Archivi categoria: Drinking song/ CANTI DA OSTERIA

Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

Leggi in Italiano

Entitled “Jolly Roving Tar” but more frequently “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” here is a forebitter song that ironizes on the idle occupations of a sailor when he is ashore.
For my money’s gone,” says the sailor who is well liked and fondled by the ladies when his pockets are full, but immediately put aside for another sailor when the money ends!

A similar song (we do not know if original or a traditional version rewriting) was written in New York in 1885 by Ed Harrigan & David Braham for the music hall entitled ‘Old Lavender‘ (text and score here); a version published by John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” was attributed to John Thomas, a Welsh sailor who was on “the Philadelphian” in 1896. (text here), but the main source of the best known variant comes from “Grammy” Fish .

“GRAMMY” FISH

Mrs. Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) spent the first 24 years of her life in Black Brook, NY, not far from the Canadian border. Lena’s main source of songs was her own family, the Bourne; his ancestors were the first settlers of Cape Cod and a lot of songs (with many English and Irish traditional tunes) had passed to the family generations since emigration . As a lumber trader, her father  collected many songs from the people he met in the New England woods in his travels.
Once married, Lena moved to Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Two collectors of traditional songs (Helen Harkness Flanders and Marguerite Olney) interviewed her in 1940 and recorded about 175 songs; the following year Anne and Frank Warner collected a hundred songs in four recording sessions half of which completly new ones.
“Grammy” Fish had taken her role as a witness of the past to heart so as to transcribe the “old songs” in many notebooks to leave them to the new generations.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live

I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…

NOTES
1) grog= drink
2) Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  or “He then will sail aboard some ship
4)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes. (the eight bells were ringed at 4, at 8, at 12, at 16, at 20 and at midnight). An hourglass was used to calculate the time.

Great Big Sea from Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.

I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!

NOTES
3) meaning that he will not offend the innkeeper with a refusal
4) Placentia is a small Canadian city formed by the union of the villages of Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville and Argentia .
5)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes.

ENGLISH VERSION

In the nineteenth century there was a completely different version in which poor Susan was distraught because the fine William was still far from the sea, she decided to follow him as a sailor. The version is still popular in Newfoundland. As much as I searched the web at the moment I did not find a video to listen to.
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

Jolly Roving Tar by “Irish Rovers”

The text was written by George Millar the founder of the “Irish Rovers” and although a different song borrows some phrases from “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” other equally famous sea songs on sailors.
The Irish Rover from Another Round 2005: various dances taken from fantasy films and animations

I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

All for me Grog

Leggi in italiano

Yet another drinking song, “All for me Grog”, in which “Grog” is a drink based on rum, but also a colloquial term used in Ireland as a synonym for “drinking”.
grogThe song opens with the refrain, in which our wandering sailor specifies that it is precisely because of his love for alcohol, tobacco and girls, that he always finds himself penniless and full of trouble. To satisfy his own vices, johnny sells from his boots to his bed. More than a sea shanty it was a forebitter song or a tavern song; and our johnny could very well be enlisted in the Royal Navy, but also been boarded a pirate ship around the West Indies.

Nowadays it is a song that is depopulated in historical reenactments with corollaries of pirate chorus!
Al Lloyd (II, I, III)

The Dubliners from The Dubliners Live,1974

AC4 Black Flag ( II, III, VI)

 CHORUS
And it’s all for me grog
me jolly, jolly grog (1)
All for my beer and tobacco
Well, I spent all me tin
with the lassies (2) drinkin’ gin
Far across the Western Ocean
I must wander

I
I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since first I came ashore with me plunder
I’ve seen centipedes and snakes and me head is full of aches
And I have to take a path for way out yonder (3)
II
Where are me boots,
me noggin’ (4), noggin’ boots
They’re all sold (gone) for beer and tobacco
See the soles they were thin
and the uppers were lettin’ in(5)
And the heels were lookin’ out for better weather

III
Where is me shirt,
me noggin’, noggin’ shirt
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see the sleeves were all worn out and the collar been torn about
And the tail was lookin’ out for better weather
IV
Where is me wife,
me noggin’, noggin’ wife
She’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see her front it was worn out
and her tail I kicked about
And I’m sure she’s lookin’ out for better weather
V
Where is me bed,
me  noggin’, noggin’ bed
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see I sold it to the girls until the springs were all in twirls(6)
And the sheets they’re lookin’ out for better weather
VI
Well I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since I’ve been ashore for me slumber
Well I spent all me dough
On the lassies don’t ye know
Across the western ocean(7)
I will wander.

NOTES
1) grog: it is a very old term and means “liqueur” or “alcoholic beverage”. The grog is a drink introduced in the Royal Navy in 1740: rum after the British conquest of Jamaica had become the favorite drink of sailors, but to avoid any problems during navigation, the daily ration of rum was diluted with water.
2) lassies: widely used in Scotland, it is the plural of lassie or lassy, diminutive of lass, the archaic form for “lady”
4) nogging: in the standard English noun, the word means “head”, “pumpkin”, in an ironic sense. Being a colloquial expression, it becomes “stubborn” (qualifying adjective)
5) let in = open
6) the use of the mattress is implied not only for sleeping
7) western ocean: it is the term by which the sailors of the time referred to the Atlantic Ocean

A GROG JUG

1/4 or 1/3 of Jamaican rum
half lemon juice (or orange or grapefruit)
1 or 2 teaspoons of brown sugar.
Fill with water.

Even in the warm winter version: the water must be heated almost to boiling. Add a little spice (cinnamon stick, cloves) and lemon zest.
It is a classic Christmas drink especially in Northern Europe.

 GROG

( Italo Ottonello)
The grog was a mixture of rum and water, later flavored with lemon juice, as an anti-scorb, and a little sugar. The adoption of the grog is due to Admiral Edward Vernon, to remedy the disciplinary problems created by an excessive ration of alcohol (*) on British warships. On 21 August 1740 he issued for his team an order that established the distribution of rum lengthened with water. The ration was obtained by mixing a quarter of gallon of water (liters 1.13) and a half pint of rum (0.28 liters) – in proportion 4 to 1 – and distributed half at noon and half in the evening. The term grog comes from ‘Old Grog’, the nickname of the Admiral, who used to wear trousers and a cloak of thick grogram fabric at sea. The use of grog, later, became common in Anglo-Saxon marines, and the deprivation of the ration (grog stop), was one of the most feared punishment by sailors. Temperance ships were called those merchant ships whose enlistment contract contained the “no spirits allowed” clause which excluded the distribution of grog or other alcohol to the crew.
 (*) The water, not always good already at the beginning of the journey, became rotten only after a few days of stay in the barrels.
In fact, nobody drank it because beer was available. It was light beer, of poor quality, which ended within a month and, only then, the captains allowed the distribution of wine or liqueurs. A pint of wine (just over half a liter) or half a pint of rum was considered the equivalent of a gallon (4.5 liters) of beer, the daily ration. It seems that the sailors preferred the white wines to the red ones that they called despicably black-strap (molasses). Being destined in the Mediterranean, where wine was embarked, was said to be blackstrapped. In the West Indies, however, rum was abundant.

LINK
http://www.drinkingcup.net/navy-rum-part-2-dogs-tankys-scuttlebutts-fanny-cups/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5512
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/allformegrog.html
http://www.lettereearti.it/mondodellarte/musica/la-lingua-delle-ballate-e-delle-canzoni-popolari-anglo-irlandesi/

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Love is pleasing

“Love is pleasing” ma anche “Love is teasing” è una canzone tradizionale diffusa nelle isole britanniche e nel nord-america che era di moda nei folk club degli anni 60-70. Gli studiosi ritengono che i versi siano parte di una serie di “frasi fatte” provenienti dal grande calderone delle ballate tradizionali, così svincolati da una narrazione esprimono comunque un sentimento, quello dell’amore tradito (o dell’amore incostante).
The words of “Love is Teasing” resemble those found in three similar songs, “O Waly, Waly,” “The Water is Wide,” and “Down in the Meadows” and all of these can be traced back to the ballad “Jamie Douglas” (Child 204). In “Jamie Douglas,” a bride has been falsely accused of infidelity and is sent back to her father with an aching heart. All of the shorter songs have whittled away the narrative over time leaving nothing but an emotional core. Various versions journeyed back and forth between Ireland, Britain, and North America, and singers often augment whatever verses they have learned with others from a common stock of associated “floating” verses. (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE AMERICANA

ASCOLTA Jean Ritchie imparò la canzone nel 1946 da Peggy Staunton,  irlandese emigrata a New York

ASCOLTA Rhiannon Giddens in Tomorrow Is My Turn, 2015 che così scrive nelle note “I first heard Peggy Seeger sing this and immediately fell in love with it – as I found earlier recordings I got caught by Jean Ritchie’s version, with her idiosyncratic and hypnotic dulcimer playing. This is the ancient warning from woman to woman about the perfidies of man.


I
Love is teasing, love is pleasing
And love’s a pleasure when first it is new
But as love grows older it still grows colder
And fades away like the morning dew
II
Come all you fair maids, now take a warning
Don’t ever heed what a young man say
He’s like a star on some foggy morning When you think he’s near he is far away
III
I left my father, I left my mother
I left my brothers and sisters too
I left my home and kind relations
I left them all just to follow you.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’amore è un tormento, l’amore è un piacere e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo,
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
II
Venite tutte qui ragazze, e prendete il mio avvertimento: non date mai retta a quello che un giovanotto dice,  lui è come la stella in un mattino nebbioso, quando lo credete vicino, si è allontanato
III
Lasciai mio padre, lasciai mia madre
lasciai le mie sorelle e anche i miei fratelli
lasciai tutti gli amici e la mia fede
li lasciai tutti per seguirti

VERSIONE EMIGRATION SONG

Pur nella standardizzazione del genere il canto si suddivide in due filoni, nel primo una donna (ma anche un uomo) con il cuore a pezzi, rimasta senza punto di riferimento, sceglie di emigrare per l’America.
ASCOLTA The Dubliners

ASCOLTA Marianne Faithfull & Chieftains live


I
I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
I wish I was a youth again
But a youth again I can never be
Till apples grow
on an ivy tree
II
I left me father, I left me mother
I left all my sisters
and brothers too
I left all my friends and me own religion
I left them all for to follow you
III
But the sweetest apple is the soonest rotten
And the hottest love is the soonest cold
And what can’t be cured love
has to be endured love (1)
And now I am bound for America
IV
Oh love is pleasin’ and love is teasin’
And love is a pleasure when first it’s new
But as it grows older sure the love grows colder
And it fades away like the morning dew
V
And love and porter makes a young man older
And love and whiskey makes him old and grey
And what can’t be cured love has to be endured love
And now I am bound for America
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei, vorrei, vorrei ma non posso
vorrei essere di nuovo giovane
ma non potrò mai essere di nuovo giovane finchè le mele cresceranno sull’edera
II
Lasciai mio padre, lasciai mia madre
lasciai le mie sorelle e anche i miei fratelli
lasciai tutti gli amici e la mia fede
li lasciai tutti per seguirti
III
Ma la mela più dolce è quella che per prima marcisce e l’amore più appassionato è il primo che si raffredda, e quello ciò che non può guarire dall’amore, deve essere rafforzato dall’amore e ora sono in partenza per l’America
IV
L’amore è un piacere e l’amore è un tormento e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
V
Amore e birra fanno di un giovane un uomo
e amore e whiskey lo fanno invecchiare e incanutire
e quello ciò che non può guarire dall’amore, deve essere rafforzato dall’amore e ora sono in partena per l’America

NOTA
1) letteralmente: e quello che non può essere amore curato deve essere amore sopportato
VERSIONE DRINKING SONG
La seconda verisone è un lamento più tipicamente femminile.
ASCOLTA Karan Casey live


I
I never thought my love would leave me
Until that morning when he stepped in
Well, he sat down and I sat beside him
And then our troubles, they did begin
II
Oh love is teasing and love is pleasing
And love is a pleasure when first it’s new
But love grows older and love grows colder
And it fades away like the morning dew
III
There is an alehous in yon town
And it’s there my love goes and he sits down
He takes a strange girl (1) upon his knee
And he tells to her what he once told to me
IV
I wish my father had never whistled(2)
And I wish my mother had never sung
I wish the cradle had never rocked me
And I wish my life, it had not begun
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avrei mai creduto che il mio amore mi avrebbe lasciata
fino a quel mattino quando entrò
beh si sedette e io mi misi accanto a lui
e allora i nostri guai iniziarono.
II
L’amore è un piacere e l’amore è un tormento e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo,
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
III
C’è una birreria in quella città
ed è dove il mio amore va a sedersi,
si prende una puttana sulle ginocchia
e le dice ciò che un tempo diceva a me
IV
Vorrei che mio padre non avesse mai suonato il flauto
e che mia mamma non avesse mai cantato
vorrei che la culla non mi avesse mai cullato
e che la mia vita non fosse mai cominciata

NOTE
1) stange girl non è solo una ragazza strana ma un eufemismo per prostituta
2) i genitori hanno fatto sesso

FONTI
https://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/love-is-teasing
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=9734
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/l/loveteas.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/loveisteasing.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/love.htm

THREE DRUNKEN MAIDENS

Un classico delle rievocazioni storiche in tema Bucanieri questa allegra drinking song, risalente alla metà del 1700: il titolo è anche semplicemente “Drunken Maidens” e le fanciulle sono talvolta “Three drunken maidens” ma anche “Four drunken maidens”.
A.L. Lloyd associò una melodia di sua composizione al testo che aveva trovato in “A Pedlar Pack of Ballads and Songs” di W H. Logan’s  (1869) e registrò la canzone, accompagnato da Al Jeffery al banjo,  nel suo album “English Drinking Songs” (1956) , che ebbe un discreto seguito nei circuiti dei folk clubs.
In seguito Lloyd trovò nel “Tune Book” (1770) di John Vickers la melodia originaria che accompagnava la canzone,  ma orami la versione standard era diventata la sua.
La canzone viene associata a Christy Moore e considerata una irish driinking song, ma è stata eseguita anche dai Fairport Convention e gli Steeleye Span.

ASCOLTA A.L. Lloyd in All For Me Grog, 1961

ASCOLTA The Planxty live

ASCOLTA Denis Murray & Napper Tandy live 1997


I
There were three drunken maidens
Come from the Isle of Wight (1)
They drunk from Monday morning
Nor stopped till Saturday night
When Saturday night would come, me boys
They wouldn’t then go out
Not them three drunken maidens,
they pushed the jug about (2).
II
Then in comes bouncing Sally
Her cheeks as red as blooms
“Move up me jolly sisters
And give young Sally some room
Then I will be your equal
Before the night is out”
And these four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
III
There’s woodcock and pheasant
There’s partridge and hare
There’s all sorts of dainties
No scarcity was there
There’s forty quarts of beer, me boys
They fairly drunk them out
And these four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
IV
And up comes the landlord
He’s asking for his pay
“It is a forty pound bill, me boys
These gobs have got to pay
That’s ten pounds apiece, me boys”
But still they wouldn’t go out
These four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
V
Oh where are your feather hats
Your mantles rich and fine?
They all got swallowed up, me lads
In tankards of good wine
And where are your maidenheads
You maidens frisk and gay?
We left them in the alehouse
We drank them clean away(3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre signorine ubriache
che veniva dall’Isola di Wright
bevevano dal lunedì mattino
e non smettevano fino alla notte del sabato.
Quando arrivava sabato notte, ragazzi,
non avrebbero poi voluto uscire
non queste tre fanciulle ubriache
che facevano girare la bottiglia!
II
Allora entrò la rotondetta Sally
dalle guance come rose fiorite
“Spostatevi, mie allegre sorelle
e fate un po’ di posto alla piccola Sally
allora sarò vostra pari
prima che la notte sia finita”
Così queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
III
C’erano la beccaccia e il fagiano
c’erano la pernice e la lepre
e di tutte le prelibatezze
non c’era penuria.
C’erano quaranta litri di birra, ragazzi
e li bevvero tutti equamente
e queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
IV
Ed ecco che arriva l’oste
e chiede di essere pagato
“E’ un conto di 40 sterline, ragazzi
dovete pagare questo gruzzolo,
sono dieci sterline a testa, ragazzi”
Eppure non volevano andarsene
queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
V
Dove sono i vostri cappelli piumati
i mantelli preziosi e belli?
“Sono stati tutti inghiottiti, ragazzi
in boccali di buon vino.”
E dove sono le vostre verginità
voi fanciulle sveglie e allegre?
“Le lasciammo in birreria,
ce le siamo bevute”

NOTE
1) l’isola di Wight era un deposito per i contrabbandieri di liquori provenienti dalla Francia
2) Non è automatico tradurre in italiano il temine jug: in fiorentino si direbbe boccia, che richiama l’immagine delle bottiglie di vino da 5 litri (una bottiglia piuttosto grande con il collo stretto). Ma può essere anche una caraffa con tanto di manico e collo più svasato che assomiglia a una brocca. Potrebbe anche essere un vaso di vetro per conservare marmellate o ortaggi o il barattolo del miele. Un termine quanto mai generico che a me richiama l’orcio toscano, il recipiente di terracotta, panciuto e di forma allungata con il collo ristretto, spesso a due manici in cui si conservavano o trasportavano i liquidi. In antico era una unità di misura equivalente a circa 38 litri, ma rimpicciolito ecco che l’orcio era usato come una brocca.
jug= boccia, brocca, caraffa, bottiglia.
3) non avendo soldi per pagare l’oste, hanno pagato in natura

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thedrunkenmaidens.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=274

Barnacle Bill the Sailor

Una drinking song popolare in America variamente intitolata “Barnacle Bill ( o Bollocky Bill- Abraham Brown), the Sailor ”
Il contesto è quella di una night visiting song con botta e risposta tra la fanciulla e il marinaio, inevitabili le versioni pecorecce e anche nelle versioni “pulite” non mancano i doppi sensi.
La situazione è ripresa anche nei cartoons, vediamola nel triangolo Olivia, Bracio di Ferro e Bluto (nei panni di Barnacle Bill)!

ASCOLTA Kembra Phaler w/ Antony/Joseph Arthur/Foetus Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 (su Spotify) nella versione  la leggiadra fanciulla è un uomo che canta in farsetto e la voce del vecchio sporco marinaio infoiato è di Kembra Phaler -con effetto esilarante

Testo nella versione di Kembra Phaler
I
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Cried the fair young maiden!
II
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
Cried the fair young maiden
III
Well, it’s only me from over the sea
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I’m hard to windward and hard a-lee,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
I’ve newly come upon the shore,
And this is what I’m looking for,
A jade (1), a maid, or even a whore
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
IV
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Cried the fair young maiden
V
I’m old and rough and dirty and tough
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I never can get drunk enough,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor,
I drinks my whiskey when I can
Drinks it from an old tin can,
For whiskey is the life of man,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
VI
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Cried the fair young maiden
VII
You foolish girl, it’s nothing but sport,
Says Barnacle Bill the Sailor
The handsome gals is what I court
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
With my false heart and flatterin’ tongue
I courts ‘em all both old and young
I courts ‘em all, but marries none
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
VIII
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
Cried the fair young maiden
IX
Never no more you fucking whore,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
Tonite I’m sailin’ from the shore
Said Barnacle Bill the sailor.
I’m sailing away in another track
To give other maid a crack,
But keep it oiled till I come back,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LEI
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
II LEI
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
III LUI
Beh, sono solo io da oltre il mare
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
Ce l’ho duro controvento e sottovento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
sono appena sbarcato a terra
e questo è quanto cerco: una cavallona, una fanciulla o anche una puttana -disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
IV LEI
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
V LUI
Sono un vecchio sporco brutto ceffo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
e non mi ubriaco mai abbastanza
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
bevo whiskey quando posso
lo bevo da una vecchia lattina
perchè il whiskey è la vita di un uomo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VI LEI
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
VII LUI
Sei pazza, non è altro che divertimento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
alle belle ragazze faccio la corte
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
con cuore falso e lingua
ingannevole
le corteggio tutte, vecchie e giovani
le corteggio tutte, ma nessuna sposo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VIII LEI
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
IX LUI
Mai più fottuta puttana
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
stanotte sto salpando da terra
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
in partenza per un’altra scia
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
ma tienila oliata finchè non torno
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio

NOTE
1) jade arriva dai tempi di Shakespeare per indicare una ragazza che vale poco perchè consumata proprio come ol termine spregiativo per indicare una “giumenta” (jade)

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/whosthat.htm
http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/b/barnaclebillthesailor.html
https://perfect-beaker.livejournal.com/175213.html

Olaim Punch

Un canto in gaelico irlandese dal titolo Ólaim puins (I drink punch) ma più conosciuto con il titolo di Olam Punch  è una drinking song che richiama The Jug of punch. Il tema però più che essere un elogio al bere, loda la vita del mendicante.
Nelle canzoni popolari celtiche si leva talvolta un canto di protesta contro “il sistema”: uno spirito libero vagabonda per il paese, mendicante senza radici, suonatore ambulante che si dedica occasionalmente a lavori stagionali, e più spesso vive al di fuori dalla società civile. (continua)

ASCOLTA The Chieftains & Punch Brothers, Lark in the clear air + Olam Punch in Voice of the Ages 2012

ASCOLTA Danù con il titolo di “An Deirc” in “All things considered” 2002 (su Spotify) mantengono il ritornello ma aggiungono ulteriori strofe (vedi testo)

I
Ólaim puins is ólaim tae
Is an lá ina dhiaidh sin ólaim toddaí
Ní bhím ar meisce ach uair sa ré
Mo ghrása an déirc is an té do cheap í
II
Lá má bhím le híota tréith
Bím lá ‘na dhiaidh ag glaoch na gcannaí
Lá le fíon is arís gan bhraon
Mo ghrása an déirc is an té do cheap í
III
aAr mo theacht a luí ar thréad
An bhuí san fhéith is na héimhe ag leanaí
Báisteach fhill is rinn ar ghaoth
Ó, táim le déirc ní baol do mo gharraí
IV
Is sámh a bhím i mo luí le gríin
Gan suim sa saol ach sclíip is starraíocht
Gan cháin gan chíos ach m’intinn saor
Nach fearr í an déirc ná céird is ealaín!

TRADUZIONE IN INGLESE (da qui)
I
I drink punch and I drink tea/And the following day I drink toddy/ I’m only drunk but once a month/ Thanks for charity, and from anybody
II
Everyone considers all life’s ways
Thinks of the clergy, thinks of buying
Thinks of the army, its power and sway/ But sure charity is the trade I’m trying
III
Some farmed land now I see
The golden meadow and lambing sheep
There’s a driving rain and a cutting breeze
Never a threat to my crops, for none I keep
IV
Now under the sun I’m happy still
Never a care in the world, just joy replayed
No tax nor worry, but my own free will
Charity sure beats craft or trade
V
If one day I’m cursed with drought
The following day I’ll be ordering toddy
One day with wine, the next without
Thanks for charity, and from anybody
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Bevo il punch (1) e bevo il tè
e il giorno dopo bevo il toddy (2)
mi ubriaco solo una volta al mese
grazie alla carità della gente
II
Ciascuno valuta tutte le strade della vita; pensa a farsi prete o darsi al commercio o pensa all’esercito, la sua forza e il dominio, ma di certo la carità e l’affare che fa per me.
III
Ora guardo ai campi coltivati,
i campi dorati e le pecore che si accoppiano
c’è una pioggia battente e un venticello gelido
ma non ho preoccupazioni per il raccolto e nessuno da mantenere
IV
Ora sotto il sole sono ancora felice
non m’importa di niente; solo gioia ripetuta, niente tasse, nè preoccupazioni, ma solo la mia libera volontà, la carità di sicuro batte l’artigianato o il commercio
V
Se un giorno sono maledetto dalla siccità, il giorno seguente ordinerò del toddy, un giorno con vino, quello dopo senza,
grazie alla carità della gente

NOTE
1) il punch irlandese è il whisky bevuto con un po’ di acqua calda (con fetta di limone e chiodi di garofano, zucchero a piacere)
2) il toddy è il tè “corretto” con whisky o rhum e aromatizzato con cannella, chiodi di garofano e scorza di limone (zucchero e miele a piacere) per combattere i primi sintomi d’influenza! (per la ricetta qui)

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/danu/andeirc.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=53007
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic21661.html

BRING US IN GOOD ALE

Bring Us in Good Ale è un wassail song di origine medievale.
Trascrizioni del brano risalgono al 1460 (fonte Bodleian Library di Oxford), il canto era nel repertorio medievale dei menestrelli girovaghi che intrattenevano il pubblico dei villaggi durante le feste e i matrimoni, ed è stato incluso in una raccolta di canti e carols di Natale al tempo di re Enrico VI stampato nel 1847dalla Percy Society di Londra “Songs and Carols”  a cura di Thomas Wright.

E’ un’evidente parodia di The Salutation Carol (carol dell’Annunciazione) i menestrelli infatti  iniziavano in tono serio con “Nowell, Nowell, Nowell this is the salutation of the Angel Gabriel” (eventualmente con qualche strofa del carol) e poi proseguivano con l’invocazione “Portaci della buona birra per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!“, una dimostrazione delle licenziosità che si prendevano i questuanti dopo aver bevuto troppa buona birra, ma anche del clima festoso e godereccio delle più antiche feste del Solstizio d’Inverno (Midwinter o Yule e i Saturnalia). I questuanti non vogliono carne, pane, uova o dolci, ma chiamano a gran voce della buona birra, indirettamente così facendo rendono grazie alla Madonna per l’abbondanza di cibo della stagione.

Ascoltiamo la versione medievale dei Night Watch con “The Salutation Carol” come incipit (continua)

Maddy Prior ha registrato diverse verioni del brano sia con Tim Hart  che con la Carnival Band

Green Matthews (Chris Green & Sophie Matthews) in A Medieval Christmas 2012 (vedi)Maddy Prior & Tim Hart in Summer Solstice 1996 e in Haydays 2003 con la sola voce di Maddy in una versione più lenta e con diversi versi saltati

Young Tradition in The Holly Bears the Crown 1995


Bring us in good ale (1),
and bring us in good ale;
For our Blessed Lady’s sake,
bring us in good ale.
I
Bring us in no brown bread,
for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread,
for therein is no game(2);
Bring us in no roastbeef,
for there are many bones(3),
But bring us in good ale,
for that goes down at once
II
Bring us in no bacon,
for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us enough of that;
Bring us in no mutton,
for that is often lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes,
for they be seldom clean
III
Bring us in no eggs,
for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us nothing else;
Bring us in no butter,
for therein are many hairs;
Nor bring us in no pig’s flesh,
for that will make us boars
IV
Bring us in no puddings,
for therein is all God’s good;
Nor bring us in no venison,
for that is not for our blood(4);
Bring us in no capon’s flesh,
for that is often dear(5);
Nor bring us in no duck’s flesh,
for they slobber in the mere
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Portaci della buona birra,
portaci della buona birra
per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!
I
Non portarci del pane nero
perché è fatto di crusca,
non portarci del pane bianco
perché non è dei nostri.
Non portarci del manzo
perché ci sono troppe ossa,
ma portaci della buona birra,
che vada giù d’un fiato.
II
Non portarci della pancetta,
perché contiene molto grasso,
ma portaci della buona birra
e daccene abbastanza.
Non portarci del montone,
perché è spesso magro,
non portarci la trippa
perché raramente è pulita bene.
III
Non portarci uova
perché ci sono troppi gusci,
ma portaci della buona birra
e non darci altro.
Non portarci il burro
perché ci sono troppi peli,
non portarci carne di maiale
per quello che ci rendono i cinghiali.
IV
Non portarci dolci,
perché sono un bene di Dio,
non ci portare del cervo,
perché non è per la gente comune. Non portarci carne di cappone
per quello che ci è più caro,
non portarci carne di anatra
perché sguazza nel fango

NOTE
1) Nelle Isole Britanniche  si producevano birre non luppolate dette ALE; erano infatti le birre provenienti dal “continente” a contenere luppolo e quindi distinte con una parola diversa BEER! continua
2) trovato scritto anche come gain o grain, nella versione manoscritta invece come game: oltre a gioco, partita in senso colloquiale il termine si usa per dire “essere dei nostri” qui da intendersi come cibo che non si trova alla mensa della gente comune.
3) la carne di manzo non era consumata abitualmente nel Medioevo perché i bovini erano utilizzati nel lavoro dei campi e non allevati per la carne, quindi l’animale era ucciso e macellato solo una volta diventato molto vecchio e ossuto con la carne dura
4) our blood: letteralmente “nostro sangue”, la caccia al cervo era riservata al re e quindi la carne di cervo era mangiata solo dalla gente di sangue nobile.
5) il cappone è un gallo castrato per renderlo più grasso e più tenero

FONTI
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/bring_us_in_good_ale.htm
https://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultural/Music_P_files/P036_Ale.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/goodale.html

HERE’S A HEALTH TO THE COMPANY

Una emigration song proveniente dall’Irlanda del Nord e di probabile origine scozzese intitolata anche “The Parting Glass”  da confondere con l’altra più popolare “The Parting Glass”  che inizia con “Of all the money e’er I had“.
La sua forma standard è oggi quella registrata dai Chieftains
ASCOLTA Kevin Conneff (The Chieftains) in “A Chieftains Celebration, 1989 (strofe da I a III)

ASCOLTA Cara Dillon 2006

Un brano da renaissance fair, ascoltiamolo nella versione dei Blackmore’s Night in Autumn Sky 2010

e una perfetta tavern song finita nel video-gioco Assassin’s Creed Black Flag (strofe da I a III)


I
Kind friends and companions, come join me in rhyme
Come lift up your voices in chorus with mine
Come lift up your voices, all grief to refrain
For we may or might never all meet here again
Chorus:
Here’s a health to the company and one to my lass
Let us drink and be merry all out of one glass
Let us drink and be merry, all grief to refrain
For we may or might never all meet here again
II
Here’s a health to the dear lass that I love so well
For her style and for her beauty, that none can excel
There’s a smile upon her countenance as she sits on my knee
There is no man in this wide world as happy as me
III
Our ship lies at anchor, she’s ready to dock
I wish her safe landing without any shock
If ever I should meet you by land or by sea
I will always remember your kindness to me
IV
My footsteps may falter my wit it may fail
My course may be challenged by November gale
Ere fortune shall prove to be friend or foe
You will always be with me wherever I go
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Venite cari amici e compagni  e unitevi alla mia canzone,
venite e innalzate le voci in coro con la mia
venite a innalzare le voci e a raffrenare tutto il dolore
che forse  non potremo mai più rincontrarci ancora tutti qui
CORO:
Un brindisi alla compagnia e uno alla mia ragazza,
beviamo e cerchiamo tutto il divertimento in un bicchiere,
beviamo e cerchiamo di divertirci per raffrenare tutto il dolore,
che forse  non potremo mai più rincontrarci ancora tutti qui.

II
Alla salute della cara ragazza che amo coì tanto
per i suoi modi e la sua bellezza, che nessuna  può eguagliare,
c’è un sorriso sul suo viso quando si siede sulle mie ginocchia
e non c’è nessun uomo in questo mondo selvaggio felice come me
III
La nostra nave è in rada pronta per attraccare
le auguro uno sbarco in salvo senza alcun urto
e se ci incontreremo ancora per mare o per terra
mi ricorderò sempre la vostra cortesia verso di me
IV
I miei passi possono vacillare, e lo spirito fallire
il destino forse essere cambiato da una tempesta di novembre,
prima che la fortuna si mostrerà amica o nemica
tu sarai sempre con me ovunque andrò

FONTI
https://soundcloud.com/fifesing/sheila-stewart-the-parting-glass
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=161869
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=157681
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/heresahealthtothecompany.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=161869

DOWN AMONG THE DEAD MEN

Una popolare drinking song settecentesca attribuita erroneamente a John Dyer (1700-1758); l’equivoco nacque dalla dicitura di commento su un broadside del 1715  “A Song sung by Mr. Dyer at Mr. Bullock’s Booth at Southwark Fair,” trattandosi invece del  popolare cantore londinese Robert Dyer; la canzone si diffuse in epoca vittoriana fino a trovare la sua collocazione tra i canti goliardici degli studenti inglesi moderni. Dato il tema è finita anche nelle sound track del video gioco Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag una perfetta canzone da pirata.

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed Syndicate (strofe I, III, IV) la versione di Sean Dagher in Black Flag sea shanty su Spotify qui

ASCOLTA The Virginia Company in “Smash the Windows”


I
Here’s a health to the King (1), and a lasting peace
May faction be damn’d, and discord cease (2):
Come, let us drink it while we have breath,
For there’s no drinking after death.
And he who would this toast deny,
CHORUS
Down among the dead men (3),
down among the dead men,
Down, down, down, down;
Down among the dead men let him lie (4)!
II
Let charming beauty’s health go round,
With whom celestial joys are found.
And may confusion yet pursue
That selfish woman-hating crew.
And he who’d woman’s health deny,
III
In smiling Bacchus’ joys I’ll roll,
Deny no pleasures to my soul.
Let Bacchus’ health round briskly move,
For Bacchus is the friend of love.
And he that would this health deny,
IV
May love and wine their rights maintain,
And their united pleasures reign.
While Bacchus’ treasure crowns the board,
We’ll sing the joy that both afford.
And they that won’t with us comply,
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Alla salute del Re e alla pace duratura
possa la faziosità essere dannata e la discordia cessare:
vieni beviamo mentre siamo vivi
perchè non c’è da bere dopo la morte
e colui che rifiuta di brindare
Coro
giù tra le bottiglie vuote
giù tra le bottiglie vuote
giù, giù, giù, giù,
giù tra le bottiglie vuote possa finire!
II
Che la bellezza incantevole prosperi
con la quale si toccano gioie paradisiache
e possa il caos ancora perseguitare
quella ciurma egoista che odia la donna
e colui che la salute della donna nega..
III
Tra le gioie di Bacco ridente sguazzo
e non nego i piaceri al mio spirito
che il brindisi a Bacco circoli rapidamente
perchè Bacco è l’amico di Amore
e chi volesse questo brindisi negare ..
IV
Che Amore e Vino mantengano i loro diritti
e i loro piaceri uniti regnino.
Mentre il tesoro di Bacco corona la tavola
canteremo la gioia che entrambi dispensano e coloro che non vogliono a noi conformarsi ..

NOTE
1) in epoca vittoriana si brinda alla salute della Regina, ma originariamente la dedica era rivolta alla regina Anna di Gran Bretagna così iniziava il verso “Here’s a health to the mem’ry of Queen Anne”
2) anche scritto “To faction an end, to wealth increase”
3) Dead mens ono le bottiglie vuote
4) l’augurio è di finire lungo disteso a terra in stato incosciente per l’ubriachezza
FONTI
http://musicofyesterday.com/sheet-music-d/among-dead-men-dyer/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/4164.asp
http://thebards.net/music/lyrics/Down_Among_The_Dead_Men.shtml