Archivi categoria: Musica cornica/ Cornish music

Helston Flora Day (Cornwall)

Leggi in italiano

 

In Helston, Cornwall it takes place every year on 8 May the Furry Dance (Flora or Floral dance) in the Feast of St. Michael. The meaning of Furry is found in the root of the gaelic  fer = fair. Inside the program of the tipical dance there is a sacred representation with historical and mythical theme, which unfolds in a procession that starts from the church: the characters are Robin Hood and his brigade, Saint George and Saint Michael, which announce the arrival of Spring.
1834733

SEE MORE 

THE FURRY DANCE

The dance is a very long promenade of young couples (and not really young) parading behind the band: they are for the most part walking (or hopping step) alternating a couple of turns with their partner. There are two shows, one in the morning and the second in the midday with more formal dresses (long dress and elaborate hat for ladies, tight and top hat for gentlemen: of British origin, the tight or taitè also called morning dress because worn during the day, it is the male dress in public ceremonies and for all occasions concerning the English royal family.)


THE GAMES OF ROBIN HOOD

In the late Middle Ages the “Robin Hood Games” were practiced during the May Day. It began with a parade of the various characters of the legendary Robin Hood, the masks of the horse and the dragon and the May pole brought by the oxen. The May pole was then raised and a dance took place around it. After the buffoon performances of the horse and dragon masks the competition began: the challenge of archery.
At the end people dancing around the May pole until late. Tradition has lasted until the end of the nineteenth century

img013

LINK
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

More commonly known under the title “Hal an tow” is the main song in the representation of mummers at Flora Day in Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band from ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband from Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arranged in rock version has become very popular among the groups of the genre celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o

NOTES
1)  The translation of Hal an tow could be “May day garland” (halan = calende) and the same name was attributed to the groups of youths who, early in the morning, went into the woods to cut the branches of the May and brought them to the village dancing and singing for the arrival of Spring.
But many scholars tend to refer to the meaning of “heel and toe,” referring to the dance step of the Morris dancing.
Another interpretation translates it as “pulling the rope” (from the Dutch “Haal aan het Touw” derived from the Saxon) referred to the work of the sailors on the ships but also to the game of tug of war, one of the few survivors from the May Games by Robin Hood. Some interpret all the stanzas in a seafaring key, as if the song were a sea-shanty and explain the term “rumbelow” as the rum in the vessel at the time of the pirates!
What shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.How do you deny the reference to the deer god and, more generally, to the symbolism of the deer as a sacred animal, the bearer of fertility? see more
3) Shirley Collins:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: the image is ironic about the Spaniards who eat goose feathers by english arrows to whom the roast goose is mockingly due as the winners
5)  Shirley Collins:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) St George day in many populations of the Mediterranean rural world, represents the rebirth of nature and the arrival of Spring, the Saint has inherited the functions of a more ancient pagan deity associated with solar cults: St. George defeating the Dragon became the solar god who defeats the darkness. see more
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Our Lady  Originally, therefore, the invocation was a prayer referring to the goddess of spring. In other versions the sentence becomes”The Lord and Lady bless you” 

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html

Obby Oss Festival

Leggi in italiano

 

On May 1, in Padstow, a characteristic event called “Obby Oss Festival” is celebrated, centered on the Hobby Horse dance; Padstow is a small fishing port of North Cornwall on the mouth of the river Camel, now a tourist destination.

padstow oss
Oss and his teazer

The Oss are two, one of the Red group(the old horse) and the other of the Blue group (a more recent addition of the Victorian era): the masks are identical, looking fierce and black dressed , which emerge from a characteristic round shape (a circle of 2 meters) edged to the ground by the black fabric: the horses are led by their “teazers” a jugglers with a characteristic stick followed by a cortege of dancers and musicians (mostly drums and accordions): the dominant color in the parade is the white with red or blue depending on the group.

The Oss during his dance – revolving on himself and kicking – seems to war with the teazer or he is courting the young women, who if dragged under the mantle of the oss will become pregnant within the year (or they will get married by the year if they are still young maids)!

Alan Lomax and Peter Kennedy and filmmaker George Pickow collected footage at Padstow in 1951

AT THE BEGINNIG

It is not easy to find the origins of the ritual that is celebrated in Padstow, some indications come from the history of the village: the first settlement was the monastery built by St. Petroc in his mission of evangelization (VI century), but it was destroyed by a Viking raid in 981. Thus the monks moved further inside to Bodmin. Some hypothesize that the ceremony took place on that occasion as an extreme attempt at defense.
obby_oss_sHistorical references of the Oss date back to the late Middle Ages (early 1500) with traces still in the Victorian era: in 1803 is documented the presence of a horse made with the skin of a stallion with a man inside who sprinkled water on the crowd.

Some scholars trace the ritual to pre-Christian celebrations, connected with the Celtic festival of Beltane. Donald R. Rawe compare the oss to thehobby  horses of the Morris dances that are associated with the May fertility rites. (see also the Robin Hood games for the May day). The branches of the May brought into the village, the symbolic coupling with the young women kidnapped under the skirts by the oss, the death and rebirth of the same oss are clear references to fertility that are part of the May Celtic celebrations. However little else can be affirmed with certainty and the verses of the “daytime” singing are rather obscure.
Equally numerous are the references to the winter rituals of Samain that began at the end of October and ended after about twelve days. During the Christmas period the disturbing mask of a horse (hodden or hooden horse), is led through the streets of the village by a “tamer” who held it by the bridle: the children tried to mount the horse and people throw sweets or coins into the mouth of the animal as propitiatory offers. see more

SPRING RITE OF DEATH-REBIRTH

In the singing the Padstow May Song (mostly they repeats the first verse) at some point the music stops the Oss collapses to the ground, the teaser caresses him with his characteristic bat and they sing a kind of dirge funeral
Oh where is Saint George? Oh where is he-O?
He’s out in his longboat, all on the salt sea-O.
Up flies the kite, down falls the lark-O.
Aunt Ursula Birdhood, she had an old ewe,
And she died in her own park-O.
The oss dies then the “teaser” screams “Oss Oss” and the crowd answers “We Oss” thus the Oss comes back to life and gets up again to resume the dances..

Death-Resurrection of the Oss

Once between the two Oss was engaged a dance-fight, now the two parades march through the streets without ever meeting until late in the evening around the May Pole, before returning to their respective stables.

VIDEO
1930: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFW3xlSn3Ow
1932: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdDvOfUCfXk
1953: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA_e3LV6z0E
2012: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-17911942

THE FAREWELL

The parade lasts all day from the morning around 11 am until evening and obviously several men alternate to play the Oss. At the end of the festival the Farewell to the Oss is sung with the phrase:
Farewell farewell my own true love
Farewell farewell my own true love

FAREWELL
I
How can I bear to leave you
One parting kiss I’ll give you
I’ll go what ‘ere befalls me
I’ll go where duty calls me
II
No more will I behold thee
Nor in my arms enfold thee
With spear and pennant glancing
I see the foe advancing
III
I think of thee with longing
Think though while tears are thronging
That with my last faint sighing
I whispered soft whilst dying

NIGHT SONG : Drink To The Old ‘Oss

The ritual of the oss begins, however, the night of May 1, at the stroke of midnight and until about two o’clock, with the Night Song, a clear song of begging, in which the youngsters are alerted to go into the woods to cut the branches of May: whoever sings asks in exchange for good phrases (prosperity, health, happiness) a little beer!

NIGHT SONG
I
Unite and unite and let us all unite,
For summer is a-come unto day,
And whither we are going we will all unite,
In the merry morning of May.
II
I warn you young men everyone
For summer is a-come unto day,
To go to the green-wood and fetch your May home
In the merry morning of May.
III
Arise up Mr. —- and joy you betide
For summer is a-come unto day,
And bright is your bride that lies by your side,
In the merry morning of May.
IV
Arise up Mrs. —- and gold be your ring,
For summer is a-come unto day,
And give to us a cup of ale the merrier we shall sing,
In the merry morning of May.
V
Arise up Miss —- all in your gown of green
For summer is a-come unto day,
You are as fine a lady as wait upon the Queen,
In the merry morning of May.
VI
Now fare you well, and we bid you all good cheer,
For summer is a-come unto day,
We call once more unto your house before another year,
In the merry morning of May


Steeleye Span live (they have recorded the song several times)

DAY SONG
I
Unite and unite, and let us all unite
For summer is a-comin’ today.
And whither we are going we all will unite,
In the merry morning of May.
II
The young men of Padstow, they might if they would,
For summer is a-comin’ today.
They might have built a ship and gilded it with gold
In the merry morning of May.
III
The young women of Padstow, they might if they would,
For summer is a-comin’ today.
They might have built a garland with the white rose and the red
In the merry morning of May.
IV
Oh where are the young men that now do advance
For summer is a-comin’ today.
Some they are in England and some they are in France
In the merry morning of May.
V
Oh where is King George? Oh where is he-O?
He’s out in his longboat, all on the salt sea-O.
Up flies the kite, down falls the lark-O.
Aunt Ursula Birdhood, she had an old ewe,
And she died in her own park-O.
VI
With the merry ring and with the joyful spring,
For summer is a-comin’ today.
How happy are the little birds and the merrier we shall sing
In the merry morning of May.

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

PADSTOW MAY SONG
I
Unite and unite
For summer is a-come unto day,
Unite and unite,
In the merry morning of May.
II
With the marry ring
For summer is a-come unto day
Adieu the marry spring
In the merry morning of May
III
Arise up Mr. …
In the merry morning of May.
IV
Unite and unite and let us all unite,
For summer is a-come unto day,
And whither we are going we will all unite,
In the merry morning of May.
V
Oh where is King George?
Oh where is he-O?
He’s out in his longboat,
all on the salt sea-O.
Up flies the kite,
down falls the lark-O.
Aunt Ursula Birdhood,
she had an old ewe,
And she died in her own park-O.

TEXT MEANINGS

The May branches brought into the village, the symbolic coupling with the young women kidnapped under the skirts from the oss, the death and rebirth of the same oss are clear references to fertility that are part of the May Celtic celebrations. However little else can be affirmed with certainty and the verses of the “daytime” singing are rather obscure.
The young people who build a ship and cover it with gold, could symbolize the solar ship, and the theme of rebirth in a new afterlife it is the journey of purification of the soul of the deceased to the Hereafter.
The garland of red and white roses of young women (the colors of Beltane) symbolizes the union of the masculine principle with the feminine one and takes up again the theme of fertility propitiation. Even the last stanza is a clear reference to the lark, a messenger between the human and the divine, representation of youthful exaltation, a sacred and solar bird, symbol of good luck.
The interpretation of the verse already mentioned on the occasion of the funeral dirge in which the apparent death of the Oss is represented is very problematic!
Oh where is King George? Oh where is he-O?

oldossWHICH KING GEORGE?
The reference to the Hanover dynasty would start any historical dating to 1700, but on closer inspection the king is actually Saint George: it is precisely at this point when the Oss is about to die killed by the jester, that is Saint George who defeats the dragon, he is the solar god, who defeats the darkness, the Spring that defeats Winter.
But the most enigmatic of all is Aunt Ursula Birdhood with her old sheep! And here is the fantasy gallops and a local legend recalls an old woman who brought together the women of Padstow to drive away the Viking raiders (in another version become French) while the men were all out to sea to fish: disguised with the Obby Oss and guiding the women in a dancing procession to the beach Orsola has managed to get rid of the marauders convinced to see a monster!!
Some scholars see Birdwood as a mispronunciation of Birdwood and then link it to the figure of Robin Hood extensively connected to the celebration of May since the Middle Ages. Others recall the pagan myth concerning the goddess Freyja (or Sant’Orsola) who, with the name of Horsel or Ursel, welcomed the dead girls into the aftermath.

 second part

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/padstow.html
http://celtic.org/hobby.pdf
http://www.padstowlive.com/events/padstow-may-day http://grapewrath.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/chris-wood-andy-cutting-following-the-old-oss/

SANS DAY CAROL

Taddeo Gaddi, Madonna del Parto

La tradizione medievale del Natale voleva che le case fossero decorate da rami di sempreverde, in particolare agrifoglio ed edera, affinche il princio maschile e quello femminile si unissero; l’Agrifoglio emblema del principio maschile nel suo trionfo invernale è così rivisitato dal Cristianesimo e identificato con la figura salvifica di Gesù Cristo (prima parte).
Per meglio dire però nei canti di Natale si attua un ribaltamento di significati: è il principio femminile incarnato in Maria a diventare la regina della foresta.

LA VERSIONE CORNICA: Sans day carol

La versione è nota con il titolo St Day Carol dal villaggio di St Day in Cornovaglia dove è stata trascritta solo in epoca vittoriana. In “The Oxford Book of Carols” (1928) si scrive “The Sans Day or St Day Carol was so named because the melody and the first three verses were taken down at St Day in the parish of Gwennap, Cornwall … We owe the carol to the kindness of the Rev. G. H. Doble, to whom Mr W. D. Watson sang it after hearing an old man, Mr Thomas Beard, sing it at St Day. A version in Cornish was subsequently published ( Ma gron war’n gelinen ) with a fourth stanza, [… a berry as blood is it red …], here translated and added to Mr Beard’s English version.”

Nella tradizione cornica diversamente dalla versione inglese di “The Holly and the Ivy”  è stata mantenuta più chiaramente la struttura melodica della carola medievale nella sua forma di danza saltellante.

Artisan in Christman is come in, 2009

The Chieftains in “The Bells of Dublin” 1991


I
Now the holly she (1) bears a berry
as white(2) as the milk,
And Mary bore Jesus,
all wrapped up in silk:
CHORUS
And Mary she bore Jesus
our Saviour for to be,
And the first tree in the greenwood,
it was the holly. Holly! Holly!
II
Now the holly she bears a berry
as green as the grass,
And Mary bore Jesus,
who died on the cross:
III
Now the holly she bears a berry
as black as the coal,
And Mary bore Jesus,
who died for us all
IV
Now the holly she bears a berry,
as blood is it red,
Then trust we our Saviour,
who rose from the dead
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
bianca come il latte
e Maria porta  Gesù
in fasce di seta
CORO
e Maria porta  Gesù
per essere il nostro Salvatore
e il primo albero della foresta
è l’agrifoglio. Agrifoglio! Agrifoglio!
II
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
verde come l’erba
e Maria porta  Gesù
che morì sulla croce
III
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
nera come carbone
e Maria porta  Gesù
che morì per noi tutti
IV
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
rossa come il sangue
così confidiamo nel nostro Salvatore
che risorse dalla morte.

NOTE
1) Testualmente si ribalta il significato che l’antica religione aveva attribuito all’albero “esorcizzandolo”, così l’agrifoglio diventa “She” simbolo del principio femminile, è infatti paragonato a Maria
2) è ovviamente il fiore dell’agrifoglio ad essere bianco. Le bacche (sull’agrifoglio femmina) sono verdi e d’autunno diventano di un rosso lucido simile a corallo. Ma qui i colori sono chiaramente simbolici

continua

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thehollybearsaberry.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/ Hymns_and_Carols/holly_and_the_ivy.htm http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/ Hymns_and_Carols/sans_day_carol.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=114408
http://www.christmas-carol-music.org/CDs/SansDay.html

PADSTOW WASSAIL

Wassail_BowlL’antica tradizione del wassailing cioè delle bevute benaugurali durante le festività natalizie: al brindisi si accompagnavano delle strofe cantate in coro o intonate da un solista e con un ritornello corale, così dai primi riti pagani per stimolare la fertilità degli alberi si passa alle visite benaugurali di porta in porta nei villaggi, che ripetevano le antiche strofe ed altre ne aggiungevano, alla salute dei padroni di casa e alla loro prosperità.

WASSAIL SONGS

Facciamo perciò un giro per la campagna britannica: dalla Cornovaglia arrivano una grande varietà di wassail soFlag_of_Cornwall_svgngs il canto più diffuso ha come ritornello la frase
“With our Wassail, 
and Joy be to our jolly Wassail

BODMIN WASSAILING
GRAMPOUND WASSAIL
JACOBSTOW WASSAIL
MALPAS WASSAIL
PADSTOW WASSAIL
TWELFTH DAY CAROL
WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL
INDICE WASSAIL SONGS

Padstow è un piccolo porto di pescatori della Cornovaglia settentrionale sulla foce del fiume Camel (ora a vocazione turistica) rinomato per il suo Obby Oss Festival.
Così anche le tradizioni rituali della stagione invernale vengono perpetuate con i canti di questua durante i 12 giorni di Natale.
Questa versione del wassail ci viene da Charlie Bate ed è una variante locale del CORNWALL WASSAIL visto qui

ASCOLTA Andy Turner – voce e organetto


I
O master and mistress,
our Wassail begin
Pray open your doors
and let us come in
CHORUS
With our wassail,
wassail, wassail, wassail
And joy comes with our jolly wassail.
II
O master and mistress
sitting down by the fire
While we poor wassail boys
are travelling the mire
III
Good master and mistress,
sitting down at your ease,
Put your hands in your pockets
and give what you please
IV
Good master and mistress,
now can you forbear,
I’ll fill up our bowl
with cider and beer
V
We hope that your apples
will prosper and bear
And bring forth good cider
for this time next year
VI
We hope that your barley
will prosper and grow
And bring forth good beer
for you to bestow
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Oh padrone e padrona
inizia il nostro wassail,
aprite la porta per favore
e fateci entrare.
CORO
Con il nostro wassail,
Wassail, Wassail, 
Wassail,
e gioia sarà con l’allegro wassail. 
II
Oh padrone e padrona
seduti accanto al focolare
mentre noi poveri ragazzi del wassail andiamo in giro nel fango.
III
Buon padrone e padrona
che state belli comodi,
mettete le mani in tasca
e dateci quello che volete.
IV
Buon padrone e padrona
ora non potete astenervi,
riempirò la vostra coppa (1)
con sidro e birra.
V
Vi auguriamo che i vostri meli
porteranno tanta prosperità
e daranno tanto  buon sidro
per l’anno prossimo
VI
Vi auguriamo che il vostro orzo
crescerà in abbondanza
e porterà tanta buona birra
per voi da immagazzinare

NOTE
1) in origine erano i questuanti a distribuire la bevanda del wassail portandola di casa in casa per il brindisi benaugurale

FONTI
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2016/01/01/week-228-padstow-wassail/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/padstowwassail.html

THE TWELFTH DAY CAROL

L’antica tradizione del wassailing cioè delle bevute benaugurali durante le festività natalizie: al brindisi si accompagnavano delle strofe cantate in coro o intonate da un solista e con un ritornello corale, così dai primi riti pagani per stimolare la fertilità degli alberi si passa alle visite di porta in porta nei villaggi, che ripetevano le antiche strofe ed altre ne aggiungevano, alla salute dei padroni di casa e alla loro prosperità.

WASSAIL SONGS

Facciamo perciò un giro per la campagna britannica: dalla Cornovaglia arrivano una grande varietà di wassail soFlag_of_Cornwall_svgngs quella più diffusa ha come ritornello la frase
“With our Wassail, 
and Joy be to our jolly Wassail

ARCHIVIO CORNISH WASSAIL
BODMIN WASSAILING
GRAMPOUND WASSAIL
JACOBSTOW WASSAIL
MALPAS WASSAIL
PADSTOW WASSAIL
TWELFTH DAY CAROL
WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL
INDICE WASSAIL SONGS

THE TWELFTH DAY CAROL

“Carol For The Twelfth Day” è stato registrato da Louis Killen in Old Songs, Old Friends LP nel 77, il testo proviene da un manoscritto di “Cornish Carols” redatto da Davies Gilbert per John Hutchens nel 1826 (pubblicato successivamente dalla Oxford University Press).

Il testo è un po’ ampolloso anche se sostanzialmente segue la tipica struttura delle wassail songs: la richiesta di aprire la porta per far entrare i questuanti per far portare tanto buon cibo; in cambio si brinda alla salute della famiglia; qui si aggiunge una buona dose di nostalgia per i cari vecchi tempi, quelli in cui la gentry terriera elargiva un banchetto per i servitori, cibo e bevande per i poveri, si insiste infatti sul concetto che è arrivato il momento per i ricchi di spartire la tavola con la povera gente, per evitare “disordini” o “malcontenti”
Julaftonen_av_Carl_Larsson_1904
ASCOLTA John Boden, 2010

I
Sweet master of this habitation
with our mistress be so kind,
As to grant an invitation that we may this favour find;
To be now invited in and in joy and mirth begin,
Happy, sweet and pleasant songs which unto this time belong.
CHORUS:
Let every loyal, honest soul
contribute to our wassail bowl.

II
So now may you enjoy the blessings of a loving, virtuous wife,
Riches, honour now possessing and a long and happy life;
Living in prosperity, endless generosity
Always be maintained, I pray, don’t forget the good old way.
III
So now before the season is departed in your presence we appear,
Therefore then be noble-hearted and afford some dainty cheer;
Pray let us have it now what the season doth allow,
What the house may now afford should be placed upon the board.
Whether it be roast-beef or fowl and liquor well our wassail bowl.
IV
For now it is the season of leisure then to those who kindness show,
May they have wealth and peace and pleasure and the spring of bounty flow,
To enrich them while they live that they may afford to give,
To maintain the good old way, many a long and happy day.
V
Therefore you are to be commended if in this you will not fail,
Now our song is almost ended fill our bowl with nappy ale(1);
And we’ll drink a full carouse to the master of this house,
Aye and to our mistress dear, wishing both a happy year
With peace and love without control who liquored well our wassail bowl.
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Caro padrone di questa abitazione con la nostra padrona siate così gentili e concedeteci un invito che ci sia favorevole;
di essere subito fatti entrare per iniziare in gioia e allegria;
con felici canzoni dolci e piacevoli, che sono consuetudine di questo periodo.
CORO
Che ogni anima di fede e onestà contribuisca alla nostra ciotola del brindisi!
II
Così ora che voi possiate godere le benedizioni di un amorevole moglie virtuosa, oneste ricchezze e una vita lunga e felice; vivendo sostenuto dalla prosperità e dalla generosità infinita, vi prego di non dimenticare le buone e vecchie usanze.
III
Così ora prima che la stagione finisca veniamo alla vostra presenza, pertanto e quindi siate di cuore nobile e offrite qualche buona grazia; vi preghiamo di darci ora ciò che la stagione offre, ciò che la casa può ora permettersi che sia messo in tavola, che si tratti di roast-beef o uccellagione o liquori buoni per la nostra coppa del brindisi.
IV
Perchè ora è la stagione del tempo libero quando coloro che mostrano la bontà, possono avere la prosperità e la pace e la gioia e il rinnovarsi dei benefici, affinchè si arricchiscano per poter elargire quanto possono dare, per mantenere le buone e vecchie usanze, in una molto lunga e felice giornata.
V
Pertanto, sarete degno di lode se in questo non mancherete, ora che la nostra canzone è quasi finita, di riempire la nostra coppa di birra schiumosa (1) e leveremo un brindisi per il padrone di questa casa e alla nostra cara padrona, augurando a entrambi un felice anno in pace e amore senza fare caso a chi si ubriaca con la nostra coppa del brindisi.

NOTE
1) nappy ale: una birra forte con molta schiuma

FONTI
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah09/ah09_14.html
http://roy25booth.blogspot.it/2011/12/dont-forget-good-old-way-nappy-ale-both.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/carolfortwelfthday.html

APPLE WASSAILING IN CORNWALL

Wassail_BowlL’antica tradizione britannica del wassailing cioè delle bevute benaugurali durante le festività natalizie: al brindisi si accompagnavano delle strofe cantate in coro o intonate da un solista e con un ritornello corale, così dai primi riti pagani per stimolare la fertilità degli alberi si passa alle visite benaugurali di porta in porta nei villaggi, che ripetevano le antiche strofe ed altre ne aggiungevano, alla salute dei padroni di casa e alla loro prosperità. (continua)

WASSAIL SONGS

Facciamo perciò un giro per la campagna britannica: dalla Cornovaglia arrivano una grande varietà di wassail soFlag_of_Cornwall_svgngs quella più diffusa ha come ritornello la frase
“With our Wassail, 
and Joy be to our jolly Wassail

ARCHIVIO CORNISH WASSAIL
BODMIN WASSAILING
GRAMPOUND WASSAIL
JACOBSTOW WASSAIL
MALPAS WASSAIL
PADSTOW WASSAIL
TWELFTH DAY CAROL
WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL
INDICE WASSAIL SONGS

JACOBSTOW WASSAIL

ivi.borinC’è una Jacobstow sia nel Devon  che in Cornovaglia. Questo wassail proviene dalla poderosa collezione di canti popolari del reverendo anglicano Sabine Baring-Gould: Songs and Ballads of the West 1889-1891, A Garland of Country Songs 1895.
Il wassail prende anche il nome di Robin Redbreast wassail essendo il pettirosso lo spirito dell’albero e il re dell’anno nuovo che trionfa sullo scricciolo (che rappresenta l’anno passato vittima sacrificale nel giorno di Santo Stefano qui )


ASCOLTA The Watersons (su Spotify)


I
Wassail, wassail,
Good master and mistress,
sitting down by the fire,
While we poor wassailers
be dabbling in the mire,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast
he has a fine wing,
Give us of your cider (1)
and we’ll begin to sing,
With a jolly wassail
II
Wassail, wassail,
Good master and mistress,
our wassail begin,
Please open your door
and let us come in,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast
he has a fine song,
Give us of your cider,
we won’t keep you long,
With a jolly wassail.
III
Wassail, wassail,
Your ale cup is white
and your ale it is brown,
Your beer is the best
that e’er can be found,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast
he has a fine leg,
Give us of your cider,
and we’ll begin to beg,
With a jolly wassail.
IV
Wassail, wassail,
Your gin it is brew’d
from the juniper tree,
Your gin is the best
that ever can be,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast
he has a fine toe,
Give us of your cider,
and we’ll begin to go,
With a jolly wassail.<
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Alla Salute, 
Buon padrone e padrona
seduti accanto al camino
mentre noi poveri questuanti squazziamo nel fango
con una grolla dell’allegria
Oh il piccolo pettirosso
ha delle belle ali,
dateci il vostro sidro
e noi inizieremo a cantare
con una grolla dell’allegria
II
Alla Salute, 
Buon padrone e padrona
la nostra questua inizia
aprite la porta per favore
e fateci entrare
con una grolla dell’allegria
Oh il piccolo pettirosso
ha una bella canzone,
dateci il vostro sidro
e non vi tratterremo a lungo
con una grolla dell’allegria

III
Alla Salute,
la vostra coppa è chiara
e la vostra birra è scura
la vostra birra è la migliore
che si possa trovare
con una grolla dell’allegria
Oh il piccolo pettirosso
ha una bella gamba,
dateci il vostro sidro
e chiederemo l’elemosina
con una grolla dell’allegria

IV
Alla Salute,
il vostro gin è fabbricato
dall’albero del ginepro
il vostro gin è il migliore
che si possa trovare
con una grolla dell’allegria
Ohil piccolo pettirosso
ha un bel piede
dateci il vostro sidro
e noi ce ne andremo
con una grolla dell’allegria

NOTE
1) Cibo delle fate che può rendere immortali o rimettere in salute i malati la mela è alla base della preparazione del sidro, una bevanda poco alcolica ottenuta dalla fermentazione di frutti come mele, pere o le dimenticate nespole, tipica del Regno Unito, dei Paesi Baschi e della Normandia continua

MALPAS WASSAIL

La versione è diffusa nel fiabesco villaggio di Malpas dove il fiume Fal si divide in due rami e più genericamente nei dintorni della cittadina di Truro. L’area per il suo clima ameno è ricca di frutteti e più frequentemente nelle strofe si rievocano gli antichi rituali del wassailing nel frutteto

ASCOLTA The Watersons


I
Now the harvest being over
And Christmas drawing in
Please open your door
And let us come in
Chorus
With our wassail
Wassail, wassail
And joy come to our jolly wassail
II
Here’s the master and mistress
Sitting down by the fire
While we poor wassail boys
Do trudge through the mire
III
Here’s the master and mistress
Sitting down at their ease
Put your hands in your pockets
And give what you please
IV
This ancient awd house
We will kindly salute
It is your custom
You need not dispute
V
Here’s the saddle and the bridle
They’re hung upon the shelf
If you want any more
You can it sing yourself
VI
Here’s an health to the master
And a long time to live
Since you’ve been so kind
And so willing to give
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ora il raccolto è finito
e il Natale si avvicina
aprite la porta per favore
e fateci entrare
CORO
Con il nostro wassail

Wassail, wassail
e gioia sarà con l’allegro wassail. 
II
Oh padrone e padrona
seduti accanto al focolare
mentre noi poveri ragazzi del wassail siamo in giro nel fango
III
Oh padrone e padrona
che state belli comodi,
mettete le mani in tasca
e dateci quello che volete.
IV
Questa antica vecchia casa
saluteremo gentilmente
come è nostra usanza
non c’è che dire
V
Ecco la sella e la briglia
sono appesi alla mensola
e se ne volete di più
potete cantare voi stessi
V
Alla salute del padrone
che possa vivere a lungo
poichè siete stati così gentili
e generosi nel dare

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/jacobstowewassail.html
http://www.wildharmony.org.uk/index.php/wassailing/54-other-wassail-songs/126-jacobstowe-wassail
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/malpaswassail.html

BODMIN WASSAILING

Dalla Cornovaglia arrivano una grande varietà di wassail songs quella più diffusa ha come ritornello la frase
“With our Wassail,
and Joy be to our jolly Wassail

ARCHIVIO CORNISH WASSAIL

BODMIN WASSAILING
GRAMPOUND WASSAIL
JACOBSTOW WASSAIL
MALPAS WASSAIL
PADSTOW WASSAIL
TWELFTH DAY CAROL
WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL

BODMIN WASSAILING

A Bodmin, Cornovaglia sopravvive un’antica usanza attestata almeno dal 1642 quando iniziarono le visite del wassailing a partire dalla casa del Sindaco della cittadina (con la wassail bowl donata da Nicholas Sprey l’allora segretario comunale). Oggi il 6 gennaio, il dodicesimo giorno del Natale, il Bodmin Wassailing è una maratona di 12 ore di canti, brindisi e raccolta fondi per beneficenza.
La particolarità degli odierni wassailers (rigorosamente uomini) è la marsina nera e il capello a cilindro, un’eleganza che denuncia la natura “urbana” di questo wassailing, una “divisa” che omaggia la tradizione vittoriana e la consacra. I canti sono rigorosamente tramandati di generazione in generazione e seguono una scaletta precisa a partire dal “Welcoming wassail” passando per il “St Colomb wassail song” per chiudere immancabilmente con gli auguri per un Felice Anno Nuovo! (per i testi qui)

Jocelyn Murgatroyd 2011
Jocelyn Murgatroyd 2011

Detta più comunemente “The Old Song” è la WASSAIL SONG PRIOR TO DEPARTURE


CHORUS

Wassail! Wassail! Wassail! Wassail!
I am joy come to our jolly wassail!
I
This is our merry night (1)
for choosing King and Queen (2)
now be it your delight
that something may be seen
in our Wassail.
II
Is there any butler here
or dweller in this house?
I hope you take a full carouse,
and enter to our bowl in our Wassail.
III
We fellows are all poor (3)
can’t find no house nor land
unless we do gain in our Wassail.
IV
Our Wassail bowl to fill
with apples and good spice!
Now grant us your good will
taste here once or twice of our Wassail.
V
So now we must be gone
to seek for more good cheer,
where bounty will be shown,
as we have found it here in our Wassail.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
Wassail! Wassail! Wassail! Wassail!
sono felice di venire con l’allegro wassail

I
Questa è la nostra felice notte
per eleggere Re e Regina
che sia la vostra gioia
di poter vedere qualcosa
nel nostro brindisi
II
C’è un qualche maggiordomo qui
o un abitante della casa?
Spero che facciate baldoria
ed accogliate la nostra grolla della salute
III
Noi compagni siamo tutti poveri
e non abbiamo casa e terra
a meno che non ci guadagniamo con il nostro Wassail
IV
Per riempire nostra grolla
di mele e buone spezie
dateci adesso la vostra attenzione
assaggiate una o due volte il nostro wassail
V
Così ora dobbiamo andare
in cerca di altri saluti
dove sarà mostrata generosità
come abbiamo trovato qui in questo wassail

NOTE
1) i 12 giorni della festività solstiziale iniziano secondo la tradizione più moderna dal 25 dicembre il giorno del natale di Gesù, e terminano il 6 gennaio. La stessa strofa ricorre anche nel “A carroll for a wassell-bowl” cantata nello Staffordshire e nel Warwickshire (vedi) la merry night è chiaramente la dodicesima notte
2) nella dodicesima notte si cucinava un dolce speciale contenente un fagiolo chi lo avesse trovato nella sua fetta sarebbe stato eletto Re del Fagiolo. Nelle isole britanniche le torte erano due, una del re e una della regina (con un pisello celato all’interno). La tradizione di questo dolce speciale è comune in buona parte d’Europa anche se le ricette cambiano vedi
3) la strofa è piuttosto sorprendente sentita cantare dall’allegra compagnia di gentlemen del Bodmin Wassailing!

FONTI
http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/cornwall/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8428000/8428234.stm
http://calendarcustoms.com/articles/bodmin-wassailing/
https://cornucopiaalchemy.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/the-bodmin-wassail-by-andrew-ormerod-6th-january-2014/

Il canto dell’usignolo in Cornovaglia

Read the post in English

In Italia l’usignolo ritorna a metà marzo e riparte a settembre per svernare al caldo. Il suo canto, melodioso, potente, presenta una notevole varietà di modulazioni e fraseggi, da consumato interprete canoro, tant’è che si può parlare di un repertorio personale diverso da uccello a uccello.
Nella tradizione popolare l’usignolo è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, immortalato da Shakespeare nel “Romeo e Giulietta” canta presso il melograno ed è la scelta tra la vita e la morte: restare nel talamo nunziale e morire o partire per l’esilio (e forse la salvezza)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

GIULIETTA
Vuoi andare già via? Ancora è lontano il giorno:
non era l’allodola, era l’usignolo
che trafisse il tuo orecchio timoroso:
canta ogni notte laggiù dal melograno;
credimi, amore, era l’usignolo.
ROMEO
Era l’allodola, messaggera dell’alba,
non l’usignolo. Guarda, amore, la luce invidiosa
a strisce orla le nubi che si sciolgono a oriente;
le candele della notte non ardono più e il giorno
in punta di piedi si sporge felice dalle cime
nebbiose dei monti. Devo andare: è la vita,
o restare e morire.

Così il canto dell’usignolo ha assunto una caratteristica negativa, egli non è il cantore della gioia come l’allodola bensì della malinconia e della morte.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Dettaglio affresco Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompei

L’affresco nella Casa del Bracciale d’Oro, a Pompei,  databile fra il 30 e il 35 d.C. raffigurante delle scene tratte da un giardino boschivo,  ritrae un usignolo solitario tra i tralci di rosa.
E proprio i suo celarsi notturno nel fitto del bosco lo ha accostato a un certo filone di canti triviali con doppi sensi allusivi alla sfera erotica e il suo dolce canto è un invito ad abbandonarsi ai piaceri del sesso.
La canzone di tradizione popolare è nata probabilmente in Cornovaglia con i titoli di “Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” o “Down in those valleys below”.
Il testo di “Sweet Nightingale” fu pubblicato nel Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England di Robert Bell, (1857) con il commento  “Questa curiosa canzonetta – che si diceva di tradotta dall’antica lingua della Cornovaglia … l’abbiamo sentita per la prima volta in Germania … I cantanti erano quattro minatori della Cornovaglia, che all’epoca, il 1854 , lavoravano in alcune miniere di piombo vicino alla città di Zell. Il capo, o capitano, John Stocker, disse che la canzone era la prediletta dei minatori della Cornovaglia e del Devonshire, ed era sempre cantata nei giorni di paga e nelle veglie; e che suo nonno, che morì 30 anni prima all’età di cento anni, cantava la canzone, e diceva che era molto vecchia. “Sfortunatamente Bell non riuscì a ottenere una copia del brano da questi minatori, e alla fine si affidò a un gentiluomo di Plymouth che “fu costretto a riempire un po ‘qua e là, ma solo quando una brutta rima, o piuttosto nessuna, rendeva evidente quale fosse la vera rima. L’ho letto a un gentiluomo del settore minerario a Truro, e dice che è molto vicino al modo in cui lo cantiamo. “La melodia più cantata è stata raccolta dalla Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould di E.G. Stevens di St. Ives, Cornovaglia. ” (Tratto da qui)

Della canzone si conosce anche una versione in gaelico con il titolo “An Eos Hweg”, una traduzione  però più recente sulla scia del revival delle tradizioni celtiche in quel di Cornovaglia. (vedi). E’ un canto popolare intonato spesso dalla gente nei pubs oggi in repertorio nei gruppi corali.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968


I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI:
“Amore mio, accompagnami!
Non senti il canto appassionato,
le dolci note che l’usignolo effonde?
Non senti la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti?
II
Amore mio non ti sbagliare
perchè io porterò il tuo secchio(2)
al sicuro nella tua capanna, strada facendo potrai sentire la storia d’amore del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
III LEI:
“Ti prego di lasciarmi sola,
ho le mie di mani.
Con te non verrò
ad ascoltare  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
IV LUI:
“Ti prego stenditi
a terra con me,
su questa riva dove cresce la dolce primula
potrai sentire  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
V
Questa coppia decise
di sposarsi con celerità(3)
e subito alla chiesa andarono.
Lei non aveva più timore
di camminare nel bosco
e nelle valli sottostanti

NOTE
1) Pretty Bets o Betty oppure Sweet maiden
2) la fanciulla era una lattaia e il giovanotto si offre di portarle a casa il secchio con il latte appena munto
3) di certo la fanciulla era rimasta incinta

continua

FONTI
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

LE FESTE DI MEZZ’INVERNO IN CORNOVAGLIA: PER GLI SPIRITI RIBELLI

MONTOL EVE: THE WINTER SOLSTICE FESTIVAL

montolbannerA Penzance, in Cornovaglia, si festeggia la Montol Eve ovvero la “vigilia del solstizio”, una festa del fuoco relativamente moderna nata nel 2007 con il titolo di Montol Festival e che si svolge tra il 14 e il 21 dicembre senza aver avuto interruzioni. La notte del 21 dicembre la festa si conclude con una fiaccolata in maschera e l’immancabile grande falò, ma la festa racchiude tutta una serie di simboli e antiche tradizioni radicate nel passato.
Un “fiume di fuoco” si snoda per le vie della cittadina alimentato da ogni genere di lanterne giganti di fabbricazione artigianale e fiaccole portate in processione, e accompagnato da un vasto assortimento di musicisti tradizionali e da banda, nonché danzatori (guize dancers), per aiutare il sole nel suo giorno più corto e più faticoso..
Le maschere sono ispirate all’eleganza dei costumi d’antan per lo più in bianco e nero (i colori tipici della Cornovaglia) e alle mascherine in stile veneziano, con una grande abbondanza di lustrini, piume e nastri variopinti, con addobbi che si avvalgono delle più moderne “tecnologie” da luminarie natalizie, come le luci led a batteria indossate nei copricapi o nei costumi.

THE LORD OF MISRULE

In Italiano si traduce come “Il Signore del Malgoverno” -ovvero il Signore del Disordine o il Re Fagiolo- nominato dalla sorte (in genere dal fagiolo presente nel pezzo di dolce o focaccia spartito tra i commensali) per presiedere la Festa dei Folli, una festa che deriva molto probabilmente dai Saturnali degli antichi romani ma anche dalle feste di mezz’inverno dei popoli nordici, traslata nel nostro calendario nella festa di Carnevale.

THE GUIZE DANCERS

Ecco una descrizione delle maschere per la festa di mezz’inverno che si teneva in Cornovaglia ancora nell’Ottocento: “During the early part of the last century the costume of the guise dancers often consisted of such antique finery as would now raise envy in the heart of a collector. The chief glory of the men lay in their cocked hats which were surmounted with plumes and decked with streamers and ribbons. The girls were no less magnificently attired with steeple crowned hats, stiff bodied gowns, bag skirts or trains and ruffles hanging from their elbows.” (in Traditions and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall (1870–80) di William Bottrell)
Proprio come le maschere veneziane, che sono solo una delle tante tradizioni del ballo in maschera così come si svolgeva nell’alta società durante le feste più importanti dell’anno; una tradizione sartoriale rimasta ancorata ad abiti di foggia settecentesca (l’ultimo carnevale storico coincise con la caduta della Serenissima) con profusione di pizzi intorno alla gola e ai polsi, tabarri e tricorni. Vero è che a Venezia il Carnevale aveva la funzione di pubblico divertimento in cui anche le classi più umili si potevano mescolare agli aristocratici e travestirsi indossando la Bauta (un tricorno nero, la larva ovvero la tipica maschera bianca e un tabarro) o altre maschere e travestimenti più popolani. Nel Medioevo il Carnevale a Venezia aveva una durata lunghissima e iniziava il 26 dicembre per terminare con il mercoledì delle Ceneri.

THE KASEK -NOS

Anche in questa celebrazione fa capolino l’Oss soprannominato Kasek-Nos, ovvero the Montol ‘Oss, la versione locale dell’hobby horse. Ma ci sono anche altre guize beasts come l’ariete o il corvo

CHALKING THE MOCK

La processione arriva fino al punto più alto della città per guardare bruciare il mock ovvero un ceppo natalizio (Yule log) dalle dimensioni gigantesche. Durante la processione il Kasek-Nos sceglie una persona tra il pubblico:
“Here, a member of the public is chosen at random by Kasek Nos. The chosen ’victim’ then chalks a rough ‘stick figure’ on the ‘Mock’ which is the Cornish version of the Yule log. The Lord of Misrule announces to the crowd ‘According to our tradition this represents the end of the old and the beginning of the new!’ before the Mock is put onto the ceremonial fire.” (tratto da qui)

TOM BAWCOCK EVE

Nella vicina città di Mousehole la processione si svolge la notte del 23 dicembre ed è dedicata a Tom Bawcock, un leggendario abitante del posto, che scongiurò una carestia riuscendo a uscire in mare nonostante l’inverno burrascoso, e a riportare un bel po’ di pesce, subito cucinato e festeggiato con una Stargazy pie: una torta salata di patate, uova e pesce (teste e code comprese perchè la gente era così affamata che nessuna parte del pesce venne scartata).

La torta è ancora oggi servita nello Ship Inn pub, mentre la gente del posto si raduna nel pub fin dal pomeriggio per cantare le canzoni tradizionali, e in particolare una canzone che è stata scritta nel 1927 (o perlomeno questa è la data di pubblicazione sul giornale Old Cornwall) da Robert Morton Nance (1873-1959)  su di una vecchia melodia tradizionale detta ‘Wedding March’

DIALETTO CORNICO
I
A merry plaas you may believe
woz Mowsel pon Tom Bawcock’s Eve.
To be theer then oo wudn wesh
To sup o sibm soorts o fesh!
II
Wen morgee brath ad cleard tha path
Comed lances for a fry,
An then us had a bet o scad
an starry gazee py.
III
Nex cumd fermaads, braa thustee jaads
As maad ar oozles dry,
An ling an haak, enough to maak
a raunen shark to sy!
IV
A aech wed clunk as ealth wer drunk
En bumpers bremmen y,
An wen up caam Tom Bawcock’s naam
We praesed un to tha sky.


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
A merry place, you may believe,
Was Mousehole ‘pon
Tom Bowcock’s Eve;
To be there then who wouldn’t wish
To sup of seven sorts of fish,
When morgy(1) broth
had cleared the path
Comed lances(2) for a fry
And then us had a bit scad(3)
And starry gazey pie(4).
Next comed fairmaids(5),
bra’ thrusty jades(6)
As made our uzzles dry
And ling and hake,
enough to make
A raunin'(7) shark to sigh.
As each we’d clunk
as health were drunk
In bumpers(8) brimming high
And when up came
Tom Bawcock’s name
We praised him to the sky.
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
Un posto allegro, si creda
era Mousehole
alla Vigilia di Tom Bowcock
per essere lì allora chi non avrebbe desiderato cenare con sette tipi di pesce?
Quando il brodo di palombo(1)
ha ripulito la strada
arrivarono le anguille(2) per un fritto misto
e allora abbiamo preso un bel po’ di sgombri(3)
e per una torta starry gazey(4)
poi arrivarono le sardine(5)
???(6)
che ci hanno fatto seccare le gole
e abbastanza merluzzo e nasello
da far sospirare uno squalo affamato(7).
Per ogni sorso del brindisi alla salute
ci ubriacammo
in alto si alzarono i calici(8)
e quando si levò
il nome di Tom Baw
lo lodammo fino al cielo

NOTE
1) morgy o murgy= dogfish
2) lances= sand-eels
3) scad= horse mackerel
4) starry gazey= guardando le stelle perchè la testa delle sarde sbuca dalla torta per guardare verso l’alto: io ritengo che la storia nasconda sotto il pretesto della carestia una sorta di incantesimo del mare per favorire una buona pesca per l’anno a venire! vedasi ad esempio Fish in the sea
5) fairmaids= pilchards;
6) jades= hussies ma tuttavia non riesco a tradurre la frase perchè non so che pesce sia l’hussy?!
7) rauning= ravenous/hungry
8) bumpers= glasses

FONTI
http://www.academia.edu/3795328/Morris_and_Guize_Dance_Traditions_in_Cornwall
http://www.cornishculture.co.uk/montol.html
http://www.gemmagary.co.uk/guize/guize-dancing-the-gyptians-kasek-nos/
http://www.an-daras.com/merv_davey_thesis/md-thesis-App-4-6-Penzance_Guizing_Montol_Festival.pdf

http://www.cornishculture.co.uk/tom.htm
http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A87819484
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41803
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/CORNISH/2003-12/1071546486
https://www.pinterest.com/thesneak50/stargazy-pie-recipes/

WASSAILING: THE CORNISH WASSAIL SONGS

Wassail_BowlL’antica tradizione del wassailing cioè delle bevute benaugurali durante le festività natalizie: al brindisi si accompagnano delle strofe cantate in coro o intonate da un solista e con un ritornello corale, così dai primi riti pagani per stimolare la fertilità degli alberi si passa alle visite di porta in porta nei villaggi, che ripetevano le antiche strofe ed altre ne aggiungevano, alla salute dei padroni di casa e alla loro prosperità. (introduzione e archivio generale qui)

WASSAIL SONGS

Dalla Cornovaglia arrivano una grande varietà di wassail songs il canto più diffuso ha come ritornello la frase
“With our Wassail, 
and Joy be to our jolly Wassail

BODMIN WASSAILINGFlag_of_Cornwall_svg
GRAMPOUND WASSAIL
JACOBSTOW WASSAIL
MALPAS WASSAIL
PADSTOW WASSAIL
TWELFTH DAY CAROL
WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL

INDICE WASSAIL SONGS

CAN WASSAIL

La versione in cornico

Nadelek yu gyllys ha’n bledhen noweth ow-tos
Ygereugh darrajow h’abereveth gwren dow


Chorus:
Gans agan Wassel
Wassel, Wassel, Wassel
Lowena dh’agan jolyf Wassel


A vestres ha mester, owth-esdha yn chy
Rag dre lys ny mbyon y travalyn-ny


An chy coth ma hagar dynerghy ny a vyn
Ny res dheugh kedryna usadow us dhyn


Otta ny y’ n le-ma, yn un rew ny a sef
Mebyon Wassel fest jollyf gans cogen y’n luf


Ny a wayt agas avallennow bos spedys dhe dhon
Dry newodhow mos arta omma pan on


Ny a wayt agas barlys bos spedys yn tek
Ma ‘gas bo lanwes gans helder mar plek


A vestres ha mester, fatel yllough hepcor
Orth lenwel agan cogen a syder ha cor


A vestres ha mester, yn esedhys attes
Whyleugh agas pors ha reugh nebes, my a ‘th pys


Bennath warnough lemmyn ha bewnans fest hyr
Aban veugh mar guf h’agas helsys mar vur

WEST CORNWALL WASSAIL

Si tratta del brano più conosciuto tra le wassail songs della tradizione cornica. La struttura del canto è standardizzata seppure con una discreta varietà di strofe:
1) reclame della bevanda con la richiesta di aprire la porta per far entrare i questuanti;
2) richiesta di un offerta in danaro (sottolineando l’agiatezza e la generosità dei proprietari);
3) brindisi alla salute della famiglia, alla prosperità del bestiame e dei raccolti.


I

O mistress, at your door
our Wassail begins (1),
pray open the door
and let us come in (2)
Chorus
With our Wassail,
Wassail, Wassail, Wassail,

and Joy be to our jolly Wassail
II
O Master and mistress
sitting down by the fire,
while we poor Wassail-boys
are travelling thro’ the mire
III
O Master and mistress,
sitting down at your ease,
put your hands in the pockets
to give what you please
IV
We wish you a Merry Christmas
and a long time to live,
because you’re so free
and so willing to give
V
We wish you a Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year,
with plenty of money
and a barrel of beer.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Oh Signora alla vostra soglia
inizia la nostra questua
aprite la porta per favore
e fateci entrare.
CORO
Con il nostro wassail,
Wassail, Wassail, 
Wassail,
e gioia sarà con  il nostro allegro wassail. 
II
Oh padrone e padrona
seduti accanto al focolare
mentre noi poveri questuanti
andiamo in giro nel fango.
III
Oh padrone e padrona
che state belli comodi,
mettete le mani in tasca
e dateci quello che volete.
IV
Vi auguriamo un Buon Natale
e di vivere a lungo,
perchè siete così prodigali
e così generosi nel dare.
V
Vi auguriamo un Buon Natale
e un Felice Anno Nuovo
e abbondanza di danaro
e barili di birra.

NOTE
1) wassail si traduce con brindisi (benaugurale), ma qui ha significato di questua
2) strofa alternativa: Now Christmas is comin and New Year begin Pray open your doors and let us come in.

Ancora una variante da Grampound (spartito vedi)
ASCOLTA Du Hag Owr (simpaticissimo questo gruppetto di “arditi marinai”)

la versione testuale è abbastanza simile a quella cantata che ho riportato un po’ ad orecchio e un po’ dalle trascrizioni di versi simili


I
Now here at this house
we first shall begin
To drink the king’s (queen’s) health such a custom has been
And here at your door
we orderly stand
With jolly wassail
and our hats in our hand
Chorus
With our Wassail,
Wassail, Wassail, Wassail,

oh Joy be to our jolly Wassail
II
We wish a good health
to the master and dame
To all you good people
we wish it the same
and for this good liquor
to us that you bring (3)
We lift up our voices
we merrily sing
III
We hope that your orchards (4)
will prosper and grow
That you may have cider
and beer to bestow
And where you have one bushel (5) we hope you’ll have ten
That you may have liquor
against we come again
IV
We wish you a Merry Christmas
and long may you live,
because you’re willing
and free to give
We wish you a Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year,
with plenty of money
and a barrel of beer.
V
Now jolly old Christmas
thou welcomest guest
Thou from us are parting
which makes us look wisht (6)
For all the twelve days (7)
are now come to their end
And this the last day
of the season we spend
VI
And for the great kindness
that we have received
We return you our thanks,
and we now take our leave
From this present evening
we bid you adieu
Until the next year
and same season ensue
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Adesso qui presso questa casa
per prima inizieremo
a bere alla salute della regina
come è consuetudine
e qui alla vostra porta
stiamo composti
con l’allegra questua
e i cappelli in mano
CORO
Con il nostro wassail
Wassail, Wassail, Wassail,

e gioia sarà con il nostro allegro wassail. 
II
Auguriamo buona salute
al signore a alla signora
e a tutti voi brava gente
auguriamo lo stesso,
e per questo buon liquore
che per noi portate,
alzeremo le nostre voci
per cantare in allegria
III
Speriamo che i vostri frutteti
prosperino e crescano
che possiate avere sidro
e birra da immagazzinare
e dove avete un moggio
speriamo che ne avrete dieci
affinchè possiate avere liquore
di nuovo per quando ritorneremo
IV
Vi auguriamo un Buon Natale
e di vivere a lungo,
perchè siete così generosi
e prodigali nel dare.
Vi auguriamo un Buon Natale
e un Felice Anno Nuovo
e abbondanza di danaro
e barili di birra.
V
Vecchio e allegro Natale
tu ospite più benvenuto
tu da noi ti diparti
che ci fai sembrare tristi
perchè tutti i 12 giorni
sono ora giunti alla fine
e questo ultimo giorno
della stagione trascorriamo
VI
E per la grande generosità
che abbiamo ricevuto
vi diamo in cambio i nostri auguri;
e ora noi ci congediamo
da questa sera
vi diciamo addio
fino al prossimo anno
e l’arrivo della stessa stagione

NOTE
3) non sono più i questuanti a portare la grolla della salute, ma sono i padroni di casa ad offrire da bere
4) il brindisi ai frutteti (in particolare ai meli) ricorda la forma più antica della celebrazione Wassail che prevedeva la benedizione degli alberi e delle api, così importanti per l’impollinazione, al fine di garantire un raccolto sano per il prossimo anno. (continua)
5) il bushel (traducibile in italiano come “moggio” o “staio”) è una vecchia unità di misura che equivale alla quantità contenuta in un tipico cesto a due manici utilizzato per la raccolta delle mele.
6) la traduzione è a senso wistful vuol dire pensieroso, malinconico, triste
7) i 12 giorni della festività solstiziale iniziano secondo la tradizione più moderna dal 25 dicembre, il giorno del natale di Gesù, e terminano il 6 gennaio (vedi) La notte del wassailing è quindi quella del 5 gennaio

FONTI
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Cornish_Wassail.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/west_cornwall_wassail.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/wassail_song-3.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/cornish_wassail-3a.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/cornish_wassail-3c.htm
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/154.html
http://www.focsle.org/songbooks/folkinfo/songs/pdf/154.pdf