doublet.
II
Wee Willie Gray,
and his leather wallet;
Twice a lily-flower
will be him sark and cravat (3);
Feathers of a flee
wad feather up his bonnet (4),
Feathers of a flee
wad feather up his bonnet.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Piccolo Willy Gray
e la sua scarsella
scorteccia una bacchetta di salice
per farsi gli stivali e la marsina:
la rosa sullo spino
sarà le sue braghe e il farsetto
la rosa sullo spino
sarà le sue braghe e il farsetto.
II
Piccolo Willy Gray
e la sua scarsella
due volte il giglio
sarà la sua camicia e la cravatta
la ali di una mosca
saranno le piume del berretto
la ali di una mosca
saranno le piume del  berretto

NOTE
1) Nel settecento il portafoglio era una scarsella che si portava agganciata alla cintura e conteneva sia le banconote che del cibo. Era considerato uno status symbol, relativamente all’agiatezza di chi lo indossava. Il portafoglio piatto come lo conosciamo oggi nasce piuttosto nell’Ottocento
2) willie= willow. Nelle leggende una bacchetta di salice è la bacchetta magica degli stregoni, oltre all’assonanza con il nome Willy non posso fare a meno di  pensare alla figura della scottish country dance chiamata “streep the willow”



3) La cravatta nel 700 era una sciarpa di mussola (con bordi impreziositi da trine e ricami a seconda dell’occasione) girata una o più volte intorno al collo e annodata sul davanti con un fiocco o un nodo semplice. Per lo più bianca dopo la rivoluzione francese diventa sinonimo di controrivoluzionari.
4) è il blue bonnet la cui foggia  risale al 1500 e che ha dato il soprannome di ‘Bluebonnets’ agli Highlanders

FONTI
https://www.padandquill.com/blog/2017/03/09/wallet-origins-and-history/
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/615.htm
http://burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-vi,-song-514,-page-530-wee-willie-gray

Wee Willie Gray

Leggi in italiano
Lyrics: Robert Burns
Tune: Wee Totum Fogg.
1795

The Duke of Leeds as a child, in Highland costume, by Hans Hausing, 1726

Robert Burns reports for the “Scots Musical Museum” a fragment of a popular song (revived by him based on a few traditional verses) entitled “Wee Willie Gray”. A little children song in which little Willy dresses with the bark of the willow, the petals of roses and lilies. The little Willy Gray is perhaps an elf or a jerky character of lore, or pheraps Robbie wanted to allude ironically to some person of his knowledge.

We imagine the little Willy all dresses in the Highland costume, with a red-based tartan fabric, and the distinctive cap, the Scottish Bonnet that since 1700 is embellished with a rosette, the emblem of the clan and a feather. The look is outfitted with a tartan coat (plaid)
In tune with the funny character also the melody (which some scholars believe composed by Robert Burns) is jumping, double hornpipe from the Borders.

Tony Cuffe & Rod Paterson in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 1 (Linn Records)

I
WEE Willie Gray,
an’ his leather wallet (1);
Peel a willie (2) wand,
to be him boots and jacket.
The rose upon the breer
will be him trouse an’ doublet,
The rose upon the breer
will be him trouse an’ doublet.
II
Wee Willie Gray,
and his leather wallet;
Twice a lily-flower
will be him sark and cravat (3);
Feathers of a flee
wad feather up his bonnet (4),
Feathers of a flee
wad feather up his bonnet.

NOTES
for English translation
1) By the 1700s, wallets were still purse attached to the hip and carried everything from old notes to bits of food. It was considered a status symbol, relative to the comfort of the wearer. The flat portfolio as we know it today arises rather in the nineteenth century
2) willie= willow. In the legends a wand of willow is the magic wand, but it recalls the figure of the scottish country dance called “streep the willow”



3) The tie in the 700 was a muslin scarf (with borders embellished with lace and embroidery depending on the occasion) turned one or more times around the neck and knotted at the front with a bow or a simple knot. Mostly white after the French revolution, it became synonymous with counter-revolutionaries.
4) It is the blue bonnet whose style dates back to 1500s and which gave the nickname of ‘Bluebonnets’ to the Highlanders

LINK
https://www.padandquill.com/blog/2017/03/09/wallet-origins-and-history/
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/615.htm
http://burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-vi,-song-514,-page-530-wee-willie-gray

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

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The Gaelic name Srath Bhàthain translates to English as “the valley of the Blane”, with reference to the Blane Water is ‘The Braes of Strathblane’ ballad, also sung in Scottish Gaelic, may have originated in Stirlingshire; it is however widespread in the Hebrides and in Ireland like “The Banks of Strathdon”
‘The Braes of Strathblane’ is a song which is firmly based in the oral tradition. As a result it is difficult to pinpoint its origins and author. It is, however, one of many folksongs which feature the braes of a village and young love. This song, indeed, an identical match to the lyrics of ‘The Braes of Strathdon’, which lies in Aberdeenshire. On other broadsides the suggested to tune to these lyrics is often ‘As I stood at my cottage door’.see)

SCOTTISH GAELIC VERSION

lavandaiaWidespread in the Hebrides and sung in Scottish Gaelic ballad’s history is a bit unusual compared to the “courting songs”: a young washerwoman refuses the proposal of marriage of her suitor (apparently a idle lad and not liked by her parents) and he instead to wander desperately and disconsolate for some distant valley (as would happen in an Irish song) goes to woo some other more available girl. In the last verses the girl complains about having let slip the opportunity to get married (with the fear of being a spinster forever)!

Capercaillie in “Delirium”, 1991.

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

English translation *
I
Walking out early alone
on a morning in May
Among green fields,
an outcast and purposeless,
I saw a maiden
who lived some way above me
As she washed her clothes
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.
II
I then climbed upwards
to the maiden I loved was
And courteously and mildly
I spoke to her
“It’s over a year
since our love began,
And if you are willing
we shall marry at once.”
III
“Marry? To Marry
I’m too young
Your sort has tongue
that could cause trouble anywhere;
My father and mother
would scold me forever more
If I were to marry the likes of you,
you feckless young man.’
IV
But you young girls everywhere
who are still unmarried,
Don’t go turning young men down through pride or contempt.
How sad for me
to be unmarried forever more-
I’ll have to live alone,
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.

I
‘S mi ri imeachd nam aonar
Anns an òg-mhadain Mhàigh
Feadh lèantaichean uaine
Mar fhear-fuadain gun stàth
Nuair a chunnaic mi a’ ghruagach
An taobh shuas dhiom a’ tàmh
‘S i ri nigh’a cuid aodaich
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin
II
An sin dhìrich mi suas
Far ‘n robh gruagach mo ghràidh
Is labhair mi rithe
Gu sìobhalta tlàth
“Tha bliadhn’agus còrr
Bhon a thòisich an gràdh
Is ma bhitheas tu deònach
Nì sinn pòsadh gun dàil”
III
“Gu pòsadh, gu pòsadh
Ro òg tha mi ‘n dràsd’
Gu bheil teang’aig do sheòrsa
Dhèanadh fògradh ‘s gach àit
Gum biodh m’athair ‘s mo mhàthair
Gam chàineadh gu bràth
Nam pòsainn do leithid
O fhleasgaich gun stàth”
IV
Ach a nìonagan òga
Tha gun phòsadh ‘s gach àit’
Na diùltaibh fir òga
Le mòrchuis no tàir
Nach muladach dhòmhsa
Bhith gun phòsadh gu bràth
‘S fheudar fuireach nam aonar
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin

NOTES
(1) The Blane Water has also been referred to as Beul-abhainn  meaning “mouth-river” after the numerous burns merging.One of its tributaries, the Ballagan Burn passes over the waterfall the Spout of Ballagan which shows 192 alternate strata of coloured shales and limestone (including pure alabaster) (from Wiki)

Gary Ellis “Balloch”

SCOTTISH AND IRISH VERSIONS

LINK
http://glasgowpictures.blogspot.it/2010/02/high-ballagan-waterfall.html
https://www.visitscotland.com/info/towns-villages/strathblane-p240461
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/20794
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/aodann.htm

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

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FROM  OUTLANDER SAGA

Diana Gabaldon

“Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.”
(From DRAGONFLY IN AMBER, Chapter 34, “The Postman Always Rings Twice”. Copyright© 1992 by Diana Gabaldon.)
The Scottish women have developed a particular technique for the twisting of the tweed, that woolen fabric from Scotland, warm, resistant and almost indestructible, used by fishermen and shepherds to keep warmer in a climate so cold and windy.
Cloth were “mistreated” by a group of women sitting around a table with 4 beat: first, the fabric is banged on the table in front of you, then slammed towards the center of the table, then returned to the initial position and then is passed to the next woman (clockwise). To count the time and make the work less monotonous the women sang some songs, there was the ban dhuan (or the song-woman) that directed the song, while the others followed her in the refrain. After some songs the fabric was softer, thicker, and more tightly woven.

OUTLANDER TV, season I: “Rent”

In Outlander TV serie this glimpse of life in a scottish village of eighteenth-century, is developed in the Dougal Mackenzie’s journey, as he collects rents from the tenants of Castel Leoch. Claire goes on the road with Dougal, and almost by chance, she hears some voices and sees the women as they are waulking the tweeds.

Outlander I, episode 5: Mo Nighean Donn

English transaltion*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr (1)
[Sèist:]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark
thee
At the fair of the young women.
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
And we will walk hand in hand
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
Regardless of any living elders (2).

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

NOTES
1)  The Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland
2) Similar expressions are recurrent in popular songs when a young couple “swimmed against the tide” about courtship and don’t followed the tradition.  (celtic wedding)

Clair takes part in the fulling of the tweed and sings with the village women. The ban dhuan is Fiona Mackenzie

Two are the Wool Waulking Songs  in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” and “Mo Nighean Donn” (a tribute to Claire’s brown hair)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originally from the island of Barra “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” (One day as I roamed the hills) is about a man roaming around the Highlands, who comes across a beautiful young girl gathering herbs; these accidental encounters on the moors (between the heather and the broom in bloom) are the subject of many traditional Scottish songs from ancient origins, and often man is not limited to the request for a kiss! The girl rejects him because she considers him a vagabond. As usual in the choice of musical tracks, the lyrics always have an affinity with the story told in the saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho

English translation*
One day as I was traveling a hill
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)


(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”


Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh!
A bhodachain ròmaich


(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

NOTES
1) or “Hoots toots!”
2) or ” you shaggy old man!”, a shaggy peasant

Mo Nighean Donn

“Mo Nighean Donn” (My brown-haired lass) does not have a real meaning, it seems more than the ban dhuan to report the gossip of the moment.  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
(a Celtic song with instrumental parts and male voice)

English translation*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
[choir]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
(I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.)

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

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DALLA SAGA OUTLANDER

Diana Gabaldon

Nel libro “”Il ritorno” (capitolo 11) della saga Outlander scritta da Diana Gabaldon Claire è invitata dalle donne di Lallybroch a prendere un tè e assiste alla follatura del tweed che si svolge in un apposito capanno “riservato” alle donne della tenuta
““Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.” continua
Le donne scozzesi hanno elaborato una tecnica particolare per la follatura del tweed, quel tessuto di lana originario dalla Scozia, caldo, resistente e pressoché indistruttibile, utilizzato dai pescatori e pastori per tenersi più al caldo in un clima così freddo e ventoso.
Per infeltrire la lana ma in modo uniforme e migliorane le prestazioni  le pezze di stoffa venivano “maltrattate” da un gruppo di donne sedute introno ad un tavolo (precedentemente immerse in grandi tinozze piene di urina); il movimento della battitura consisteva in 4 tempi: prima si sbatteva il tessuto sul tavolo davanti a sé, poi si sbatteva verso il centro del tavolo, quindi si riportava alla posizione iniziale e infine lo si passava alla donna successiva (in senso orario). Per contare il tempo e rendere meno monotono il lavoro le donne cantavano delle canzoni, c’era la  ban dhuan (ovvero la donna-canzone) che dirigeva il canto, mentre le altre la seguivano nel ritornello. Dopo qualche canzone il tessuto diventava più morbido, ma anche più compatto e resistente.

OUTLANDER TV, stagione I: “Riscossione”

Nella serie televisiva questo scorcio di vita nei villaggi della Scozia settecentesca è sviluppato nel giro di Dougal  Mackenzie di Castel Leoch presso gli affittuari per la riscossione dei tributi. Quasi per caso Clarie sentento delle voci, si avvicina alle donne mentre infeltriscono il tweed.

Outlander I episodio 5: Mo Nighean Donn

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark thee
At the fair of the young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta.
O mia brunetta, ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli (2)

NOTE
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna  (matrimonio celtico)

 

Clair partecipa alla follatura del tweed e canta insieme alle donne del villaggio. La ban dhuan è Fiona Mackenzie

Le Wool Waulking Songs sono due in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
la prima più veloce “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh“, la seconda vista nel video “Mo Nighean Donn” (un omaggio ai capelli castani di Claire)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originaria dell’isola di Barra,  la canzone parla di un uomo in giro per le Highland che s’imbatte in una bella fanciulla intenta a raccogliere delle erbe, questi incontri fortuiti nelle brughiere (tra l’erica e la ginestra in fiore) sono il soggetto di molti canti tradizionali della Scozia dalle origini antiche e spesso l’uomo non si limita alla richiesta di un bacetto! La fanciulla lo respinge perchè lo reputa un vagabondo. Come consuetudine nella scelta delle tracce musicali i testi hanno sempre un’attinenza con la storia narrata nella saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho
Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh! (1)
A bhodachain ròmaich
(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

Traduzione inglese*
One day as I was traveling a mountain
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)
(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men (3)
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Un giorno che ero in viaggio per i monti
un giorno che ero in viaggio per la brughiera incontrani una ragazza
dalle belle trecce
con un piccolo pugnale tra le mani
stava tagliando delle margherite
e raccoglieva il crescione.
Mi sono avvicinato
e le ho chiesto un bacio.
“Smamma bello
Vattene zoticone!
(Nella mia dimora di famiglia
si trovano nobili genti
una ventina di uomini con il cappello
una dozzina di donne con il mantello
bianche tovaglie
stese sui tavoli
con tazze di percellana
e bicchieri pieni di birra.)”

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) l’espressione tradotta anche come “Hoots toots!”  è un modo colloquiale per respingere una persona sgradita
2) anche tradotto come ” you shaggy old man!” letteralmente “piccolo vecchio peloso” vecchio ha un significato colloquiale che non necessariemnte indica una persione anziana, nel contesto la frase è un appellativo rivolto a un vagabondo malandato, dai capelli lunghi e la barba incolta, anche bifolco
3) indossare il cappello è d’obbligo per un gentiluomo

Mo Nighean Donn

La canzone “Mo Nighean Donn” (la mia ragazza castana) non ha un vero e proprio significato, sembra più altro che la ban dhuan  riferisca i gossip del momento. La versione in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  è più lunga rispetto alla versione nelle riprese
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
Negli anni 40-50 con il tramonto della lavorazione artigianale (in particolare dell’Harris Tweed) queste canzoni di lavoro sono diventate occasione di session dimostrative o sono passate nei repertori di alcuni gruppi di musica celtica con l’inserimento di parti strumentali e voci maschili.

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by the forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta hò gù
In questo momento sono al lago vicino alla foresta
e Effie non mi sta canzonando.
La milizia è stata ripristinata
e questo porterà via i giovani da noi.
Staranno fuori per un mese
questo  non mancherà di lasciarci pieni di tristezza.
O mia moretta , ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
La mia ragazza bruna ha vinto una scommessa
dove erano accampati i guerrieri
Sono stanco di gettare le reti
nelle parti basse di ogni baia.
Io andrò oltre la collina
dove ci sono le belle donne
giovani.
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli(2)
E la mia mano ti terrà stretta
anche se preferirei abbracciarti
E se riuscirò a raggiungerti (3)
ti metterò una corona tra le mani.
Avrai quella e ancor meglio
un bravo marinaio, giovane e forte

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna .
3) il ragazzo è partito per mare in cerca di un buon guadagno, al suo ritorno le chiederà di sposarlo

 

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Nighean Dubh, Nighean Donn

Leggi in italiano

“Nighean Dubh, Nighean Donn” (“Black-haired Girl, Brown -haired Girl”) is a waulking song in which a sailor in love with a beautiful girl with black hair, hopes that she will not be courted by anyone else, because he wants to marry her as soon as he returns from the sea.
Although the verses in these working songs are mostly extemporaneous, the textual version examined lends itself to two interpretations: they met each other while they went to work as agricultural workers, and the boy to make some money, takes the sea and then he is desperate because he fears that his beauty in the meantime will marry another. In the second interpretation (which does not exclude the first) the sailor promises (if the girl will wait for him) to leave the sea and go back to being a farmer to stay close to her.

Mary Jane Lamond in “Orain Ghaidhlig” (Gaelic Songs of Cape Breton) 2000 
Capercaille in  “At The Heart Of It All” 2013 
(but the verses are different from those sung by Mary Jane Lamond)

English translationTom Thomson
Hò ra hù o
black-haired girl,
brown-haired girl…
Hì rì ri ò
beautiful brown-haired girl…
Hò ra hù o black-haired girl,
brown-haired girl..
Brown-haired girl with the very white bosom…
After you I am so sorrowful…
Brown-haired girl with the fair bosom…
I will meet you on Sunday…
I will meet you in the autumn…
the time when the barn is being filled .(1)…
I will meet you in the evening…
Though the rest will talk about us…
In the morning the horn was blown…
waking us up in Seònad’s house…
Here I am, going to Greenock (2)…
And struggling with the rigging…
You talking with the maiden…
Me sailing over the sea…
You talking with the girl…
who gave her heart’s love to me…
But if you wait until Mayday (3)…
No living Campbell will get you…
No Campbell under the sun will get you…
nor will any MacLean…
No more will a MacLean get you…
indeed I myself will wed you…
Mary Jane Lamond lyrics
Hò ra hù a nighean dubh, nighean donn…
Hì rì ri ò nighean donn bhòidheach…
Hò ra hù a nighean dubh, nighean donn..
Nighean donn a’bhroillich glé-ghil…
As do dhéidh tha mise brònach…
Nighean donn a’ bhroillich shoilleir…
Dheannain coinneamh riut Di-Dòmhnaich…
Dheannain coinneamh riut ‘s an t-fhoghar…
Ám an t-sabhail a bhi ‘ga bhòrdadh…
Dheannain coinneamh riut ‘s an anmoch…
Ged ‘bhiodh càch a seanachas oirnn…
Anns a’ mhadainn shéid an dùdach…
Bha’gar dùsgadh an taigh Seònaid…
Mise seo a’ dol a Ghriannaig…
‘S mi gam riasladh aig na ròpan…
Thusa bruidhinn ris a’ gruagaich…
Mis’ air bhàrr a’ chuain a’ seòladh…
Thusa bruidhinn ris an nighean…
A thug gaol a cridhe dhomhsa…
Ach ma dh’fhanas tu gu Bealltainn…
Chan fhaigh Caimbeulach tha beò thu…
Chan fhaigh Caimbeulach fon ghréin thu…
Chan fhaigh Mac ‘Illean nas mòth’, thu…
Chan fhaigh Mac ‘Illean nas mòth’, thu…
‘S ann a ní mi fhín do phòsadh…

NOTES
1) it describes the activity of the seasonal laborer who was going to harvest for the big farmers. See The Band o’ shearers
2) In the eighteenth century Greenock became the main port on the west coast of Scotland and prospered through trade with the Americas, importing sugar from the Caribbean.
3) the Celtic festival of the May

OUTLANDER LESSON

How to pronounce Mo nighean donn?

LINKS
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/lamond/nighean.htm
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Scottish/Orain_Luaidh/NigheanDubhNigheanDonn.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/2032/4

Nighean Dubh, Nighean Donn

Read the post in English

“Nighean Dubh, Nighean Donn” (in inglese “Black-haired Girl, Brown -haired Girl”) è una waulking song in cui un marinaio innamorato di una bella ragazza dai capelli neri, spasima per lei, e spera che non si faccia corteggiare da nessun altro, perchè la vuole sposare non appena sarà di ritorno dal mare.
Anche se le strofe in questi canti di lavoro  (la tecnica d’infeltrimento del tweed scozzese) sono per lo più  estemporanee, la versione testuale esaminata si presta a due interpretazioni: i due si sono conosciuti mentre andavano a lavorare come braccianti agricoli e il ragazzo per fare un po’ di soldi prende il mare e poi si dispera perchè teme che la sua bella nel frattempo si sposi con un altro. Nella seconda interpretazione (che non esclude la prima) il marinaio si ripromette (se la ragazza lo aspetterà) di  lasciare il mare  e ritornare a fare il contadino per poter starle sempre vicino.

Mary Jane Lamond in “Orain Ghaidhlig” (Gaelic Songs of Cape Breton) 2000 
Capercaille in  “At The Heart Of It All” 2013 
(ma le strofe sono diverse da quelle cantate da Mary Jane Lamond la waulkin song “Nighean Dubh, Nighean Donn” è seguita nella traccia da un’altro canto che al momento non ho ancora identificato)

Versione Mary Jane Lamond in gaelico scozzese
Hò ra hù a nighean dubh, nighean donn…
Hì rì ri ò nighean donn bhòidheach…
Hò ra hù a nighean dubh, nighean donn..
Nighean donn a’bhroillich glé-ghil…
As do dhéidh tha mise brònach…

Nighean donn a’ bhroillich shoilleir…
Dheannain coinneamh riut Di-Dòmhnaich…

Dheannain coinneamh riut ‘s an t-fhoghar…
Ám an t-sabhail a bhi ‘ga bhòrdadh…

Dheannain coinneamh riut ‘s an anmoch…
Ged ‘bhiodh càch a seanachas oirnn…

Anns a’ mhadainn shéid an dùdach…
Bha’gar dùsgadh an taigh Seònaid…

Mise seo a’ dol a Ghriannaig…
‘S mi gam riasladh aig na ròpan…

Thusa bruidhinn ris a’ gruagaich…
Mis’ air bhàrr a’ chuain a’ seòladh…

Thusa bruidhinn ris an nighean…
A thug gaol a cridhe dhomhsa…

Ach ma dh’fhanas tu gu Bealltainn…
Chan fhaigh Caimbeulach tha beò thu…

Chan fhaigh Caimbeulach fon ghréin thu…
Chan fhaigh Mac ‘Illean nas mòth’, thu…

Chan fhaigh Mac ‘Illean nas mòth’, thu…
‘S ann a ní mi fhín do phòsadh…

Traduzione inglese di Tom Thomson
Hò ra hù o
black-haired girl,
brown-haired girl…
Hì rì ri ò
beautiful brown-haired girl…
Hò ra hù o black-haired girl,
brown-haired girl..
Brown-haired girl with the very white bosom…
After you I am so sorrowful…
Brown-haired girl with the fair bosom…
I  would meet you on Sunday…
I would  meet you in the autumn…
the time when the barn is being filled…
I will meet you in the evening…
Though the rest will talk about us…
In the morning the horn was blown…
waking us up in Seònad’s house…
Here I am, going to Greenock…
And struggling with the rigging…
You talking with the maiden…
Me sailing over the sea…
You talking with the girl…
who gave her heart’s love to me…
But if you wait until Mayday…
No living Campbell will get you…
No Campbell under the sun will get you…
nor will any MacLean…
No more will a MacLean get you…
indeed I myself will wed you…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Hò ra hù o
ragazza mora
ragazza castana (1) …
Hì rì ri ò
mia bella brunetta..
Hò ra hù o moretta,
ragazza castana
Brunetta
dal candido petto
Mi tormento a causa tua.
Brunetta
dal bel seno
Ci incontreremo domenica.
Ci incontreremo in autunno
Quando ci sarà la fienagione (quando si riempiranno i fienili).(2)
Ci incontreremo la sera
Anche se gli altri sparleranno di noi.
Al mattino il suono del corno
ci sveglierà nella casa di Seònad.
Ed eccomi diretto a  Greenock (3)
alle prese con le manovre.
tu parli con la mia ragazza
e io navigo sul mare.
tu parli con la ragazza
che mi ha dato l’amore del suo cuore.
Ma se aspetti fino a Beltane (4)
Nessun Campbell che respira ti prenderà.
Nessun Campbell sotto il sole ti prenderà
E nemmeno un MacLean .
MacLean non ti prenderà più
infatti io stesso ti sposerò.

NOTE
1) letteralmente ragazza dai capelli neri, ragazza dai capelli castani, per noi sono sinonimi di moretta e brunetta. Il colore castano nei capelli definisce una vasta gamma di sfumature in italiano  il termine descrive la tipica colorazione della buccia di una castagna.
2)si descrive l’attività del bracciante stagionale che andava a mietere per le grandi fattotie. vedasi ad esempio The Band o’ shearers
3) Nel Settecento Greenock diventò il porto principale della costa occidentale della Scozia e prosperò grazie ai traffici con le Americhe, importando zucchero dai Caraibi.
4) la festa celtica del Maggio

OUTLANDER LESSON

Come si pronuncia Mo nighean donn? (mia bella mora.. letteralmente “la mia ragazza cai capelli neri”)

continua

WAULKING SONGS
i canti tradizionali delle donne scozzesi intente nella lavorazione del tweed: http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/worker-songs/waulking-the-tweed/

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/lamond/nighean.htm
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Scottish/Orain_Luaidh/NigheanDubhNigheanDonn.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/2032/4

Godred Cròvan’s Galley

Leggi in italiano

Godred Cròvan (in irish gaelic “Gofraid mac meic Arailt“) was a Norse-Gael ruler of Dublin, and King of Mann and the Isles in the second half of the 11th century.
Godred may well be identical to the celebrated King Orry of Manx legend, Godred and King Orry are associated with numerous historic and prehistoric sites on Mann and Islay.  As the ruler of Dublin and the Isles, Godred dominated the routes through the Irish Sea region.

MANX VERSION: Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan

In the XX century George Broderick, Douglas Fargher and Brian Stowell wrote the text in manx gaelic  from an Hebridean tune. It tells of the King Orry galley’s landing on the Isle of Man.
Cairistiona Dougherty & Paul Rogers live (or sound track here)
Scran

 Manx gaelic
O vans ny hovan O,
Hirree O sy hovan;
O vans ny hovan O,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Kiart ayns lhing ny Loghlynee
Haink nyn Ree gys Mannin
Tessyn mooiryn freayney roie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
II
Datt ny tonnyn, heid yn gheay
Ghow yn skimmee aggle;
Agh va fer as daanys ayn,
Hie yn Ree dy stiurey.
III
Daag ad Eeley er nyn gooyl
Shiaull’ my yiass gy Mannin;
Eeanlee marrey, raunyn roie,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
IV
Hrog ad seose yn shiaull mooar mean,
Hum ny maidjyn tappee –
Gour e vullee er y cheayn,
Cosney’n Kione ny hAarey.
V
Stiagh gy Balley Rhumsaa hie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan;
Ooilley dooiney er y traie
Haink dy oltagh’ Gorree.
VI
Jeeagh er Raad Mooar Ghorree heose
Cryss smoo gial ‘sy tuinney,
Cowrey da ny Manninee
Reiltys Ghorree Chrovan.
English translation*
O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Right in the era of the Norsemen,
Their king came to Mannin,
Running across surging seas,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
II
The waves swoll up and the wind blew,
The crew were frightened,
But there was one brave man,
The King went to steer.
III
They left Islay behind them,
Sailing southward to Mannin,
Sea birds and seals running,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
IV
They raised the main-sail,
The oars dipped quickly,
Onwards on the sea,
Reaching the Point of Ayre.
V
Into Ramsey went,
Gorree Crovan’s longship,
Every man on the beach,
Come to salute Gorree.
VI (1)
Look at the Milkey-Way above,
Brightest band in the heavens,
A sign to the Manx,
Of the Gorree Crovan’s government.

1) Ramsey is a coastal town in the north of the Isle of Man: landing point of the Viking warrior Godred Crovan around 1079, came to subjugate the island and make it his kingdom. The fact told is obviously after the conquest because the first time the islanders tried to defend themselves from the Vikings, and near the landing of the galley there was a violent battle and not a festive crowd !!

SCOTTISH VERSION: Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain

And here is the Hebridean tune, the song composed by the bard and songwriter Duncan Johnston of Islay (Donnchadh MacIain 1881-1947) and published in his book “Cronan nan Tonn” (The Croon of the Sea) in 1938! The journey, however, is told to the contrary, the Viking galley leaves the Isle of Man to go to Islay.
Scottish gaelic lyrics

English lyrics
The Corries
The Barge O’ Gorrie Crovan, a more warlike version

The Sound of Mull, a trio from Tobermory, Isle of Mull : Janet Tandy, Joanie MacKenzie and David Williamson. (verses I, II, IV)
Robin Hall & Jimmy Macgregor  (verses I, IV)

Scottish gaelic
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
Air Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain (1)
I
Fichead sonn air cùl nan ràmh,
Fichead buille lùghmhor,
Siùbhlaidh ì mar eun a’ snàmh,
Is sìoban thonn ‘ga sgiùrsadh.
II
Suas i sheòid air bàrr nan tonn !
Sìos gu ìochdar sùigh i !
Suas an ceòl is togaibh fonn,
Tha Mac an Righ ‘ga stiuireadh !
III
A’bhìrlinn rìoghail ‘s i a th’ann
Siubhal-sìth ‘na gluasad
Sròl is sìoda àrd ri crann
‘S i bratach Olaibh Ruaidhe (2)
IV
Dh’ fhàg sinn Manainn (3) mòr nan tòrr,
Eireann a’ tighinn dlùth dhuinn,
Air Ile-an-Fheòir tha sinn an tòir
Ged dh’ èireas tonnan dùbh-ghorm
V
Siod e ‘nis-an t-eilean crom!(4)
Tìr nan sonn nach diùltadh,
Stòp na dìbhe ‘thoirt air lom
‘S bìdh fleadh air bonn ‘san Dùn (5) duinn!
English
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
The barge of Gorrie Crovan
I
Behind the oars, a score so brave,
A lusty score to row her,
She sails away like bird on wave,
While foaming seas lash o’er her.
II
Up she goes on ocean wave !
Down the surge she wails O,
Sing away; the chorus, raise,
A royal prince; he sails her !
III
The royal galley onward skims,
With magic speed, she sails O,
Aloft her silken bunting swims,
Red Olav‘s Banner waving.
IV
The towers of Man we leave away,
Old Erin’s hills we hail O,
On Islay’s shore her course we lay
Though billows roar and rave O.
V
See the island bent like bow,
Where kindly souls await us;
The Castle hall, I see it now,
The feast’s for us prepared O

NOTES
Gaelic and English texts by Duncan Johnston (Donnachadh Mac Iain), published in his book Cronan nan Tonn (The Croon of the Sea) 1938/9 and reprinted in 1997 by Dun Eisden of Inverness. These are his comments on the song:
1)  Godred, or Gorry Crovan was, according to the ancient sagas, the son of Harald the Black of Isla.  Tradition has it that his mother was a lady of the subdued House of Angus Beag, son of Erc, who occupied Isla in 498.  This explains his remarkable popularity with both the Norse and Celtic elements in the west.  His grand-daughter, Regnaldis (Raonaild), daughter of Olave the Red, afterwards married Somerled, who displaced Red Olave as King of the Isles.  Somerled founded the Dynasty of the Lords of the Isles, with its headquarters on an island on Loch Finlagan in Isla.  Godred was a celebrated warrior of the eleventh century.  He acted as Adjutant to the King of Norway at the battle of Stamford Bridge, 1066.  Escaping from that stricken field, he made his way to the Isle of Man, and thence to Isla, where he raised his standard.  The Norsemen and the Gaels alike flocked to his standard.  With a large force, he crossed over into the North of Ireland (Ulster), and carried everything before him up to the gates of Dublin, which City surrendered to him.  For a time, he waged a successful war against the King of Scotland.  In Isla he was spoken of with saintly reverence because of his prowess and dauntless gallantry in ridding the island of a huge saurian that had his lair near the present village of Bridgend.  Many of our Clans and their Septs of the west can claim descent from Godred.  The MacDougalls, MacDonalds, MacAllisters, MacRuaries, MacRanalds, MacIains, etc.  He died in Isla in 1095, and his grave is marked with a huge white boulder, known locally as “An Carragh Ban.”  He founded the Dynasty of the Kingdom of the Isles, of Dublin and of Man.  He was succeded by his son King Lagman, who reigned at the time of the “Sack of Isla” by Magnus Barefoot .  Lagman was taken prisoner.  He latterly, after a short reign of seven years, embraced Christianity, abdicated in favour of his brother, Olave the Red, and went to Palestine to fight for the Holy Sepulchre.  He is buried at Jerusalem.
2) Olave the Red, third son of Godred Crovan, and father of the princess Regnaldis.
3)  The Isle of Man
4)  Isla, so called in Fingalian Poetry. Approaching the island at dusk from the south, the skyline presents the appearance of a bent bow – “Tha e crom mar bhogha air ghleus.”
5) Dunyveg or Dùn Naomhaig Castle, more properly, Dùn Aonghais Bhig, abbreviated “aobhaig.” This was the House of Aengus, or Aonghas Beag, son of Erc, 498.”

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31829
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mackenziefiona/birlinn.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/12851
https://wiki1.sch.im/wiki/pages/i063V5H9/Birlinn_Ghorree_Crovan_.html
https://soundcloud.com/cairistiona-dougherty/birlinn-ghorree-chrovan

http://www.iomguide.com/kingorrysgrave.php
http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/hist1900/ch13.htm

La Galea di Godred Cròvan

Read the post in English

Godred Cròvan (in irlandese antico”Gofraid mac meic Arailt“) fu un capo norreno che regnò su Dublino, re dell’Isola di Man e delle Isole nella seconda metà del XI secolo.
Godred nelle leggende mannesi è diventato Re Orry,  Godred e Re Orry sono associati a numerosi siti archeologicisu Man e Islay.  Come governante di Dublino e delle Isole, Godred dominò incontrastato sul Mare d’Irlanda.

VERSIONE MANNESE: Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan

George Broderick, Douglas Fargher e Brian Stowell (studiosi ed editori nonchè compilatori del Dizionario Inglese-gaelico mannese) hanno scritto il testo in mannese adattandolo a una melodia delle isole Ebridi. Si racconta dello sbarco della galea di King Orry sull’isola di Man.
Cairistiona Dougherty & Paul Rogers live (oppure here)
Scran

 Gaelico mannese
O vans ny hovan O,
Hirree O sy hovan;
O vans ny hovan O,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Kiart ayns lhing ny Loghlynee
Haink nyn Ree gys Mannin
Tessyn mooiryn freayney roie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
II
Datt ny tonnyn, heid yn gheay
Ghow yn skimmee aggle;
Agh va fer as daanys ayn,
Hie yn Ree dy stiurey.
III
Daag ad Eeley er nyn gooyl
Shiaull’ my yiass gy Mannin;
Eeanlee marrey, raunyn roie,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
IV
Hrog ad seose yn shiaull mooar mean,
Hum ny maidjyn tappee –
Gour e vullee er y cheayn,
Cosney’n Kione ny hAarey.
V
Stiagh gy Balley Rhumsaa hie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan;
Ooilley dooiney er y traie
Haink dy oltagh’ Gorree.
VI
Jeeagh er Raad Mooar Ghorree heose
Cryss smoo gial ‘sy tuinney,
Cowrey da ny Manninee
Reiltys Ghorree Chrovan.

O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Right in the era of the Norsemen,
Their king came to Mannin,
Running across surging seas,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
II
The waves swoll up and the wind blew,
The crew were frightened,
But there was one brave man,
The King went to steer.
III
They left Islay behind them,
Sailing southward to Mannin,
Sea birds and seals running,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
IV
They raised the main-sail,
The oars dipped quickly,
Onwards on the sea,
Reaching the Point of Ayre.
V
Into Ramsey went,
Gorree Crovan’s longship,
Every man on the beach,
Come to salute Gorree.
VI
Look at the Milkey-Way above,
Brightest band in the heavens,
A sign to the Manx,
Of the Gorree Crovan’s government.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
la galea di Godred Grovan (1)
I
Proprio nell’era degli Uomini del Nord
il loro re venne a Man
attraversa il mare mosso
la galea di Godred Grovan
II
Le onde si agitano e soffia il vento
l’equipaggio era spaventato
ma c’era un uomo coraggioso,
il Re che andò al timone
III
Lasciarono Islay alle spalle
e navigarono verso sud fino a Man,
con gli uccelli marini  e le foche correva
la galea di Godred Grovan
IV
Alzarono la vela maestra
e calarono i remi
avanzando sul mare
per raggiungere Point of Ayre (2)
V
A Ramsey (3) andò
la galea di Godred Grovan
ogni uomo sulla spiaggia
venne e salutare (4) Godred
VI
Guarda la via lattea
la striscia più luminosa nei cieli,
un segno per i Mannesi
del governo di Godred Grovan

NOTE
1) nell’originale il nome  è declinato con la pronuncia mannese Ghorree Chrovan
2) la punta più a Nord dell’Isola di Man
3) Ramsey città costiera nel nord dell’isola di Man: punto di approdo del guerriero vichingo Godred Crovan intorno al 1079 venuto a soggiogare l’isola e renderla il suo regno
4) il fatto raccontato è ovviamente successivo alla conquista perchè la prima volta gli isolani cercarono di difendersi dai Vichinghi, e nei pressi dello sbarco della galea ci fu una violenta battaglia e non una folla festante!!

VERSIONE SCOZZESE: Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain

La canzone fu composta da  Duncan Johnston di Islay (Donnchadh MacIain 1881-1947) e pubblicata nel suo libro “Cronan nan Tonn” (The Croon of the Sea in italiano Il canto del mare) 1938/9. Il viaggio però è raccontato al contrario, la galea  lascia l’isola di Man per andare a Islay e al comando non c’è il re  ma il figlio Olaf.

The Sound of Mull, trio di Tobermory, Isle of Mull : Janet Tandy, Joanie MacKenzie e David Williamson. (strofe I, II, IV)

Robin Hall & Jimmy Macgregor  (strofe I, IV)

Testo in gaelico scozzese
di Duncan Johnston

Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
Air Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain
I
Fichead sonn air cùl nan ràmh,
Fichead buille lùghmhor,
Siùbhlaidh ì mar eun a’ snàmh,
Is sìoban thonn ‘ga sgiùrsadh.
II
Suas i sheòid air bàrr nan tonn !
Sìos gu ìochdar sùigh i !
Suas an ceòl is togaibh fonn,
Tha Mac an Righ ‘ga stiuireadh !
III
A’bhìrlinn rìoghail ‘s i a th’ann
Siubhal-sìth ‘na gluasad
Sròl is sìoda àrd ri crann
‘S i bratach Olaibh Ruaidhe
IV
Dh’ fhàg sinn Manainn mòr nan tòrr,
Eireann a’ tighinn dlùth dhuinn,
Air Ile-an-Fheòir tha sinn an tòir
Ged dh’ èireas tonnan dùbh-ghorm
V
Siod e ‘nis-an t-eilean crom!
Tìr nan sonn nach diùltadh,
Stòp na dìbhe ‘thoirt air lom
‘S bìdh fleadh air bonn ‘san Dùn duinn!

The Corries The Barge O’ Gorrie Crovan, una versione più guerresca

THE BARGE OF GORRIE CROVAN
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
The barge of Gorrie Crovan
I
Behind the oars, a score so brave,
A lusty score to row her,
She sails away like bird on wave,
While foaming seas lash o’er her.
II
Up she goes on ocean wave !
Down the surge she wails O,
Sing away; the chorus, raise,
A royal prince; he sails her !
III
The royal galley onward skims,
With magic speed, she sails O,
Aloft her silken bunting swims,
Red Olav’s Banner waving.
IV
The towers of Man we leave away,
Old Erin’s hills we hail O,
On Islay’s shore her course we lay
Though billows roar and rave O.
V
See the island bent like bow,
Where kindly souls await us;
The Castle hall, I see it now,
The feast’s for us prepared O
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
la galea di Godred Grovan  (1)
I
Dietro ai remi una ventina di prodi
una vigorosa ventina voga,
si allontana come uccello sull’onda
la galea di Godred Grovan
II
Va sull’onda del mare
e sotto l’onda geme
canta e il coro s’alza
un principe di stirpe reale la naviga
III
La galea regale scivola in avanti,
sospinta magicamente
innalza il vessillo di seta, è l’insegna di Olaf il Rosso (2) che sventola
IV
Le torri di Man (3)  lasciamo  e salutiamo le colline della vecchia Irlanda, sulla riva di Islay dirigiamo la rotta, anche se i flutti ruggiscono e ribollono
V
Vedi l’isola (4) dalla forma arcuata
dove animi gentili ci attendono
la sala del Castello (5), ora vedo
il festino è per noi preparato

NOTE
1) nelle note alla canzone l’autore commenta: “Godred, o Gorry Crovan era, secondo le antiche saghe, il figlio di Harald il Nero di Isla. La tradizione vuole che sua madre fosse una donna della sconfitta Casa di Angus Beag, figlio di Erc, che occupò Isla nel 498. Questo spiega la sua notevole popolarità sia con la parte norrena che celtica nelle terre d’occidente. Sua nipote, Regnaldis (Raonaild), figlia di Olave il Rosso, in seguito sposò Somerled, che sostituì Olave come Re delle Isole. Somerled fondò la Dinastia del Re delle Isole  (Lords of the Isles), con sede sull’isola di Loch Finlagan a Isla.
Godred era un celebre guerriero dell’XI secolo. Agì come alfiere del re di Norvegia nella battaglia di Stamford Bridge, nel 1066. Scappando da quell’orrore, si diresse verso l’Isola di Man, e da lì a Isla, dove innalzò il suo stendardo. Sia Vichinghi che Celti si riunirono sotto le sue insegne. Con un grande contingente, attraversò il nord dell’Irlanda (Ulster) e conquistò tutto quello che  si trovava di fronte fino alle porte di Dublino, che si arrese. Per un certo periodo, ha combattuto con successo contro il re di Scozia. A Isla era considerato protetto da dio  per la sua cavalleresca  impresa  nel liberare l’isola da un enorme sauro che aveva la tana vicino all’attuale villaggio di Bridgend. Molti dei nostri clan e i clan dell’ovest possono rivendicare di discendere da Godred. MacDougalls, MacDonalds, MacAllisters, MacRuaries, MacRanalds, MacIains, ecc.
Morì a Isla nel 1095 e la sua tomba è contrassegnata da un enorme masso bianco, conosciuto localmente come “An Carragh Ban“. Ha fondato la Dinastia del Regno delle Isole, di Dublino e di Man. Gli successe suo figlio Re Lagman, che regnò ai tempi del “Sacco di Isla” di Magnus Barefoot. Lagman fu fatto prigioniero. In seguito, dopo un breve regno di sette anni, abbracciò il cristianesimo, abdicò in favore di suo fratello, Olave il Rosso, e andò in Palestina a combattere per il Santo Sepolcro. È sepolto a Gerusalemme.”
2) Olaf (Olave) il rosso  era il terzo figlio di Re Godfrey Grovan
3) l’Isola di Man
4) l’isola di Islay,  la “regina delle Ebridi” avvicinandosi da sub sembra abbracciare la nave
5)  Dunyveg o Dùn Naomhaig Castle

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31829
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mackenziefiona/birlinn.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/12851
https://wiki1.sch.im/wiki/pages/i063V5H9/Birlinn_Ghorree_Crovan_.html
https://soundcloud.com/cairistiona-dougherty/birlinn-ghorree-chrovan

http://www.iomguide.com/kingorrysgrave.php
http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/hist1900/ch13.htm

A WARNING OLD SONG: MAIDEN NEVER WEDD AN OLD MAN!

Leggi in italiano

A Scottish humorous song, “Maids When You’re Young Never Wed An Old Man” discourages young women in marrying men who are too old, and its song, between irony and bitterness, is a warning to all.
The great difference in age between the two spouses was still a custom until the mid-1900s: older men married to twenties girls, who played the role of ante litteram carers!

The humor of the song springs from the allusive but never explicit language and the most obscene words are beeped maidenas “faloorum” and “ding doorum”: at first the young woman is courted by the older man and agrees to marry him, but when it’s time for going to bed she discovers that unfortunately her old man is impotent. So as soon as the old man falls asleep the girl, she throws herself into the arms of a young and manly lover.

Nowaday this song makes us smile but in the nineteenth century it was considered rather spicy: the simple allusion to sex was vulgar but the reference to impotence and adultery had to be outrageous! Despite everything, it became a popular song in Scotland, England, Ireland and America. The first publication dates back to 1869 in “Ancient Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads” by David Herd under the title “Scant of Love, Want of Love”.

The Dubliners (Verses 1-3-4-5-6-7) The song was seen to be offensive due to its sexualized themes and was banned by RTÉ and the BBC

Mairi  Morrison & Alasdair Roberts in Urstan, 2012 (verses 1-2-4-3) for a more sober version. The CD was commissioned by Scotland’s Center for Contemporary Arts as a tribute to Gaelic music and culture. An artistic collaboration increasing freshness and creativity.

Lucy Ward in “Adelphi Has to Fly” 2011, nominated Best Traditional Track BBC Folk Awards 2012.

CHORUS
For he’s got no faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum

He’s got no faloorum,
fadidle  all day
He’s got no faloorum,
he’s lost his ding doorum
so maids when you’re young,
never wed an old man

I
An old man  came courting me,
hey ding dooram day (1)
An old man came courting me,
me being Young(2)
An old man came courting me,
all for to  marry me(3)
Maids, when you’re young never wed an old man
II
When we sat down to tea,
hey doo me darrity
When we sat down to tea, me being young
When we sat down to tea, he started teasing me
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
III
When we went to church,
hey ding dooram day
When we went to church,
me being young
When we went to church,
he left me in the lurch (4)
Maids when you’re young, never wed an old man
IV
When we went to bed,
hey ding doorum day
When we went to bed, me being young
When we went to bed,
he lay like he was dead (5)
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man
V
So I threw me leg  over him ,
hey ding dorum da
I flung me leg over him, me being young
I flung me leg over him, damned nearly smothered him
Maids when you’re young never wed an old man.
VI
When he went to sleep,
hey ding doorum day
When he went to sleep, me being young
When he went to sleep, out of bed I did creep
Into the arms of a handsome young man
VII
And I found his faloorum,
fadidle eye-oorum
I found his faloorum,
fadidle all day
I found his faloorum, he got my ding doorum
So maids when you’re young never wed  an old man
VIII
I wish this old man would die,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
I wish this old man would die, me being Young
I wish this old man would die, I’d make the  money fly
Girls, for your sake, never wed an old man
IX
A young man is my delight,
hey-ding-a  doo-rum
A young man is my delight, me being Young
A young man is my delight, he’ll kiss you day  and night
Maids, when you’re young, never wed an old  man

NOTE
1) or “Hey do a dority”
2) or Hey-do-a-day
3) or Fain wad he mairry me
4) or ” I left him in the lurch”
5) or “he neither done nor said”, and” he lays like a lump of lead”

https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/anoldmancamecourting.html
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/
never_wed_an_old_man_pmcnamara.htm

http://sangstories.webs.com/anauldmancamcourtin.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/m/maidswhe.html