Archivi categoria: FILM

Heave away, my Johnny sea shanty

Leggi in Italiano

The second sea shanty sung by A.L. Lloyd in the film Moby Dick, shot by John Huston in 1956, is a windlass shanty or a capstan shanty. As we can clearly see in the sequence, crew action the old anchor winch.
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented on the cover notes of the album “Thar She Blows” by Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd (1957)”A favourite shanty for windlass work, when the ship was being warped out of harbour at the start of a trip. A log rope would be made fast to a ring at the quayside and run round a bollard at the pierhead and back to the ship’s windlass. The shantyman would sit on the windlass head and sing while the spokesters strained to turn the windlass. As they turned, the rope would round the drum and the ship nosed seaward amid the tears of the women and the cheers of the men. This version was sung by the Indian Ocean whalers of the 1840s“.

The song starts at 1:50, when the catwalk is pulled off and the old spike windlass is activated, model replaced by the brake windlass around 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) the curse of every sailor at the time of sailing ships: Cape Horn

This sea shanty presents a great variety of texts even with different stories, so sometimes it is a song of the whaleship other times a song of emigration. (a collection of various text versions here).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Dubbing Cape Horn was a feared affair by sailors, being a stretch of sea almost perpetually upset by storms, a cemetery of numerous unlucky ships.
The wind dominated the bow, so the ship was pushed back for days with the crew exhausted by effort and icy water that was breaking on all sides.

Louis Killen from Farewell Nancy 1964  “capstan stands upright and is pushed round by trudging men. A windlass, serving much the same function, lies horizontally and is revolved by means of bars pulled from up to down. So windlass songs are generally more rhythmical than capstan shanties. Heave Away is usually considered a windlass song. Originally, it had words concerning a voyage of Irish migrants to America. Later, this text fell away. The version sung here was “devised” by A. L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick

I
There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.
 
II
The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls, we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
III
Farewell to you, you Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
IV
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.

NOTES
1) Kingston upon Hull (or, more simply, Hull) is a renowned fishing port from which flotillas for fishing in the North Sea started from the Middle Ages. In the song, the departing ships also head for the Indian Ocean (see routes )

NEWFOUNDLAND VERSION

Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook # 49) was released by Pius Power, Southeast Bight,  in 1979 Genevieve Lehr writes “this is a song which was often used to establish a rhythm for hauling up the anchors aboard the fishing schooners. Many of these ‘heave-up shanties’ were old ballads or contemporary ones, and very often topical verses were made up on the spur of the moment and added to the song to make the song last as long as the task itself.”

The Fables from Tear The House Down, 1998 a cheerful version with a decidedly country arrangement

I
Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
 
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
III
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
IV
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”

NOTES
1) duds in this context means “clothes” but more generally the large canvas bag containing the sailor’s baggage
2) Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova for the Marconi experiment, is a city in Canada, capital of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located in the peninsula of Avalon, which is part of the Newfoundland island
3) clearly a “flying” verse taken from the many farewells here is Nancy answering

The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
 emigration song: Yallow girl

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html

Blood Red Roses, a whale shanty

Leggi in italiano

Ho Molly, come down
Come down with your pretty posy
Come down with your cheeks so rosy
Ho Molly, come down”
(from Gordon Grant “SAIL HO!: Windjammer Sketches Alow and Aloft”,  New York 1930)

To introduce two new sea shanties in the archive of Terre Celtiche blog I start from Moby Dick (film by John Huston in 1956) In the video-clip we see the “Pequod” crew engaged in two maneuvers to leave New Bedford, (in the book port is that of Nantucket) large whaling center on the Atlantic: Starbuck, the officer in second, greets his wife and son (camera often detaches on wives and girlfriends go to greet the sailors who will not see for a long time: the whalers were usually sailing from six to seven months or even three – four years). After dubbing Cape of Good Hope, the”Pequod” will head for Indian Ocean.
It was AL Lloyd who adapted  “Bunch of roses” shanty for the film, modifying it with the title “Blood Red Roses”. It should be noted that at the time of Melville many shanty were still to come

Albert Lancaster Lloyd, Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger

It’s round Cape Horn we all must go
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
For that is where them whalefish blow
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
It’s frosty snow and winter snow
under’s many ships they ‘round Cape Horn
It’s your boots to see again
let you them for whaler men

oswald-brierly
Oswald Brierly, “Whalers off Twofold Bay” from Wikimedia Commons. Painting is dated 1867 but it shows whaling and the Bay as it was in the 1840s

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage)


Me bonnie bunch of Roses o!
Come down, you blood red roses, come down (1)
Tis time for us to roll and go
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
We’re bound away around Cape Horn (2), Were ye wish to hell you aint never been born,
Me boots and clothes are all in pawn (3)/Aye it’s bleedin drafty round Cape Horn.
Tis growl ye may but go ye must
If ye growl to hard your head ill bust.
Them Spanish Girls are pure and strong
And down me boys it wont take long.
Just one more pull and that’ll do
We’ll the bullie sport  to kick her through.

NOTES
1) this line most likely was created by A.L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick, reworking the traditional verse “as down, you bunch of roses”, and turning it into a term of endearment referring to girls (a fixed thought for sailors, obviously just after the drinking). I do not think that in this context there are references to British soldiers (in the Napoleonic era referring to Great Britain as the ‘Bonny bunch of roses’, the French also referred to English soldiers as the “bunch of roses” because of their bright red uniforms), or to whales, even if the image is of strong emotional impact:“a whale was harpooned from a rowing boat, unless it was penetrated and hit in a vital organ it would swim for miles sometimes attacking the boats. When it died it would be a long hard tow back to the ship, something they did not enjoy. If the whale was hit in the lungs it would blow out a red rose shaped spray from its blowhole. The whalers refered to these as Bloody Red Roses, when the spray became just frothy bubbles around the whale as it’s breathing stopped it looked like pinks and posies in flower beds” (from mudcat here)
2) Once a obligatory passage of the whaling boats that from Atlantic headed towards the Pacific.
3) as Italo Ottonello teaches us “At the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee compliance with the contract, it was provided in the form of “I will pay”, payable three days after the ship left the port, “as long as said sailor has sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory note at a discounted price, usually of forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind. “The purchasers, boarding agents and various procurers,” the enlisters, “as they were nicknamed,” were induced to ‘seize’ the sailors and bring them on board, drunk or drugged, with little or no clothes beyond what they were wearing, and squandering or stealing all sailor advances.

Sting from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys” ANTI 2006. 
The textual version resumes that of Louis Killen and this musical interpretation is decidedly Caribbean, rhythmic and hypnotic ..


Our boots and clothes are all in pawn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

It’s flamin’ drafty (1) ‘round Cape Horn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

Oh, you pinks and posies Go down,
you blood red roses, Go down
My dear old mother she said to me,
“My dearest son, come home from sea”.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn we all must go
‘Round Cape Horn in the frost and snow.
You’ve got your advance, and to sea you’ll go
To chase them whales through the frost and snow.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn you’ve got to go,
For that is where them whalefish blow(2).
It’s growl you may, but go you must,
If you growl too much your head they’ll bust.
Just one more pull and that will do
For we’re the boys to kick her through

NOTES
1) song in this version is dyed red with “flaming draughty” instead of “mighty draughty”. And yet even if flaming has the first meaning “Burning in flame” it also means “Bright; red. Also, violent; vehement; as a flaming harangue”  (WEBSTER DICT. 1828)

Jon Contino

“Go Down, You Blood Red Roses” is a game for children widespread in the Caribbean and documented by Alan Lomax in 1962

(second part)

LINK
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/debunking-myth-that-go-down-you-blood.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/coming-down-with-bunch-of-roses-lyrics.html

http://songbat.com/archive/songs/english-americas/blood-red-roses
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/bloodredroses.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34080 http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Blood%20Red%20Roses.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/blood.htm http://will.wright.is/post/1367066738/jon-contino

Aileen Duinn, Brown-haired Alan

Leggi in italiano

“Aileen Duinn” is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides: a widow/sweetheart lament for the sinking of a fishing boat, originally a waulking song in which she invokes her death to share the same seaweed bed with her lover, Alan.
According to the tradition on the island of Lewis Annie Campbell wrote the song in despair over the death of her sweetheart Alan Morrison, a ship captain who in the spring of 1788 left Stornoway to go to Scalpay where he was supposed to marry his Annie, but the ship ran into a storm and the entire crew was shipwrecked and drowned: she too will die a few months later, shocked by grief. His body was found on the beach, near the spot where the sea had returned the body of Ailein Duinn (black-haired Alan).

 The song became famous because inserted into the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy and masterfully interpreted by Karen Matheson (the singer of the Scottish group Capercaillie who appears in the role of a commoner and sings it near the fire)

Here is the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy: Ailein Duinn and Morag’s Lament, (arranged by Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in which the second track is the opening verse followed by the chorus

FIRST VERSION

The text is reduced to a minimum, more evocative than explanatory of a tragic event that it was to be known to all the inhabitants of the island. The woman who sings is marked by immense pain, because her black-haired Alain is drowned at the bottom of the sea, and she wants to share his sleep in the abyss by a macabre blood covenant.

Capercaillie from To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, the voice ‘kissed by God’ switches from the whisper to the cry, in the crashing waves blanding into bagpipes lament.

Meav, from Meav 2000 angelic voice, harp and flute

Annwn from Aeon – 2009 German group founded in 2006 of Folk Mystic; their interpretation is very intense even in the rarefaction of the arrangement, with the limpid and warm voice of Sabine Hornung, the melody carried by the harp, a few echoes of the flute and the lament of the violin: magnificent.

Trobar De Morte  the text reduced to only two verses and extrapolated from the context lends itself to be read as the love song of a mermaid in the surf of the sea (see also Mermaid’s croon)

It is the most reproduced textual version with the most different musical styles, roughly after 2000, also as sound-track in many video games (for example Medieval II Total War)

english translation
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go (1) with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(2)
I would drink(3), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
Scottish Gaelic
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\
shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,

NOTES
1) to die, to follow
2) for the inhabitants of the Hebrides Islands the seals are not simple animals, but magical creatures called selkie, which at night take the form of drowned men and women. Considered a sort of guardians of the Sea or gardeners of the sea bed every night or only on full moon nights, they would abandon their skins to reveal their human form, to sing and dance on the silver cliffs (here)
3) refers to an ancient Celtic ritual, consisting in drinking the blood of a friend as a sign of affection (the covenant of blood), a custom cited by Shakespeare (still practiced by all the friends of the heart who exchange blood with a shallow cut and joining the two cuts; it was also practiced for the handfasting in Scotland: once the handfasting was above all a pact of blood, in which the right wrist of the spouses was engraved with the tip of a dagger until the blood spurts, after which the two wrists were tied in close contact with each other with the “wedlock’s band” (see more.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECOND VERSION

Here is the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) from “Songs of the Hebrides“, see also Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) in his “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake from “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  from “Ships Ahoy !” 2011  

(english translation Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(scottish gaelic)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn,
o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat

Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart
an talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

Another translation in English with the title “Annie Campbell’s Lament”
Estrange Waters from Songs of the Water, 2016

Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..

THIRD VERSION

The most suggestive and dramatic version is that reported by Flora MacNeil who she has learned  from her mother. Born in 1928 on the Isle of Barra, she is a Scottish singer who owns hundreds of songs in Scottish Gaelic. “Traditional songs tended to run in families and I was fortunate that my mother and her family had a great love for the poetry and the music of the old songs. It was natural for them to sing, whatever they were doing at the time or whatever mood they were in. My aunt Mary, in particular, was always ready, at any time I called on her, to drop whatever she was doing, to discuss a song with me, and perhaps, in this way, long forgotten verses would be recollected. So I learned a great many songs at an early age without any conscious effort. As is to be expected on a small island, so many songs deal with the sea, but, of course, many of them may not originally be Barra songs”

A different story from Flora MacNeil’s family: the woman is married to Alain MacLeann who dies in the shipwreck with all the other men of her family: her father and brothers; the woman turns to the seagull that flies high over the sea and sees everything, as a witness of the misfortune; the last verse traces poetic images of a funeral of the sea, with the bed of seaweed, the stars like candles, the murmur of the waves for the music and the seals as guardians.

Flora MacNeil from  a historical record of 1951.


English translation
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
Scottish Gaelic
Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

NOTES
(1) Tuesday is still the day on which traditionally marriages are celebrated on the Island of Barra

FOURTH VERSION

Still a version set just like a waulking song and yet a different text, this time the ship is a whaler and Allen is shipwrecked near the Isle of Man.

Mac-Talla, from Gaol Is Ceol 1994, only the female voices and the notes of a harp, but what immediacy …

English translation
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi, I would go with thee.
I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

CHORUS
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
Scottish Gaelic
S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm

Staines Morris to the Maypole haste away

Leggi in italiano
In the TV series “The Tudors” an outdoor May Day has been set up, with the picturesque dancers of the Morris Dance, their rattles and handkerchiefs, the archery, the fight of the roosters, the dances with the ribbons around the May pole, performed by graceful maidens with flower crowns in their hair. The background music is titled “Stanes Morris”, in the video follow two reproductions, the first of  Les Witches group, the second a little slower of The Broadside Band.

The May poles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were very tall and decorated with green garlands, ribbons or two-color striped paintings: the tradition is rooted in England, Italy, Germany and France, a real focal point of the rousing activities at his feet , symbolic fulcrum of the group of dancers.

john-cousen-dancing-round-the-maypole-on-the-village-green-in-elizabethan-times
John Cousen: Ballando intorno al palo del Maggio in epoca elisabettiana

TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY (Staine Morris )

The melody is a dance reported in “The English Dancing Master” by John Playford, first edition of 1651, but already danced at the court of Henry VIII or in the Elizabethan era. In the video it is a Morris Dance while Playford describes it as a country dance (for instructions see)
Morris Dance version
It was William Chappell in his “Popular Music of the Old Time” of (1855-56) to combine the Tudor melody with the text “Maypole song” written in 1655 by Robert Cox for the comedy “Actaeon and Diana” . So Chappell writes “This tune is taken from the first edition of The Dancing Master. It is also in William Ballet’s Lute Book (time of Elizabeth); and was printed as late as about 1760, in a Collection of Country Dances, by Wright.
The Maypole Song, in Actæon and Diana, seems so exactly fitted to the air, that, having no guide as to the one intended, I have, on conjecture, printed it with this tune.

The text invites young people in following Love to dance and sing around the May Pole.
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from ‘Prince Heathen.’ 1969 (simply perfect!)

Shirley Collins from Morris On, 1972, the folk rock experiment of a group of excellent trad musicians John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings  and Dave Mattacks.

Lisa Knapp & David Tibet from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017  (amazing version with a further step ahead of the 70s rock rework)

MAYPOLE SONG
I
Come, ye young men, come along
with your music, dance and song;
bring your lasses in your hands,
for ‘tis that which love commands.
Refrein:
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday,
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday
II
‘Tis the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear:
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
III
Here each bachelor may choose
One that will not faith abuse
Nor repay, with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again
IV
And when you are reckoned now
For kisses you your sweetheart gave
Take them all again and more
It will never make them poor
V
When you thus have spent your time,
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day’s delight.

second part: JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html 
Traditional Music (con spartito)
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/stainesmorris.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60673

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Leggi in italiano

FROM  OUTLANDER SAGA

Diana Gabaldon

“Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.”
(From DRAGONFLY IN AMBER, Chapter 34, “The Postman Always Rings Twice”. Copyright© 1992 by Diana Gabaldon.)
The Scottish women have developed a particular technique for the twisting of the tweed, that woolen fabric from Scotland, warm, resistant and almost indestructible, used by fishermen and shepherds to keep warmer in a climate so cold and windy.
Cloth were “mistreated” by a group of women sitting around a table with 4 beat: first, the fabric is banged on the table in front of you, then slammed towards the center of the table, then returned to the initial position and then is passed to the next woman (clockwise). To count the time and make the work less monotonous the women sang some songs, there was the ban dhuan (or the song-woman) that directed the song, while the others followed her in the refrain. After some songs the fabric was softer, thicker, and more tightly woven.

OUTLANDER TV, season I: “Rent”

In Outlander TV serie this glimpse of life in a scottish village of eighteenth-century, is developed in the Dougal Mackenzie’s journey, as he collects rents from the tenants of Castel Leoch. Claire goes on the road with Dougal, and almost by chance, she hears some voices and sees the women as they are waulking the tweeds.

Outlander I, episode 5: Mo Nighean Donn

English transaltion*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr (1)
[Sèist:]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark
thee
At the fair of the young women.
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
And we will walk hand in hand
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
Regardless of any living elders (2).

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

NOTES
1)  The Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland
2) Similar expressions are recurrent in popular songs when a young couple “swimmed against the tide” about courtship and don’t followed the tradition.  (celtic wedding)

Clair takes part in the fulling of the tweed and sings with the village women. The ban dhuan is Fiona Mackenzie

Two are the Wool Waulking Songs  in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” and “Mo Nighean Donn” (a tribute to Claire’s brown hair)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originally from the island of Barra “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” (One day as I roamed the hills) is about a man roaming around the Highlands, who comes across a beautiful young girl gathering herbs; these accidental encounters on the moors (between the heather and the broom in bloom) are the subject of many traditional Scottish songs from ancient origins, and often man is not limited to the request for a kiss! The girl rejects him because she considers him a vagabond. As usual in the choice of musical tracks, the lyrics always have an affinity with the story told in the saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho

English translation*
One day as I was traveling a hill
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)


(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”


Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh!
A bhodachain ròmaich


(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

NOTES
1) or “Hoots toots!”
2) or ” you shaggy old man!”, a shaggy peasant

Mo Nighean Donn

“Mo Nighean Donn” (My brown-haired lass) does not have a real meaning, it seems more than the ban dhuan to report the gossip of the moment.  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
(a Celtic song with instrumental parts and male voice)

English translation*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
[choir]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
(I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.)

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Read the post in English

DALLA SAGA OUTLANDER

Diana Gabaldon

Nel libro “”Il ritorno” (capitolo 11) della saga Outlander scritta da Diana Gabaldon Claire è invitata dalle donne di Lallybroch a prendere un tè e assiste alla follatura del tweed che si svolge in un apposito capanno “riservato” alle donne della tenuta
““Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.” continua
Le donne scozzesi hanno elaborato una tecnica particolare per la follatura del tweed, quel tessuto di lana originario dalla Scozia, caldo, resistente e pressoché indistruttibile, utilizzato dai pescatori e pastori per tenersi più al caldo in un clima così freddo e ventoso.
Per infeltrire la lana ma in modo uniforme e migliorane le prestazioni  le pezze di stoffa venivano “maltrattate” da un gruppo di donne sedute introno ad un tavolo (precedentemente immerse in grandi tinozze piene di urina); il movimento della battitura consisteva in 4 tempi: prima si sbatteva il tessuto sul tavolo davanti a sé, poi si sbatteva verso il centro del tavolo, quindi si riportava alla posizione iniziale e infine lo si passava alla donna successiva (in senso orario). Per contare il tempo e rendere meno monotono il lavoro le donne cantavano delle canzoni, c’era la  ban dhuan (ovvero la donna-canzone) che dirigeva il canto, mentre le altre la seguivano nel ritornello. Dopo qualche canzone il tessuto diventava più morbido, ma anche più compatto e resistente.

OUTLANDER TV, stagione I: “Riscossione”

Nella serie televisiva questo scorcio di vita nei villaggi della Scozia settecentesca è sviluppato nel giro di Dougal  Mackenzie di Castel Leoch presso gli affittuari per la riscossione dei tributi. Quasi per caso Clarie sentento delle voci, si avvicina alle donne mentre infeltriscono il tweed.

Outlander I episodio 5: Mo Nighean Donn

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark thee
At the fair of the young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta.
O mia brunetta, ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli (2)

NOTE
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna  (matrimonio celtico)

 

Clair partecipa alla follatura del tweed e canta insieme alle donne del villaggio. La ban dhuan è Fiona Mackenzie

Le Wool Waulking Songs sono due in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
la prima più veloce “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh“, la seconda vista nel video “Mo Nighean Donn” (un omaggio ai capelli castani di Claire)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originaria dell’isola di Barra,  la canzone parla di un uomo in giro per le Highland che s’imbatte in una bella fanciulla intenta a raccogliere delle erbe, questi incontri fortuiti nelle brughiere (tra l’erica e la ginestra in fiore) sono il soggetto di molti canti tradizionali della Scozia dalle origini antiche e spesso l’uomo non si limita alla richiesta di un bacetto! La fanciulla lo respinge perchè lo reputa un vagabondo. Come consuetudine nella scelta delle tracce musicali i testi hanno sempre un’attinenza con la storia narrata nella saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho
Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh! (1)
A bhodachain ròmaich
(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

Traduzione inglese*
One day as I was traveling a mountain
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)
(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men (3)
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Un giorno che ero in viaggio per i monti
un giorno che ero in viaggio per la brughiera incontrani una ragazza
dalle belle trecce
con un piccolo pugnale tra le mani
stava tagliando delle margherite
e raccoglieva il crescione.
Mi sono avvicinato
e le ho chiesto un bacio.
“Smamma bello
Vattene zoticone!
(Nella mia dimora di famiglia
si trovano nobili genti
una ventina di uomini con il cappello
una dozzina di donne con il mantello
bianche tovaglie
stese sui tavoli
con tazze di percellana
e bicchieri pieni di birra.)”

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) l’espressione tradotta anche come “Hoots toots!”  è un modo colloquiale per respingere una persona sgradita
2) anche tradotto come ” you shaggy old man!” letteralmente “piccolo vecchio peloso” vecchio ha un significato colloquiale che non necessariemnte indica una persione anziana, nel contesto la frase è un appellativo rivolto a un vagabondo malandato, dai capelli lunghi e la barba incolta, anche bifolco
3) indossare il cappello è d’obbligo per un gentiluomo

Mo Nighean Donn

La canzone “Mo Nighean Donn” (la mia ragazza castana) non ha un vero e proprio significato, sembra più altro che la ban dhuan  riferisca i gossip del momento. La versione in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  è più lunga rispetto alla versione nelle riprese
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
Negli anni 40-50 con il tramonto della lavorazione artigianale (in particolare dell’Harris Tweed) queste canzoni di lavoro sono diventate occasione di session dimostrative o sono passate nei repertori di alcuni gruppi di musica celtica con l’inserimento di parti strumentali e voci maschili.

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by the forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta hò gù
In questo momento sono al lago vicino alla foresta
e Effie non mi sta canzonando.
La milizia è stata ripristinata
e questo porterà via i giovani da noi.
Staranno fuori per un mese
questo  non mancherà di lasciarci pieni di tristezza.
O mia moretta , ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
La mia ragazza bruna ha vinto una scommessa
dove erano accampati i guerrieri
Sono stanco di gettare le reti
nelle parti basse di ogni baia.
Io andrò oltre la collina
dove ci sono le belle donne
giovani.
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli(2)
E la mia mano ti terrà stretta
anche se preferirei abbracciarti
E se riuscirò a raggiungerti (3)
ti metterò una corona tra le mani.
Avrai quella e ancor meglio
un bravo marinaio, giovane e forte

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna .
3) il ragazzo è partito per mare in cerca di un buon guadagno, al suo ritorno le chiederà di sposarlo

 

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Mise Éire – I am Ireland

Leggi in italiano
Patrick Henry Pearse (Pádraic Mac Piarais or Pádraig Pearse) wrote a short poem in Gaelic, about afflicted Ireland, it was 1912 and the Easter Uprising was to came. It’ll be Pearse who read the proclamation of the Irish Republic on the steps of the Post Office occupied by the rebels. His death along with that of his companions on that Easter of Blood of 1916 will be the prelude to the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921)

In 1959 George Morrison made a documentary film about the foundation of the Republic of Ireland that, recalling it to the Pearse poem, he entitled “Mise Éire”: it was a long work of research and cataloging from the newsreels, period films, photos of key figures such as Pádraig Pearse, James Connolly, Éamon de Valera and Michael Collins, to giving back through the reassembly of archival material, a crucial historical period for Irish independence from 1896 to 1918, a twenty-year period that saw the flowering of both political nationalism and Irish culture, the Gaelic League and the Gaelic Athletics Association, the Abbey Theater of WB Yeats and Lady Gregory which ends with the electoral victory of the Sinn Féin party.
The orchestral soundtrack (for the first time combined with an Irish feature film) was entrusted to Seán Ó Riada, who arranged the traditional Irish music and the sean-nós songs (‘old style’) with a classical style.
The Ó Riada soundtrack certainly contributed to the documentary’s pathos, and among the many traditional melodies he also rearranged “Róisín Dubh” renamed as title track “Mise Éire” .
Róisín Dubh (= little black rose) is Rosalinda, a young girl named Little Rose is the allegory of Ireland, a codeword coined at the end of the sixteenth / early seventeenth century to identify Ireland with a Black Rose, ideally contrasted to the Red Rose of the Tudor House (the Lancaster rose).
The Irish Radio Orchestra

But Pearse poem had remained in the background despite hitting target with the title, it will be Patrick Cassidy on the occasion of the centenary of the Easter Uprising, to write his tune for “Mise Éire”, staged for RTÉ ONE with RTÉ Concert Orchestra and sung by the young Irish singer, Sibéal Ní Chasaide

Sibéal Ní Chasaide live ( in “1916 The Irish Rebellion”, 2016)

I am Ireland (1):
I am older than
the old woman (2) of Beare.
Great my glory:
I that bore
Cuchulainn, the valiant.
Great my shame:
My own children
who sold their mother.
Great my pain:
My irreconcilable enemy
who harrasses me continually.
Great my sorrow
That crowd,
in whom I placed my trust,
died.
I am Ireland:
I am lonelier than
the old woman of Beare.
Mise Éire:
Sine mé ná
an Chailleach Bhéarra
Mór mo ghlóir:
Mé a rug
Cú Chulainn cróga.
Mór mo náir:
Mo chlann féin
a dhíol a máthair.
Mór mo phian:
Bithnaimhde
do mo shíorchiapadh.
Mór mo bhrón:
D’éag an dream
inar chuireas
dóchas.
Mise Éire:
Uaigní mé ná
an Chailleach Bhéarra.

NOTE
1) “Just Speak Your Language”
2) Cailleach Bheara cailleach= “veiled one” she is an ancient goddess also revered in Scotland and the Isle of Man. She is associated with Winter, and the creation of the landscape – in particular the cliffs – and with the stone burial mounds. In the aisling song, Ireland is represented as a girl with the appearance of a goddess, but already in the eighteenth-century song Caitilín Ní Uallacháin Ireland is compared to a “poor old woman” (Sean-Bhean bhocht) Ms. Katty Hualloghan – Cathleen or Kathleen Nì Houlihan-, owner of four green fields (ie the four provinces where Ireland is traditionally divided).

 

http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/roisin-dubh/

http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/caitilin-ni-uallachain/

FONTI
https://www.theballadeers.com/ire/oriad_m2006_mise.htm
https://aliisaacstoryteller.com/2017/06/12/who-was-the-old-woman-of-beare/
http://ifi.ie/film/mise-eire/
http://www.itastreaming.online/film/19383-mise-%C3%89ire-1959-streaming-subita.html
http://www.irishpage.com/poems/miseeire.htm
https://quinteparallele.net/2017/03/20/ceol-na-heireann-musiche-classiche-dirlanda-in-sean-o-riada/

Mise Éire – I am Ireland

Read the post in English  

Patrick Henry Pearse (Pádraic Mac Piarais o Pádraig Pearse) scrisse una breve poesia in gaelico irlandese sull’Irlanda afflitta, era il 1912 e la Rivolta di Pasqua era nell’aria. Sarà Pearse a leggere il proclama della Repubblica Irlandese sui gradini dell’Ufficio postale occupato dai ribelli. La sua morte insieme a quella dei suoi compagni in quella Pasqua di Sangue del 1916 darà il via alla guerra d’Indipendenza irlandese (1919-1921)

Nel 1959 George Morrison realizzò un film-documentario sulla fondazione della Repubblica d’Irlanda e, richiamandosi alla poesia di Pearse, lo intitolò  “Mise Éire”: il suo fu un lungo lavoro di ricerca e catalogazione dai cinegiornali, filmati d’epoca, foto di personaggi chiave come Pádraig Pearse, James Connolly, Éamon de Valera e Michael Collins, volto a restituire attraverso il rimontaggio del materiale d’archivio, un periodo storico cruciale per l’indipendenza irlandese che va dal 1896 al 1918, un ventennio che vide la fioritura del nazionalismo irlandese sia politico che culturale, la  Gaelic League e la Gaelic Athletics Association, l’Abbey Theatre di WB Yeats e Lady Gregory e si conclude con la vittoria elettorale del partito Sinn Féin.

LA COLONNA SONORA

La colonna sonora orchestale (per la prima volta abbinata a un lungometraggio irlandese) fu affidata a Seán Ó Riada il quale arrangiò con piglio classicheggiante la musica tradizionale irlandese e i canti sean-nós (‘stile antico’).
Sicuramente a dare pathos al documentario ha contribuito molto la colonna sonora di Ó Riada che  tra le tante melodie tradizionali rielaborò anche “Róisín Dubh” ribattezzata con il titolo di “Mise Éire” come title track.
Róisín Dubh (= little black rose) è  Rosalinda, una fanciulla dal nome di Piccola Rosa, l’allegoria dell’Irlanda, una parola in codice coniata alla fine del Cinquecento/inizi Seicento per identificare l’Irlanda con una Rosa Nera,  contrapposta idealmente alla Rosa Rossa della Casata Tudor (la rosa dei Lancaster).
The Irish Radio Orchestra

Ma la poesia di Pearse era rimasta sullo sfondo pur avendo fatto centro con il titolo, sarà  Patrick Cassidy (oramai acclamato compositore di colonne sonore per film di grande successo) in occasione del centenario della Rivolta di Pasqua a scrivere appositamente la musica per la poesia Mise Éire,  messa in scena per  RTÉ ONE con RTÉ Concert Orchestra  e la voce di Sibéal Ní Chasaide.

Sibéal Ní Chasaide live (anche in “1916 The Irish Rebellion”, 2016)

Mise Éire:
Sine mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra
Mór mo ghlóir:
Mé a rug Cú Chulainn cróga.
Mór mo náir:
Mo chlann féin a dhíol a máthair.
Mór mo phian:
Bithnaimhde do mo shíorchiapadh.
Mór mo bhrón:
D’éag an dream inar chuireas dóchas.
Mise Éire:
Uaigní mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra.


I am Ireland:
I am older than
the old woman of Beare.
Great my glory:
I that bore
Cuchulainn, the valiant.
Great my shame:
My own children
who sold their mother.
Great my pain:
My irreconcilable enemy
who harrasses me continually…
Great my sorrow
That crowd,
in whom I placed my trust,
died.
I am Ireland:
I am lonelier
than the old woman of Beare.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Il mio nome è Irlanda (1):
sono più vecchia
della Velata di Beara (2)
Grande la mia gloria:
io che ho partorito
Cuchulainn, il coraggioso.
Grande la mia vergogna:
i miei stessi figli
che hanno venduto la loro madre.
Grande il mio dolore:
il mio inconciliabile nemico
che mi opprime continuamente
Grande la mia tristezza:
quel popolo,
in cui riposi la mia fiducia,
è morto.
Il mio nome è Irlanda:
sono più sola
della Velata di Beara

NOTE
1) l’Irlanda è la sua lingua, “Just Speak Your Language”, quella dei vecchi antenati il gaelico irlandese
2) Cailleach Bheara cailleach= “la velata” è un’antica dea dell’inverno venerata anche in Scozia e nell’Isola di Man. E’ collegata con le pietre e la conformazione rocciosa del paesaggio -in particolare le scogliere- e con i tumuli funerari a pietra.
Nelle aisling song l’Irlanda viene rappresentata come una fanciulla dalle sembianze di dea, ma già nel canto settecentesco Caitilín Ní Uallacháin l’Irlanda è paragonata a una  “povera vecchia” (la Sean-Bhean bhocht) la signora Katty Hualloghan – Cathleen o Kathleen Nì Houlihan-,  padrona di quattro campi verdi (cioè le quattro province in cui è divisa per tradizione l’Irlanda).  Il nome è anche il titolo di una opera teatrale di W.B. Yeats e Lady Augusta Gregory ambientata nel 1798.

 

RÓISÍN DUBH

CAITILIN NI UALLACHAIN

FONTI
https://www.theballadeers.com/ire/oriad_m2006_mise.htm
http://www.ilcerchiodellaluna.it/central_Dee_Cailleach.htm
https://aliisaacstoryteller.com/2017/06/12/who-was-the-old-woman-of-beare/
http://www.lasoffittadellestreghe.it/shoponline/cailleach-dea-dellinverno/
http://ifi.ie/film/mise-eire/
http://www.itastreaming.online/film/19383-mise-%C3%89ire-1959-streaming-subita.html
http://www.irishpage.com/poems/miseeire.htm
https://quinteparallele.net/2017/03/20/ceol-na-heireann-musiche-classiche-dirlanda-in-sean-o-riada/

Outlander: Baroque Boogie Woogie

Read the post in English

DAL LIBRO LA STRANIERA

Diana Gabaldon

Nel primo libro della saga Outlander scritto da Diana Gabaldon il capitolo 34 è dedicato alla ricerca dello scomparso Jamie e Claire si accompagna al  fedele e inossidabile Roger Murtaugh. Improvvisandosi imbonitori (nel tentativo di attrarre l’attenzione di Jamie affinchè si metta in contatto con loro) i due si esibiscono nelle taverne e nelle fiere con Murtaugh come principale intrattenitore e Claire che lo accompagna nel canto, arrangiandosi anche come chiromante. La canzone che è menzionata nel libro è la ballata del Border “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow“.

OUTLANDER TV: “The Search”

Claire Fraser (Caitriona Balfe) in “The Search.”, travestita da uomo

Nell’episodio 14 “The Search” della serie televisiva Outlander (prima stagione) Murtaugh ( interpretato dall’attore Danny Glover) è invece un ballerino un po’ maldestro e Claire non proprio versata per il canto, ma neanche stonata, spera di vivacizzare l’esibizione di un danzatore appena passabile, canticchiando un boogie woogie molto popolare ai suoi tempi, il 1945; il motivetto piace subito a Murtaugh  (nonostante il divario culturale tra la musica popolare d’epoca barocca e la musica popolare del XX secolo) ma le consiglia di abbinarlo ad un testo più da bawdy song che il pubblico del 1743 saprà meglio apprezzare: “The Reels o’ Bogie”


I
Here’s to all you lads and lasses
That go out this way.
Be sure to tip your coggie
When you take her out to play
Lads and lasses toy a kiss,
The lads never think
What they do is amiss
Chorus
Because there’s Kent and keen
And there’s Aberdeen
And there’s naan as muckle
as the Strath of boogie-woogie
II
For every lad’ll wander
Just to have his lass
An’ when they see her pintle rise,
They’ll raise a glass
And rowe about their wanton een
They dance a reel as the troopers
Go over the lea
Chorus
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
He giggled, goggled me
He was a banger
He sought the prize between my thighs
Became a hanger
Chorus
And no there’s naan as muckle
As the wanton tune
Of strath of boogie
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Per tutti voi dame e messeri
che andate per questa via
Ricordatevi di bere un sorso (1)
quando state in compagnia (2)
uomini e donne si scambiano un bacio, ma gli uomini non pensano mai
che quello che fanno è scorretto
Coro
Perché dal Kent al Border(3)
e fino all’Aberdeen
non c’è una valle ampia (4)
come 
la valle del boogie (5) woogie
II
Perché ogni uomo andrà in giro
solo per trovare una donna
e quando lei si concederà (6)
alzeranno il calice
e gettando occhiate (7) lascive
danzeranno un reel (8) mentre  le truppe ricontrollano i pascoli (9)
Chorus
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
Ridacchiava, mi faceva gli occhi dolci
era il membro di una banda (10).
e cercando il premio tra le mie cosce
si trasformava in uno spadino (11)
Coro
Non c’è una valle ampia
come la melodia spericolata
della valle del boogie

NOTE
1) doppio senso: coggie (vezzeggiativo) o cog è la scodella, ciotola di legno per bere. Una tipica tazza scozzese cerimoniale con due manici detta quaich (quaigh o quoich), tradizionalmente realizzate in legno, con fasce come quelle di una botte tenute insieme da un cerchio di salice o d’argento; oggi sono in gran parte d’argento. Uno vero scozzese, per salutarvi, vi offrirà l’ultimo sorso di whisky in un quaich, per
simboleggiare la vostra amicizia.
2) il play è chiaramente un “gioco” erotico
3) “Kent and keen” Kent è una contea nella parte sud-est dell’Inghilterra, dove si trovano le bianche scogliere di Dover quindi il punto (per i viaggiatori dal continente) più a sud: in senso lato vuol dire “Dal Sud al Nord” keen non è una contea e nemmeno un  villaggio, forse un vecchio termine per il Border, potrebbere essere usato come assonanza e stare per “dal  Kent dal forte vento” o qualcosa del genere
4) strath è una  valle fluviale che è ampia e poco profonda (al contrario del glen una vallata tipicamente più stretta e profonda).
5) il “Bogie” è un torrente nell’Aberdeenshire, che attraversa la bella valle o strath del Bogie.  Strathbogie però è anche il nome di una cittadina nella contea dell’Aberdeenshire detta Milton of Strathbogie
6) ancora un doppio senso pintle è il piolo di un cardine, o un bullone
7) een  sta per “even”= Evening letteralmente “rotolandosi senza inibizioni nella notte; oppure een è il prurale di “eye” “to roll one’s eyes” roteare gli occhi , la frase diventa “roteando gli occhi maliziosi, lascivi”
8) to dance a reel è ancora un doppio senso il reel è una tipica melodia da danza in cui i ballerini eseguono giravolte e descrivono intrecci.
9) le giubbe rosse vanno a pattugliare le highlands in cerca di ribelli o facinorosi. Il riferimento è calzante con la situazione della narrazione
10) nello slang americano sta per  gangbanger =  membro di una banda di tipacci
ma nel 1700 è uno che canta a voce alta (banda musicale)
11) doppio senso

Murtaugh  con movenze un po’ orsine balla sulle spade incrociate a tempo di Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Of Company B

LA REALTA’ STORICA

“The Reels o’ Bogie” è una canzoncina ricca di doppi sensi del 1700 dalle molte versioni (se ne contano 5) tra le quali una attribuita al Duca Alexander Gordon su musica arrangiata da J. Haydn ancora cantata nei salotti lirici.

Hob. XXXIa no. 55, JHW. XXXII/1 no. 55 in “Haydn: Scottish and Welsh Songs”, Vol. 1, 2009 (ascolta su Spotify).


I
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Stra’bogie,
Gin I hae but a bonny lass,
Ye’re welcome to your cogie.
And ye may sit up a’ the night,
And drink till it be braid daylight;
Gie me a lass baith clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
John Bull in countra dances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Mynheer an all’mand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome maist dance wound’rous light;
But twasome ding a’ out o’ sight,
Danc’d to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now a’ the lads ha’e done their best,
Like true men of Stra’bogie;
We’ll stop a while and tak a rest,
And tipple out a cogie;
Come now, my lads, and tak your glass,
And try ilk other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Abbiamo zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
e se c’è una bella ragazza
che sia la benvenuta al brindisi!
Ti puoi sedere per tutta la notte
e bere finchè spunterà la luce del giorno: datemi un ragazza fresca e soda, per ballare il Reel del Bogie.
II
Nel Cotillon i Francesi eccellono,
gli Inglesi nella Contraddanza;
gli Spagnoli danzano bene il Fandango, i Tedeschi il ballo alemanno,
gli Scozzesi si dilettano nel reel a quattro (quadriglia), il trio
ballerà in modo mirabile
ma la coppia andrà a nascondersi
per ballare il Reel del Bogie.
III
Ora che tutti i signori hanno fatto del loro meglio, come veri uomini di Strathbogie, ci fermeremo un po’ per riposarci, e bere un sorso.
Venite signori, e prendete il bicchiere e cercate di superare tutti gli altri nel bere alla salute di ogni ragazza che danza il Reel del Bogie

Lo stesso Robert Burns ne riarrangia una con il titolo “There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen” allungando con versi di suo pugno (i primo tre) la versione tradizionale riportata  da David Herd nel suo “Scots Songs” (1776, vol II).

ASCOLTA Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns Vol 1 & 2, 1996 su Spotify. La versione di Ewan McColl ricalca sostanzialmente quella di Jean.


I
Cauld kail (1)  in Aberdeen
And castocks (2)  in Strabogie
But yet I fear they’ll cook o’er soon,
And never warm the coggie (3).
II
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-gir’d cap (4)
For e’er a quine (5) on Bogie.
III
There’s Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him o’ his coggie,
If she were mine, upon my life
I wad douk her in a Bogie.
IV
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-girr’d cap
For e’er a quine on Bogie
V
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Strabogie;
When ilka lad maun hae his lass,
Then fye, gie me my coggie.
VI
The lasses about Bogie gicht (6)
Their limbs, they are sae clean and tight (7),
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie (8).
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
Sae young a maid to woo, Sir (9)?
I’m sure it was nae joke to her,
Whate’er it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses  (10) now are nae sae blate
But they ken auld folk’s out o’ date,
And better playfare can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
temo che cucineranno velocemente senza riscaldare la scodella.
II
La mia scodella, signori, la mia scodella
non voglio altro che la mia scodella: darei la mia scodella con tre manici, di continuo, a una servetta sul Bogie
III
Johnie Smith ha una moglie
che lesina sulla sua razione (di zuppa),
se fosse la mia, giuro
che la getterei nel Bogie
IV
La mia scodella, signori, la mia scodella
non voglio altro che la mia scodella: darei la mia scodella con tre manici, di continuo, a una servetta sul Bogie
V
Zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
ogni uomo deve avere la sua amica,
allora sbrigati, dammi la mia scodella.
VI
Le ragazze di Bogingicht
braccia e gambe, sono così fresche e sode (strette)
che non appena le stringi per bene
ballano il reel del Bogie.
VII
Signore di  Aberdeen, cosa vi era preso ad amoreggiare con una così giovane servetta? Di certo non era una facezia per lei, qualunque cosa fosse per voi.
VIII
Perchè le ragazze oggi non sono così timide e sanno come ottenere giocattoli migliori che i vecchi superati  gambi di cavolo nella valle del Bogie (a Strathbogie).

NOTE
1) Kail o kale è una varietà di cavolo cucinato in Inghilterra nella zuppa, forse un tempo aveva il significato di pietanza appetitosa,  ‘castocks’ sono i gambi del cavolo. Ma i doppi sensi si sprecano. La pietanza riscaldata non è poi così gustosa come sembra!
2) Strathbogie potrebbe essere  sia la valle del Bogie ma anche la cittadina Milton of Strathbogie (oggi Huntly) dimora storica del reggimento di Gordon Highlanders, tradizionalmente reclutato in tutto il nord-est della Scozia.
3) coggie è la tazza o scodella, per  sorbire la zuppa o mangiare il porridge. Il senso è “finiranno presto e riscalderanno appena la zuppa” e chi ha orecchie per intendere, intenda
4) Cap (cup) ha lo stesso significato di cog e infatti in alcune versioni è scritto three-girr’d cog (coggie);  three-girred = surrounded with three hoops, three-ringed cup
5) quine è un termine arcaico per donna, ma ha diversi significati può voler dire moglie oppure figlia,  indicare una servetta o ancora essere usato in termini dispregiativi
6) se considerata una parola divisa gicht=saucy; ma scritto anche come Bogingicht; Bog of Gight o Bogengight era l’antica designazione della sede della damiglia ducale di Seton-Gordon, oggi Gordon Castle
7) letteralmente pulite e strette
8) doppio senso
9) si mette in ridicolo un vecchio (forse il Lord di quelle terre) che si ostina a corteggiare le giovani ragazze!
10) sottointeso le ragazze di Bogingicht

E ovviamente c’è anche una scottish country dance con il titolo Cauld Kail in Aberdeen!!

E un reel irlandese dallo stesso titolo!

FONTI
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/scotlands-burns-and-outlander-rival-shakespeares-bawdy/
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/adapted-bawdy-lyrics-outlander-tv-series-episode-114-the-search/
http://www.outlandercast.com/2016/01/top-ten-musical-moments-of-season-1.html

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Cauld_Kail_in_Aberdeen_1
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-162,-page-170-cauld-kail-in-aberdeen.aspx
http://www.bartleby.com/333/222.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=92760

http://www.rscds-swws.org/news/200707/vol24-1.htm

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/cauld-kail.html
https://eatthetable.com/2014/04/30/147/
https://biblio.wiki/wiki/Songs_of_Robert_Burns/There%27s_cauld_kail_in_Aberdeen

https://thesession.org/tunes/3307
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/cauldkai.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(1)_(The)
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(2)

Outlander: Baroque Boogie Woogie

Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

Diana Gabaldon

In the first book of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon, chapter 34 is dedicated to the search for her missing Jamie and Claire is going along with the faithful and stainless Roger Murtaugh. Acting as barkers (hoping Jamie to get in touch with them) they perform in taverns and fairs with Murtaugh as the main entertainer and Claire as choir, and if necessary, fortune teller. The song that is mentioned in the book is the Border ballad “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow“.

OUTLANDER TV: “The Search”

Murtaugh (Danny Glover) is on the contrary, a rather clumsy dancer and Claire is not really versed for singing, but nor out of tune, so she hopes to liven up the performance of a barely passable dancer, humming a very popular boogie woogie in her day, 1945; Murtagh immediately likes the silly tune (despite the cultural divide between popular baroque music and 20th century folk music) but he suggests to fit a more bawdy song text that the 1743 audience will know better: “The Reels o’ Bogie”

Caitriona Balfe as Claire Fraser in “The Search.” Image credit Sony Pictures Television

Claire: May I make a suggestion? Perhaps you could sing a song to jazz up the dance a bit.
Murtaugh: Jazz?
C: To spice up, enliven.
M: A song?
C: Yes, something toe-tapping like…
♪ He was a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way ♪
♪ He had a boogie style that no one else could play ♪
♪ He was a top man at his craft ♪
♪ But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft ♪
♪ He’s in the army now a-blowin’ reveille ♪
♪ He’s the boogie-woogie bugle boy of company b ♪
M:  It’s a Bonnie tune, but you need a Scottish song. And a new look. That’s jazzed you up a bit, eh?
(http://transcripts.foreverdreaming.org/viewtopic.php?f=198&t=18201)

Claire performance of a traditional bawdy Scots song “The Reels o’ Bogie” to the tune of “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.”


I
Here’s to all you lads and lasses
That go out this way.
Be sure to tip your coggie (1)
When you take her out to play (2)
Lads and lasses toy a kiss,
The lads never think
What they do is amiss
Chorus:
Because there’s Kent and keen (3)
And there’s Aberdeen
And there’s naan as muckle
as the Strath of boogie (4)-woogie
II
For every lad’ll wander
Just to have his lass
An’ when they see her pintle (5) rise,
They’ll raise a glass
And rowe about their wanton een (6)
They dance a reel (7) as the troopers
Go over the lea

[Chorus]
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
He giggled, goggled me
He was a banger (8)
He sought the prize
between my thighs
Became a hanger (9)
[Chorus]
And no there’s naan as muckle
As the wanton tune
Of strath of boogie

NOTES
1) a sexual metaphor: coggie – n., diminutive of “cog,” meaning cup, or wooden bowl to drink. 
 A typical ceremonial Scottish cup with two handles called quaich (quaigh or quoich), traditionally made of wood, with bands like those of a barrel held together by a circle of willow or silver; today they are largely silver.
2) erotic play
3) “Kent and keen” Kent is a county in the southeastern part of England, where the white cliffs of Dover are located so the point (for travelers from the mainland) further south; “keen” is not a county and not even a village, maybe an old term for the Border
4) Strathbogie: or Milton of Strathbogie the old name of Huntly, Scotland. A strath is a large valley, typically a river valley that is wide and shallow (as opposed to a glen which is typically narrower and deep. So it’s a sexual metaphor: its wideness and openness, is lasciviousness or moral looseness. The “Bogie,” also known as the Water of Bogie is a stream in Aberdeenshire, which runs through the beautiful strath or valley called Strathbogie
5) pintle – n., “a pin or bolt, especially one on whichsomething turns, as the gudgeon of a hinge.” – Dictionary.com. Metaphor for penis.
6) een= eyes, “to roll one’s eyes” 
7) to dance a reel: dance the miller’s reel / dance the reels of Stumpie , obsolete phrase referring to sexual intercourse; reel: a type of dance, associated with weaving and spinning, emphasizing this kind of pattern and movement
8) american slang = gangbanger , but in 700’s one’s sing very loudly  (musical group)
9) hanger=a man with a long penis 

The swords dance of Murtaugh and Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Of Company B’s tune

THE HISTORICAL REALITY

We know five different versions dating to the 18th century of “The Reels o ‘Bogie” (aka “Cauld Kale in Aberdeen”) among which one attributed to Duke Alexander Gordon with music arranged by J. Haydn is still sung in the lyrical world
Hob. XXXIa no. 55, JHW. XXXII/1 no. 55 in “Haydn: Scottish and Welsh Songs”, Vol. 1, 2009 (su Spotify)

THE REELS O ‘BOGIE
I
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Stra’bogie,
Gin I hae but a bonny lass,
Ye’re welcome to your cogie.
And ye may sit up a’ the night,
And drink till it be braid daylight;
Gie me a lass baith clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
John Bull in countra dances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Mynheer an all’mand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome maist dance wound’rous light;
But twasome ding a’ out o’ sight,
Danc’d to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now a’ the lads ha’e done their best,
Like true men of Stra’bogie;
We’ll stop a while and tak a rest,
And tipple out a cogie;
Come now, my lads, and tak your glass,
And try ilk other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,

if I have but a fair lady
you are welcome to your cup.
And you may sit up all the night,
and drink till it be broad daylight;
Give me a lass both clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
the English in countrydances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Dutch an allemand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome may dance wounderous light;
But twasome ding all out of sight,
Danced to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now all the lads have done their best,
Like true men of Strathbogie,
We’ll stop a while and take a rest,
And tipple out a cup;
Come now, my lads, and take your glass,/And try every other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.

One version dates from David Herd’s Scots Songs, 1769 and Robert Burns re-worked his version several times for George Thomson’s Select Collection of Scottish Airs, 1793. He liberally combined Herd’s version with his own.
Jean Redpath in “Songs of Robert Burns” Vol 1 & 2, 1996 (Spotify)


I
Cauld kail (1)  in Aberdeen
And castocks  in Strabogie
But yet I fear they’ll cook o’er soon,
And never warm the coggie.
II
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-gir’d cap (2)
For e’er a quine (3) on Bogie.
III
There’s Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him o’ his coggie,
If she were mine, upon my life
I wad douk her in a Bogie.
IV
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-girr’d cap
For e’er a quine on Bogie
V
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Strabogie;
When ilka lad maun hae his lass,
Then fye, gie me my coggie.
VI
The lasses about Bogie gicht (4)
Their limbs, they are sae clean and tight,
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie.
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
Sae young a maid to woo, Sir (5)?
I’m sure it was nae joke to her,
Whate’er it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses  now are nae sae blate
But they ken auld folk’s out o’ date,
And better playfare can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,
But yet I fear they’ll cook over soon
And never warm my wooden cup.
II
My cup, Sirs, my cup, Sirs,
I cannot want my cup:
I would not give my three-ringed cup,
For ever a maid on Bogie.
III
There is Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him of his cup,
If she were mine, upon my life
I would duck her in a bog.
IV
My cup, Sirs, my cup, Sirs,
I cannot want my cup:
I would not give my three-ringed cup,
For ever a young girl on Bogie
V
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,
When every lad must have his girl-friend,
Then fye, give me my cup.
VI
The lasses about Bogingicht
Their limbs, they are so clean and tight,
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie.
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
So young a maid to woo, Sir?
I’m sure it was no joke to her,
Whatever it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses now are no so timid
But they know old folk’s out of date,
And playthings can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.

NOTES
1) ‘Kail’ or ‘kale’ is a type of cabbage. It grows on a stalk, has large crinkly leaves and is of the cabbage family. Kail is usually used in broth, and often a vegetable soup containing kail was called kail-broth, or simply ‘kail’. Cold kail would be such a broth that had cooled and lost its savour. Hence the familiar Scottish saying with reference to the restoration of old ideas or practices that had seen their day — ‘cauld kail het again’ (cold kail reheated!).”
2) Cap (cup)= cog also “three-girr’d cog (coggie);  three-girred = surrounded with three hoops, three-ringed cup
3) quine
4)  gicht=saucy; or Bogingicht; Bog of Gight, or Bogengight, was the ancient designation of the seat of the ducal family of Seton-Gordon. It is now termed Gordon Castle
5) he ridicules an old man (perhaps the Lord of those lands) who persists in wooing a young lass!
“From the language, the authorship may be safely assigned to an Aberdonian, we suspect the song refers to the first Earl of Aberdeen, who died 20th April 1720, in the eighty third year of his age.  As the name is specially given, there cannot be much difficulty in identifying the hero with the Sir George Gordon of Haddo, born 3rd October 1637, who was Lord Chancellor of Scotland from 1682 to 1684, and who was created Earl of Aberdeen … 1682, to him and the heirs-male of his body..
Lord Lewis Gordon … in the ’45 … declared for Prince Charles…. When all the Pretender’s hopes were blasted at Culloden … [he] fled to France, where he died in 1754. One of his sisters, a young lady of great beauty, became the third wife of William Earl of Aberdeen, which gave rise to the following lines in the well-known song of ‘Cauld Kail in Aberdeen, and Custocks in Strathbogie [VII an VIII verses]” (source: Fraser’s Magazine (London, 18668 (“Digitized by Google”)), Vol. LXXIII, p. 575).

And here is the scottish country dance “Cauld Kail in Aberdeen”!!

“The Reel of Bogie” is also claimed and played as an Irish folk song.

LINK
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/scotlands-burns-and-outlander-rival-shakespeares-bawdy/
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/adapted-bawdy-lyrics-outlander-tv-series-episode-114-the-search/
http://www.outlandercast.com/2016/01/top-ten-musical-moments-of-season-1.html

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Cauld_Kail_in_Aberdeen_1
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-162,-page-170-cauld-kail-in-aberdeen.aspx
http://www.bartleby.com/333/222.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=92760

http://www.rscds-swws.org/news/200707/vol24-1.htm

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/cauld-kail.html
https://eatthetable.com/2014/04/30/147/
https://biblio.wiki/wiki/Songs_of_Robert_Burns/There%27s_cauld_kail_in_Aberdeen

https://thesession.org/tunes/3307
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/cauldkai.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(1)_(The)
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(2)