Archivi categoria: Celtic Canada

Lass of Glanshee

Leggi in italiano

“The Lass of Glanshee” or “The maid of Glashee” or “The Rose of Glanshee” is a Scottish ballad penned by Andrew Sharpe (according to G Malcolm Laws -in American Balladry From Bristish Broadsides, 1957) in the late 1700s ‘Nineteenth century, on the tune “The Road and the Miles to Dundee
Curious character, Andrew Sharpe, cobbler from Perth (Scotland), but also flute player, painter, composer and singer of love songs, yet this song is best known in its version from Celtic Canada, as it was collected by Helen Creighton during her excursions in New Brunswick from 1954 to 1960 and transcribed in “Folksongs from Southern New Brunswick” (1971). The witness Angelo Dornan, lived in Elgin, NB (Eastern Canada) at the time of registration. Most of his repertoire comes from Northern Ireland, the place of origin of his parents.

The ballad is a “pastoral” songs, a very popular song in England, Ireland and Scotland in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: this literary genre is characterized by the love contrast between a shepherdess and a suitor (a shepherd boy, or as in this case , a gentleman of passage) often with an erotic or spicy allusive background. The textual versions are quite similar and describe the same story: while a rustic but very pretty shepherdess is herding her flock, a young man spy and courting her; the song is then developed on the model of a pastoral contrast, with him who trying to seduce her and she escapes, knowing full well that she would never become his bride, because of their social difference. In reality the young maidens who wandered through the countryside and the woods were easy prey (more or less consensual) of the “hunters” men and often these ballads ended with the announcement of unfortunate pregnancies.(see more)

HAPPY END

“The Lass of Glanshee” has a happy ending as in beautiful fairy tales they get married and live happily for ever!

Altan from Horse With A Heart 1989: with their balanced repertoire based on the traditional music of Donegal and the Scottish influences the Altan spread throughout the world ballads, nursery rhymes and songs in Gaelic. Their version of The Lass of Glanshee, performed on a song originally from Scotland, has become a standard for Irish music groups.
Anuna (I, II,IV,V, VI)

Cara Dillon live

Greenoch interesting version of the Italian duo Cecilia Gonnelli and Roger Taradel

THE LASS OF GLENSHEE
I
One morning in springtime
as day was a-dawning
Bright Phoebus had risen
from over the lea
I spied a fair maiden
as homeward she wandered
From herding her flocks
on the hills of Glenshee
II
I stood in amazement,
says I, “Pretty fair maid
If you will come down
to St. John’s Town (1) with me
There’s ne’er been a lady
set foot in my castle (2)
There’s ne’er been a lady
dressed grander than thee
III
A coach and six horses
to go at your bidding
And all men that speak
shall say “ma’am unto thee
Fine servants to serve you
and go at your bidding”
I’ll make you my bride,
my sweet lass of Glenshee”
IV
“Oh what do I care for
your castles and coaches?
And what do I care
for your gay grandeury (3)?
I’d rather be home at my cot,
at my spinning
Or herding my flocks
on the hills of Glenshee”
V
“Away with such nonsense
and get up beside me
E’er summer comes on
my sweet bride you will be
And then in my arms
I will gently caress thee”
‘Twas then she consented,
I took her with me
VI
Seven years have rolled on
since we were united
There’s many’s a change,
but there’s no change on me
And my love, she’s as fair
as that morn on the mountain
When I plucked me a wild rose (4)
on the hills of Glenshee

NOTES
1) the city of Perth has an ancient church ((St John’s Kirk) and formerly took the name of Saint John’s Toun or St Johnstone.
2) Perthshire is dotted with castles scattered across the beautiful countryside but also close to Perth: Balhousie Castle, Huntingtower Castle, Scone Palace, Elcho Castle, Fingask Castle, Strathallan Castle, Blair Castle (more)
3) the verse follows the popular Raggle Taggle Gypsie
4) they are not limited to holding hands, and the rose is not just a flower

SCOTTISH/CANADIAN VERSION: THE HILLS OF GLENSHEE

The Glenshee Hills are located in the county of Pert, the ‘Fairy hill’ in the center of Scotland, a popular winter ski resort and summer hiking destination.

With the title “The Hills of Glenshee” is the variant spread to Newfoundland.
Harry Hibbs a more country version, from best-known icon for traditional Newfoundland music.

THE HILLS OF GLENSHEE
I
One fine summer’s mornin’
as I went out walkin’,
Just as the grey dawn
flew over the sea,
I happened to spy
a fair haired young damsel,
Attending her flock
by the hills of Glenshee.
II
I said,” pretty fair one,
will you be my dear one,
For I’ll take you over,
my bride for to be;
And this very night
in my arms  I will hold you,
While you tend your flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
III
“Oh no, my dear sir,
you’ll not take me over,
None of your footmen
to wait upon me;
I would rather stay home
in my own homespun clothing,
And attend to my flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
IV
For twenty long years
we’ve both been together,
Seasons may change
but there’s no change in me;
And if God lets me live
and I have my right senses,
I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
V
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
She’s as pure as the perfume
blows over the sea;
And her cheeks are as pale
as the white rose of summer,
That spreads out its leaves
on the hills of Glenshee.
VI
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
I do love her so
and I know she loves me;
And I’ll never prove false
to my girl where I met her,
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.

LINK
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/2-10.htm
https://soundcloud.com/catherinecrowe/01-the-rose-of-glenshee?in=catherinecrowe/sets/field-recordings-of-angelo
http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/WiscFolkSong/data/docs/WiscFolkSong/400/000333.pdf
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50613
http://folksongsatlanticcanada.blogspot.it/2012/04/new-brunswick-folk-songs.html
https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/JNBS/article/view/20084/23145
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/26/hills.htm

La fanciulla della Valle delle Fate

Read the post in English

“The Lass of Glanshee” o “The maid of Glashee” o ancora “The Rose of Glanshee” è una ballata scozzese composta da Andrew Sharpe (secondo G Malcolm Laws -in American Balladry From Bristish Broadsides, 1957) sul finire del 1700 primi dell’Ottocento, sulla melodia The Road and the Miles to Dundee
Personaggio curioso, Andrew Sharpe, ciabattino di Perth (Scozia), ma anche suonatore di flauto, pittore, compositore e cantore di canti d’amore, eppure la canzone è meglio nota nella sua versione dal Celtic Canada, come è stata raccolta da Helen Creighton durante il suo lavoro di ricerca nel Nuovo Brunswick dal 1954 al 1960 e finita in “Folksongs from Southern New Brunswick” (1971)  . Il testimone Angelo Dornan, viveva a Elgin, NB (Canada orientale) al momento della registrazione. La maggior parte del suo repertorio proviene dall’Irlanda del Nord, il luogo d’origine dei suoi genitori.

La ballata si annovera tra i canti “pastorali” molto popolari in Inghilterra, Irlanda e Scozia nei secoli XVII e XVIII: questo genere letterario si caratterizza per il  contrasto amoroso tra una pastorella e un corteggiatore (anch’egli pastorello, oppure come in questo caso, un gentiluomo di passaggio) spesso a sfondo erotico o piccantemente allusivo. Le versioni testuali sono abbastanza simili e descrivono la stessa storia: mentre una rustica ma assai graziosa pastorella custodisce il gregge, un giovane la spia e la corteggia; la canzone si sviluppa quindi sul modello di contrasto amoroso con “botta e risposta” tra le parti, con lui che cerca di sedurla e lei che si sottrae, ben sapendo che non sarebbe mai diventata la sua sposa, a causa della loro differenza di rango. In realtà le giovani popolane che si aggiravano per le campagne e i boschi erano ben facili prede (più o meno consensuali) degli uomini “cacciatori” e spesso queste ballate si concludevano con l’annuncio di infauste gravidanze. (continua)

HAPPY END

“The Lass of Glanshee” ha un lieto fine come nelle belle favole i due si sposano e vivono per sempre felici e contenti!

Altan in Horse With A Heart 1989: con il loro equilibrato repertorio fondato sulla musica tradizionale del Donegal e gli influssi scozzesi  diffondono in tutto il mondo ballate, filastrocche e canzoncine in gaelico che finiscono immancabilmente nelle compilation di musica celtica. Così la loro versione di The Lass of Glanshee, pur eseguita su una canzone originaria della Scozia, è diventata uno standard per i gruppi di musica irlandese.
Anuna (I, II,IV,V, VI)

Cara Dillon live

Greenoch interessante la versione del duo italiano Cecilia Gonnelli e Roger Taradel


I
One morning in springtime
as day was a-dawning
Bright Phoebus had risen
from over the lea
I spied a fair maiden
as homeward she wandered
From herding her flocks
on the hills of Glenshee
II
I stood in amazement,
says I, “Pretty fair maid
If you will come down
to St. John’s Town (1) with me
There’s ne’er been a lady
set foot in my castle (2)
There’s ne’er been a lady
dressed grander than thee
III
A coach and six horses
to go at your bidding
And all men that speak
shall say “ma’am unto thee
Fine servants to serve you
and go at your bidding”
I’ll make you my bride,
my sweet lass of Glenshee”
IV
“Oh what do I care for
your castles and coaches?
And what do I care
for your gay grandeury (3)?
I’d rather be home at my cot,
at my spinning
Or herding my flocks
on the hills of Glenshee”
V
“Away with such nonsense
and get up beside me
E’er summer comes on
my sweet bride you will be
And then in my arms
I will gently caress thee”
‘Twas then she consented,
I took her with me
VI
Seven years have rolled on
since we were united
There’s many’s a change,
but there’s no change on me
And my love, she’s as fair
as that morn on the mountain
When I plucked me a wild rose (4)
on the hills of Glenshee
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Una mattina di Primavera
allo spuntar del giorno,
Febo luminoso era sorto
e da oltre il prato
osservai una graziosa fanciulla
mentre vagabondava sulla via di casa
e badava al gregge
sulle colline di Glenshee.
II
Meravigliato le dissi:
“Dolce e bella fanciulla,
se tu verrai a valle
a Perth con me
nessuna altra donna
metterà piede nel mio castello
e nessuna altra donna sarà
vestita più sontuosamente di te
III
Una carrozza trainata da 6 cavalli
avrai al tuo servizio
e tutti gli uomini che interrogherete
vi diranno ‘Madama al vostro cospetto
eleganti servitori per servirvi
e andare al vostro comando’
ti farò mia sposa,
mia dolce ragazza di Glenshee”
IV
“Ma cosa volete che m’importi del vostro castello e della vostra carrozza?
Cosa volete che mi interessi della vostra ricchezza?
Preferisco stare a casa nel mio letto,
al mio filatoio
o pascolare il gregge
sulle colline di Glenshee”
V
“Basta con queste sciocchezze
e fermati accanto a me,
già l’estate arriverà
tu sarai la mia dolce sposa
e allora tra le braccia
ti stringerò piano”
Così lei acconsentì
e la presi con me.
VI
Sette anni sono passati
da quando ci siamo sposati
ci sono stati dei cambiamenti,
ma non per me
e il mio amore, lei è chiara
come quel mattino sulla montagna
quando mi colse una rosa selvaggia sulle Colline di Glenshee

NOTE
1) la città di Perth che conseva una antica chiesa (St John’s Kirk) e anticamente prendeva il nome di Saint John’s Toun o St Johnstone.
2) il Perthshire è disseminato di castelli sparsi per la bellissima campagna ma anche vicini alla città di Perth: Castello di Balhousie, Castello di Huntingtower, Scone Palace, Elcho Castle, Castello di Fingask, Castello di Strathallan, Blair Castle (continua)
3) la strofa ricalca la popolarissima Raggle Taggle Gypsie
4) i due non si sono limitati a tenersi per mano, e la rosa non è solo un fiore

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE/CANADESE: THE HILLS OF GLENSHEE

Le colline di Glenshee si trovano nella contea di Pert,  la ‘Fairy Glen’ la collina delle Fate, quasi al centro della Scozia è una rinomata località sciistica invernale e meta di escursioni d’estate.

Con il titolo “The Hills of Glenshee” è la variante diffusa a Terranova.
Harry Hibbs una versione più country, dall’icona della musica tradizionale di Terranova


I
One fine summer’s mornin’
as I went out walkin’,
Just as the grey dawn
flew over the sea (1),
I happened to spy
a fair haired young damsel,
Attending her flock
by the hills of Glenshee.
II
I said,” pretty fair one,
will you be my dear one,
For I’ll take you over,
my bride for to be;
And this very night
in my arms  I will hold you,
While you tend your flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
III
“Oh no, my dear sir,
you’ll not take me over,
None of your footmen
to wait upon me;
I would rather stay home
in my own homespun clothing,
And attend to my flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
IV
For twenty long years
we’ve both been together,
Seasons may change
but there’s no change in me;
And if God lets me live
and I have my right senses,
I’ll never prove false (2)
to the girl on Glenshee.
V
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
She’s as pure as the perfume
blows over the sea;
And her cheeks are as pale
as the white rose of summer,
That spreads out its leaves
on the hills of Glenshee.
VI
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
I do love her so
and I know she loves me;
And I’ll never prove false
to my girl where I met her,
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Una bella mattina d’estate
mentre ero a passeggio
proprio quando la pallida alba
sorgeva dal mare
mi capitò di osservare
una giovane fanciulla dai capelli biondi
che badava al gregge
sulle colline di Glenshee.
II
Dissi: “Bella damigella,
volete essere la mia favorita
perchè vi prenderò
per essere la mia sposa
e questa stessa notte
tra le mie braccia vi terrò,
mentre badate al gregge
sulle colline di Glenshee”
III
“Oh no caro Signore
non mi prenderete
e nessuono dei vostri servitori
mi renderà omaggio;
preferisco stare a casa,
nei miei vestiti fatti a mano
a pascolare il gregge
sulle colline di Glenshee”
IV
Per venti lunghi anni
siamo stati insieme,
le stagioni possono mutare
ma io non sono cambiato;
e se Dio mi farà vivere
nel pieno possesso delle mie facoltà
non tradirò mai
la ragazza di Glenshee
V
Lei è Maria, la mia Maria
il mio amato tesoro,
è pura come la brezza
che soffia dal mare
e le sue guance sono pallide
come la rosa bianca dell’estate
quando le foglie germogliano
sulle Colline di Glenshee
VI
Lei è Maria, la mia Maria
il mio amato tesoro,
l’amo così
e so che lei mi ama
non tradirò mai
la mia ragazza che ho incontrato,
non tradirò mai
la ragazza di Glenshee
non tradirò mai
la ragazza di Glenshee

NOTE
1) in senso lato non essendoci la vista mare dalle Glenshee
2) letteralmente “non sarò mai falso”

continua
FONTI
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/2-10.htm
https://soundcloud.com/catherinecrowe/01-the-rose-of-glenshee?in=catherinecrowe/sets/field-recordings-of-angelo
http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/WiscFolkSong/data/docs/WiscFolkSong/400/000333.pdf
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50613
http://folksongsatlanticcanada.blogspot.it/2012/04/new-brunswick-folk-songs.html
https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/JNBS/article/view/20084/23145
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/26/hills.htm

White are the far-off plains

Nel cd “To drive the cold winter away” (1987) Loreena Mckennitt rende omaggio alla sua terra, il Canada e al suo illustre poeta in lingua inglese Archibald Lampman (1861 –1899)  mettendo in musica la poesia “Snow”. Denominato il “Canadian Keats” Lampman scrisse più di 300 poesie la maggior parte basate sull’osservazione del paesaggio sia rurale che  naturale, ma morì a soli 38 anni per un attacco di cuore; amante della vita all’aria aperta trasse ispirazione dal territorio nei dintorni della città di Ottawa, dove visse per la maggior parte della sua vita; fu amico del poeta Duncan Campbell Scott, che si prodigò per pubblicarne gli ultimi lavori letterari post-mortem.
Lyrics of Earth” è la sua seconda raccolta di poesie pubblicata nel 1895 da Copeland and Day di Boston, tuttavia le vendite furono scarse, sebbene il poeta fosse già noto per le sue pubblicazioni letterarie presso varie e prestigiose riviste inglesi, americane e canadesi.

Tom Thomson: The last snow

ASCOLTA Loreena McKennitt, il brano è riportato oltre che in  “To drive the cold winter away” (1987) anche in “A Midwinter nights dream” (2008) che riprende e amplia l’EP “A winter garden: five songs for the season” del 1995. La prima versione ha un arrangiamento musicale più essenziale, incentrato sull’arpa e il suono lontano del flauto; nella seconda versione si aggiungono violoncello, violino e organetto. La melodia composta dalla McKennitt è una soave ninnananna che rasserena e invita a dolci sogni.

ASCOLTA la prima versione; è questo il secondo album dell’artista canadese ancora improntato alla semplicità e essenzialità della forma (strofe I e da III a VI)

ASCOLTA la seconda versione (strofe I e da III a VI)

ASCOLTA Cedar Breaks in “Tyme, Aspects of Home” 2013: lasciano che sia il violino a portare il lamento, addolcito dalle armonie delle chitarre e dalle voci di Rebecca Croft e Diana Glissmeyer  (strofe I, III, II, VI) il video è prodotto da Norman Bosworth filmato nell’inverno del 2012 presso le Rocky Mountains.


I
White are the far-off plains (1),
and white the fading forests grow;
wind dies out along the heights
denser still the snow,
A gathering weight on roof and tree,
Falls down scarce audibly.
II
The road before me smooths
and fills apace, and all about
The fences dwindle, and the hills
Are blotted slowly out;
The naked trees loom spectrally
Into the dim white sky.
III
Meadows and far-sheeted streams
Lie still without a sound;
Like some soft minister(2) of dreams
The snow-fall hoods me round;
In wood and water, earth and air,
silence is everywhere.
IV
Save when at lonely spells (3)
Some farmer’s sleigh, urged on,
With rustling runners and sharp bells,
Swings by me and is gone;
Or from the empty waste I hear
A sound remote and clear;
V
The barking of a dog,
To cattle, is sharply pealed,
Borne echoing from some wayside stall
Or barnyard far afield;
Then all is silent and the snow falls
Settling soft and slow
VI
The evening deepens and the gray
Folds closer earth and sky
The world seems shrouded far away.
Its noises sleep, and I
secret as yon buried streams
plod dumbly on and dream.
I dream
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Bianche sono le pianure lontane,
e bianche le foreste che si scolorano
il vento svanisce dietro le alture
si addensa la neve,
accumulando peso su tetti e alberi
mentre scende silenziosa.
II
La strada innanzi a me si addolcisce
e si riempie in fretta e tutt’intorno
gli steccati scompaiono e le colline
sono pian piano offuscate;
gli alberi spogli si profilano spettrali
contro il cielo bianco e fioco.
III
Prati e torrenti ricoperti di neve
giacciono immobili senza suono;
come un sommesso Ministro dei sogni, la nevicata mi sovrasta;
nel bosco e nell’acqua, in cielo e in terra, il silenzio è in ogni dove.
IV
Tranne quando sporadicamente
la slitta di un contadino, incitata,
con sottili lame e stridule campanelle, mi scivola accanto e scompare; o sento, dalla landa disabitata un suono remoto e chiaro;
V
l’abbaiare di un cane,
lo scampanare acuto del bestiame
eco partorito da qualche stalla ai bordi della strada o da un aia in lontananza;
poi tutto è silenzio e la neve cade
depositandosi soffice e lenta.
VI
La sera imbrunisce, ed il grigio
unisce cielo e terra
il mondo appare velato e lontano;
i suoi rumori dormono, ed io, nascosto come quel torrente sepolto, persevero silente e sogno.
Io sogno

NOTE
*tratta in parte da qui, la poesia di Archibald Lampman nella versione integrale qui
1)  nella seconda versione diventa fields
2) l’angelo, ministro di Dio, mediatore tra l’uomo e la divinità, ambasciatore; la nevicata  mette tutto a tacere e invita al sonno, ottundendo i sensi sia della vista che dell’udito e ponendo l’io al centro di sè, racchiuso in sè. L’immagine è conclusa nella strofa finale in cui il poeta sogna. L’immagine evoca il cimitero e la morte, l’angelo di pietra ritratto su molte tombe.
3) lonely spells è da intendersi in senso temporale, letteralmente “periodi isolati” infatti nell’originale è scritto “lonely intervals” che ho preferito risolvere con un avverbio

FONTI
http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/lampman_archibald_12E.html
https://www.kobo.com/it/it/ebook/archibald-lampman

THE MUMMERS ARE PLANKIN’ HER DOWN

Mummers sono uomini (e donne) travestiti e camuffati, che nascondono il volto dietro veli e teli con il buco per gli occhi e la bocca, simili a spettri, e che un tempo, in certi particolari giorni dell’anno, andavano a visitare i loro vicini di casa in casa, cantando e ballando e facendo confusione. (vedi introduzione)

CHRISTMAS MUMMING

Un’usanza solstiziale che richiama certe tradizioni celtiche di Samain (vedi) è quella dell’house visiting  tipica del Mumming Natalizio diffusa un tempo nelle Isole Britanniche e anche nei paesi con una forte immigrazione irlandese e scozzese.
mummer-songLa tradizione che andava scomparendo a Terranova è stata documentata nientemeno che con una canzone scritta nel 1973 da Bud Davidge del gruppo Simani, dal titoloThe Mummer’s song (illustrata da Ian Wallace ).
Oggi il Mumming Natalizio si è trasformato in una sorta di parata carnevalesca per le strade, mentre un tempo era una house-visiting cioè un giro casa per casa dei mummers che venivano accolti nella stanza più calda (di solito la cucina) e rifocillati con bevande.
Travestiti in modo stravagante ed estemporaneo (con grottesche imbottiture per deformare la corporatura, con gli indumenti che in genere si portano sotto i vestiti portati invece sopra – reggiseni mutandoni del nonno e calzamaglia, con i volti incappucciati o velati o anneriti) “le maschere” portavano lo scompiglio e un po’ di paura, soprattutto perchè era difficile riconoscere in quei travestimenti, il vicino della porta accanto: uno suonava il violino e un altro l’organetto e avrebbero danzato per un po’ con gli abitanti della casa per portare il buonumore.

ASCOLTA Simani 

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea inizia direttamente con le strofe

Spoken:
Don’t seem like Christmas if the Mummers are not here,
Granny would say as she’d knit in her chair;
Things have gone modern and I s’pose that’s the cause,
Christmas is not like it was.
(Knock, knock, knock, knock)
Please open the door. We have…
I
Hark, what’s the noise out by the porch door?
(dear) Granny, ‘tis Mummers, there’s twenty or more.
Her old weathered face brightens up with a grin,
“Any Mummers, nice Mummers ‘lowed in?”
II
Come in, lovely Mummers, don’t bother the snow,
We can wipe up the water sure after you go;
Sit if you can or on some Mummer’s knee,
Let’s see if we know who ya be.
III
Ah, there’s big ones and small ones, and tall ones and thin,
(There’s) boys dressed as women and girls dressed as men,
(With) humps on their backs and mitts on their feet,
My blessed, we’ll die with the heat.
IV
(Well), there’s only one there that I think that I know,
That tall fellow standing alongside the stove;
He’s shaking his fist for to make me not tell,
Must be Willy from out on the hill.
V
Oh, but that one’s a stranger, if ever was one,
With his underwear stuffed and his trapdoor undone (1);
Is he wearing his mother’s big forty-two bra?
I knows, but I’m not going to say.
VI
I s’pose you fine mummers would turn down a drop
Of home brew or alky, whatever you got?
Not the one with his rubber boots on the wrong feet,
He’s enough for to do him a week.(2)
VII
Well I ‘spose you can dance? Yeah, they all nod their heads,
They’ve been tapping their feet ever since they came in;
And now that the drinks have been all passed around,
the mummers are plankin’ her down (3).
VIII
Ah, be careful the lamp! Now hold on to the stove,
Don’t you swing Granny hard, ‘cause you know that she’s old;
No need for to care how you buckles the floor (4),
‘Cause the mummers have danced here before.
IX
Oh, my God, how hot is it? We better go,(5)
I allow that we’ll all get the devil’s own cold;
Good night and good Christmas, mummers me dear,
Please God, we will see you next year.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Parlato:

“Non sembra Natale se non arrivano le Maschere- direbbe la Nonnina mentre sferruzza sulla sua sedia – i tempi sono diventati moderni e credo che sia questo il motivo,
per cui il Natale non è com’era”
Toc, Toc, Toc, Toc, 
“Aprite la porta per favore abbiamo…”
I
Ascolta, che rumore viene dalla porta del portico?
“Cara Nonnina, ecco le Maschere, sono una ventina o più.”
La sua faccia segnata dalle rughe si illumina con un sorriso
“Dei Mummers, bei Mummers possiamo entrare?”
II
“Ah venite cari mummers, non badate alla neve, asciugheremo l’acqua dopo che ve ne sarete andati;
sedetevi dove potete oppure sulle ginocchia di qualche altra Maschera.
Cercheremo di indovinare chi siete.”
III
Ah ce ne sono di grandi e di piccoli
di alti e di magri,
ci sono uomini vestiti da donna e ragazze vestite da uomini,
con gobbe sulla schiena e muffole ai piedi
“Benedetto me, scoppieremo dal caldo!!”.
IV
“Beh ce n’è soltanto uno che credo di conoscere,
quel tipo alto che sta accanto alla stufa;
sta agitando il pugno per non farmelo dire,
potrebbe essere Willy che viene dalla collina.”
V
“Oh ma quell’altro è uno straniero, se mai ce ne fosse uno, con la biancheria imbottita e la patta sul didietro aperta(1), indossa il grosso reggiseno taglia 42 della madre!
Lo conosco, ma non dirò chi è”
VI
“Immagino che voi bei mummers gradiate un goccetto
di birra fatta in casa o del distillato, ne volete?”
“Non quello con gli stivali di gomma nel piede sbagliato, ha fatto il pieno per tutta la settimana”(2)
VII
“Immagino che voi sappiate danzare?” Si – tutti annuiscono
hanno battuto il tempo con il piede sin da quando sono arrivati,
e ora che è stato fatto girare il bere,
di certo i mummers ci daranno dentro (3).
VIII
Attenti alla lampada! Adesso tenetevi alla stufa!
Non fate girare la nonnina in fretta, perché sapete che è anziana;
e non badate se rigate il pavimento (4)
perché i mummers hanno danzato qui da prima.
IX
“Oh mio Dio ma quanto caldo fa? E’ meglio se andiamo (5)”
“Suppongo che abbiamo tutti il sangue freddo come il diavolo”
“Buona Notte e Buon Natale,
miei cari mummers
a Dio piacendo, vi vedremo il prossimo anno”

NOTE
1) letteralmente botola si riferisce ad uno sbrago nei pantaloni sul didietro
2) i Great Big Sea dicono invece
Sure, the one with his rubber boots on the wrong feet
Ate enough for to do him all week.
3) letteralmente “la spalmeranno a terra” nel senso che la danza diventerà sempre più frenetica
4) i Great Big Sea dicono: And never you mind how you buckle the floor
5) i Great Big Sea dicono: We’ll never know

FIGGY DUFF with no Figgy Pudding

“Tarry Trousers” l’esibizione-concerto dei Figgy Duff per natale con musica e mummers

il concerto completo qui

FONTI
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/684274795
http://thegrimmteaparty.blogspot.it/2009/12/have-yourself-creepy-little-christmas.html
http://www.somethingsaturdays.com/the-blog/mummers-parade-saturday
https://joannadawson.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/any-mummers-llowd-in/
http://www.msgr.ca/msgr-2/mummering4.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/mummers.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/mummerscarol.htm

HARBOUR LE COU

“Harbour le cou” è una sea song popolare a Terranova (Newfoundland), Canada, il racconto umoristico di uno sfortunato marinaio di Torbay che appena sbarcato a Harbour Le cou trova una damigella da corteggiare, ma incontra anche un vecchio amico il quale molto poco cameratescamente lo smaschera per quel donnaiolo che è mandando i suoi saluti a moglie e figli..

L’AUTORE

“Captain” Jack Dodd (1902-1978) di Torbay fu pescatore, marinaio, scrittore di canzoni e cantante, cercatore di tesori, un Jack of all -trade ma soprattutto un avventuriero. Si dice abbia fatto il giro del mondo per ben tre volte. Ha scritto ‘The Wind in the Rigging‘ (1972)  e “Cabot’s Voyage to Newfoundland” (1974) vedi

IL PORTO

Rose Blanche-Harbour le cou è un piccolo paese di pescatori che si trova sulla costa sud-occidentale dell’isola di Terranova in una piccola baia, abitata pare solo dal 1810

VIDEO di Paul Corman

LA CANZONE

ASCOLTA Gordon Lightfoot 1964

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea

ASCOLTA Ryan’s fancy


I
As I rode ashore from my schooner close by
A girl on the beach sir I chanced to espy,/Her hair it was red and her bonnet was blue/Her place of abode was in Harbour Lecou.
II
Oh boldly I asked her to walk on the sand
She smiled like an angel and held out her hand
So I buttoned me guernsey(1) and hoved way me chew(2)
In the dark rolling (flowing) waters of Harbour Lecou
III
My ship she lay anchored far out on the tide
As I strolled along with that maid at my side/I told her I loved her, I said I’ll be true,/And I winked at the moon over Harbour Lecou
IV
As we walked on the sands(3) at the close of the day
I thought of my wife who was home in Torbay(4)
I knew that she’d kill me if she only knew
I was courting this lassie in Harbour Lecou.
V
As we passed a log cabin(5) that stood on the shore
I met an old comrade I’d sailed with before,
He treated me kindly saying “Jack, how are you?/Its seldom I see you in Harbour Lecou”.
VI
And as I was parting, this maiden in tow,/He broke up my party with one single blow/ He said “Regards to your missus, and your wee kiddies too,
I remember her well, she’s from Harbour Lecou”.
VII
I looked at this damsel a standing ‘long side/Her jaw it just dropped and her mouth opened wide
And then like a she-cat upon me she flew/And I fled from the furys of Harbour Lecou(6)
VIII
So come all you young sailors who walk on the shore
Beware of old comrades you sailed with before
Beware of the maidens with the bonnets of blue
And the pretty (fighting) young damsels of Harbour Lecou.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Mentre sbarcavo a terra dalla mia goletta
una ragazza sul litorale mi è capitato di vedere
dai capelli rossi e con il berretto blu
abitava a Harbour Lecou.
II
Le ho chiesto con baldanza di passeggiare sulla spiaggia
lei sorrise come un angelo e tese la mano
così mi sono abbottonato il Guernsey (1) e ho gettato la mia cicca (2)
nelle cullanti acque scure di Harbour Lecou
III
La mia nave era all’ancora in alto mare
mentre io passeggiavo con quella fanciulla al fianco
le dissi che l’amavo e che ero sincero
e strizzai l’occhio alla luna su Harbour Lecou
IV
Mentre camminavamo sulla spiaggia (3) sul finir del giorno
pensavo a mia moglie che era a casa a Torbay (4)
sapevo che mi avrebbe ucciso se solo avesse saputo
che stavo corteggiando questa ragazza di Harbour Lecou
V
Mentre oltrepassavamo un capanno(5) che stava sulla spiaggia
incontrai un vecchio compagno con cui avevo navigato un tempo
mi trattò gentilmente dicendo “Jack come va? Raramente ti vedo a Harbour Lecou”
VI
E mentre ci separavamo con questa ragazza a rimorchio,
mi ha rovinato la festa e tutto d’un fiato disse “Salutami la tua signora e anche i tuoi bambini, me la ricordo bene è di Harbour Lecou”
VII
Guardai verso la fanciulla che mi stava al fianco,
la mascella le cadde e la bocca si spalancò e poi come una gatta verso di me si lanciò e io fuggii dalla furia di Harbour Lecou (6)
VIII
Così venite tutti giovani marinai che passeggiate sulla spiaggia
fate attenzione ai vecchi compagni con cui avete navigato un tempo,
fate attenzione alle fanciulle con il berretto blu
e alle giovani (combattive) fanciulle di Harbour Lecou
maglione guernsey
tratto da http://www.aransweatermarket.com/mens-crew-neck-guernsey-sweater

NOTE
1) maglione da marinaio detto ‘Ganzie‘ perchè confezionato nell’isola di Guernsey, è diventato un indumento tradizionale dei pescatori inglesi. Il modello originale è lavorato in un solo pezzo senza cuciture partendo dal collo e per praticità il davanti è identico al dietro. Le maniche sono leggermente sopra il polso, dettaglio che serviva per non bagnarsi  con l’acqua di mare durante il lavoro. La lavorazione della maglia è molto stretta a maglia rasata o con motivi a trecce e zig zag. Era tradizionalmente confezionato dalle mogli (o sorelle) dei pescatori con i motivi che si passavano di madre in figlia attraverso le generazioni (un po’ come i motivi aran irlandesi).
Due erano gli stili: quello da lavoro (”working”) a maglia rasata detto anche in inglese plain stitch, Jersey Stitch, Flat Stitch, o Stockinette Stitch, e l’altro raffinato (”finer”) per le grandi occasioni.
2) to heave away one’s chew
3) oppure we strolled along
4) Torbay è una cittadina dell’isola di Terranova e si trova nella penisola di Avalon vicino a Saint John’s
5) tipica costruzione con tronchi di legno dei pescatori; i capanni sono piccoli e costruiti prorpio sull’acqua come rimessa della barca e le attrezzature per la pesca.
6) oppure Was a fit of the furies in Harbour Le Cou

FONTI
http://roseblanche.ca/about_rose-blanche.html
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/munfla/dodd.php
http://guernsey-knitwear.myshopify.com/pages/the-history-of-the-guernsey-jumper
https://lamagliadimarica.com/2014/05/03/guernsey-i-pullover-dei-pescatori-dellisola-del-canale/
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/lecou.htm
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/18-04.htm
http://gaddingaboutwithgrandpat.blogspot.it/2012/08/harbour-le-cou-newfoundland.html
http://www.aransweatermarket.com/mens-crew-neck-guernsey-sweater

AN INNIS AIGH

L'”happy island” di questo canto in gaelico scozzese che arriva dall’isola di Capo Bretone è Margaree Island ossia la Sea Wolf Island National Wildlife Area, un isolotto dalla curiosa forma di balena, abitato solo da uccelli (vedi) che si trova nel Golfo di San Lorenzo al largo della costa di Capo Bretone, Nuova Scozia.

La foto dell’ultimo abitante dell’isola, Alasdair Fheachair MacLellan scattata da Joanne MacPherson and Gil MacLeod, 1950

L’autore del brano è Angus Y. MacLellan che per una trentina d’anni è stato guardiano del faro su Margaree Island. Angus Y. MacLellan was a Gaelic scholar and bard, born at Southwest Margaree in 1878. Most of his poetry was written during the period 1912-1946 when he operated the Margaree Island (Sea Wolf Island) lighthouse. MacLellan lived on the island for 50 years and had a large family The family raised a large number of sheep to supplement their income. MacLellan retired as light keeper on 10 July 1946. He was patronymically known as Aonghas Iain ‘ic Iain ‘ic Chaluim. His grandfather came from Morar, Scotland. (tratto da qui)

Un genere non insolito tra i canti del popolo, è il canto scritto da chi è arrivato alla sua vecchiaia e chiede di poter riposare in pace in quel pezzo di paradiso isolato e incontaminato in cui ha avuto la sorte di nascere. Sono canti pieni di nostalgia ma tutto sommato sereni come sono di solito gli occhi degli anziani. (vedi anche aignish on the machair)

ASCOLTA  The Chieftains & The Rankins in Fire in the Kitchen 1998 registrato in Canada con vari artisti folk della Nuova Scozia

La versione cantata da Raylene Rankin quando aveva 16 anni qui

ORIGINALE GAELICO SCOZZESE
I
Seinn an duan seo dhan Innis Àigh,
An innis uaine as gile tràigh;
Bidh sian air uairean a’ bagairt cruaidh ris
Ach ‘s e mo luaidh-sa bhith ann a’ tàmh.
II
Càit’ as tràith’ an tig samhradh caomh
Càit’ as tràith’ an tig blàth air craoibh
Càit’ as bòidhche an seinn an smeòrach
Air bhàrr nan ògan? ‘S an Innis Àigh!
III
An t-iasg as fiachaile dlùth don tràigh
Is ann m’a chrìochan is miann leis tàmh;
Bidh gillean èasgaidh le dorgh is lìontan
Moch, moch ga iarraidh mun Innis Àigh.
IV
Tiugainn leam-sa chun na tràigh
‘S an fheasgar chìuin-ghil aig àm an làin,
‘S chì thu ‘m bòidhchead ‘s an liuthad seòrsa
De dh’eòin tha còmhnaidh ‘s an Innis Àigh.
V
‘S ged thèid mi cuairt chun an taoibh ud thall,
‘S mi ‘n dùil air uairibh gu fan mi ann,
Tha tàladh uaigneach le teas nach fuaraich
Gam tharraing buan don Innis Àigh.
VI
O ‘s geàrr an ùine gu ‘n teirig là;
Thig an oidhche ‘s gun iarr mi tàmh.
Mo chadal buan-sa bidh e cho suaimhneach
Ma bhios mo chluasag ‘s an Innis Àigh.

Traduzione inglese*
I
Sing this song to the Happy Island,
The green isle with the whitest beach;
Storms sometimes attack it severely,
But I love to live there.
II
Where does gentle summer arrive earlier/Where does blossom appear on trees earlier
Where does the thrush sing more beautifully
On the young branches? In the Happy Island.
III
The most valuable fish close to shore/Prefers to live near your boundaries;/Active lads with handlines and nets/Fish very early around the Happy Island.
IV
Come with me to the beach
On a calm evening at high tide,
And you will see the beauty and many species
Of birds that live in the Happy Island.
V
And although I go to visit yonder country-side,/Sometimes thinking that I may stay there,/A mysterious attraction with heat that will not cool
Draws me relentlessly to the Happy Island.
VI
Oh, the time is short till the day ends;
Night will come and I will seek rest;
My eternal slumber will be so tranquil
If my pillow is in the Happy Island.
traduzione italiano  di Cattia Salto
I
Canta questa canzone all’isola felice
l’isola verde con le spiagge più bianche,
le tempeste a volte la colpiscono duramente, ma io amo viverci
II
Dove la dolce estate arriva prima?
Dove i boccioli spuntano presto sugli alber?
Dove il tordo canta più melodiosamente
sui nuovi rami?
Sull’isola felice
III
Il più pregiato pesce vicino alla costa
preferisce vivere dalle nostre parti,
operosi ragazzi con lenze e reti,
lo vanno a pescare presto  intorno all’isola felice
IV
Vieni con me alla spiaggia
in una tranquilla sera con l’alta marea e tu vedrai la bellezza di tante specie di uccelli
che vivono sull’isola felice
V
E anche se vado a visitare altri paesi
e penso a volte che potrei restarci,
un fascino misterioso, un ardore che mai si raffredda,
mi attira inesorabilmente verso l’isola felice
VI
Oh il tempo è breve al finir del giorno
la notte verrà e io cercherò riposo,
il mio sonno eterno sarà così quieto
se il mio cuscino sarà l’isola felice.

*traduzione  francese di Dave Ferguson qui

FONTI
https://mapcarta.com/24477976
https://www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/default.asp?lang=En&n=1EA4347A-1
http://www.beatoninstitutemusic.ca/gaelic/an-innis-aigh.html
http://beatoninstitute.com/maclellan-angus-y
http://charrette.strathlorne.com/archives/781
http://www.nslps.com/dir_AboutLights/LighthouseSingle.aspx?LID=232
https://thesession.org/recordings/420

I’SE THE B’Y

Una sea song tradizionale di Terranova (in inglese Newfoundland), l’isola di fronte alla costa orientale del Canada. E’ stata raccolta da Kenneth Peacock e Gerald S Doyle e pubblicata nel “Folk Songs of Canada”, 1954 (anche nella raccolta di Gerald S Doyle “Old-Time Songs of Newfoundland,” 1955) per diventare popolare in tutto il paese.

I’SE THE B’Y

Si tratto di una canzoncina apparentemente non-sense sulla vita di una comunità di pescatori, ma che leggendo tra le righe (ovvero con il Dizionario di Terranovese in mano) un po’ di senso, ossia di doppio-senso ce l’ha!
terranova-pesca-merluzzo

 

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea 1993


I
I’se the b’y(1) that builds the boat
And I’se the b’y that sails her
I’se the b’y that catches the fish (2)
And brings ‘em home to Lizer(3)
CHORUS
Hip yer(4) partner, Sally Tibbo(5)
Hip yer partner, Sally Brown(5)
Fogo, Twillingate, Mor’ton’s Harbour(6)
All around the circle
II
Sods and rinds(7) to cover yer flake (8)
Cake (9) and tea for supper
Cod-fish in the spring o’ the year
Fried in maggoty butter
III
I don’t want your maggoty fish (10)
They’re no good for winter
I can buy as good as that
Down in Bonavista
IV
I took Lizer to a dance
And fast as she could travel
And every step that she did take
Was up to her knees in gravel(11)
V
Susan White she’s out of sight
Her petticoat wants a border(12)
Old Sam Oliver in the dark
He kissed her in the corner
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono io il tipo (1) che si costruisce la barca e ci naviga sopra,
sono io il tipo che prende il pesce (2)
e lo porta a casa da Liza. (3)
CORO
Gira (4) con il tuo compagno Sally Tibbo
Gira con il tuo compagno Sally Brown (5)
Fogo, Twillingate,
Moreton’s Harbour(6)
tutti in cerchio
II
Zolle di terra e rametti (7)per coprire la piattaforma per l’essiccazione (8)
gallette (9) e tè per cena,
merluzzo in primavera
fritto nel burro rancido.
III
Non voglio il tuo pesce marcio (10)
non va bene per l’inverno
ne posso comprare di meglio
giù a Bonavista.
IV
Ho preso Liza per un giro di danza
il più veloce possibile,
ma ad ogni passo che faceva
si bloccava le ginocchia nella ghiaia(11)
V
Susan White è fuori vista
la sua sottana ha bisogno dell’orlo (12),
il vecchio Sam Oliver al buio
la baciava nell’angolo.

NOTE
1) “I’s the B’y” = I’m the Boy
2) con “fish” a Terranova ci si riferisce al baccalà
3) Liza. Le strofe giocano sul doppio senso di Lisa come donna oppure come il nome di una barca.
4) To hip =to bump someone on the hip when dancing; anche scritto Swing
5) Tibbo sta per Thibeault. I due cognomi ricordano che ci furono coloni francesi e inglesi nella zona in cui ha avuto origine la canzone
6) Fogo, Twillingate, Morton’s (o Moreton’s) Harbour sono villaggi sulle isole al largo delle coste Nord di Terranova, come se formassero le tappe di un percorso circolare che facevano le barche
7) The rindes = strips of birch bark placed on top of the fish to protect them from the sun so they don’t burn, and to keep blow-flies off so they don’t get maggoty. In realtà il cannicciato è posto sotto il pesce messo ad essiccare e le zolle di terra non hanno niente a che vedere con il processo di riparo e di essiccazione. Così alcune versioni riportano la strofa con dei termini comprensibili in inglese standard. In questa strofa era descritto un vecchio modo di lavorazione per essiccare il merluzzo in modo che le mosche non potessero deporre le loro larve e guastare il pesce.
Strofa alternativa:
Flour and crumbs to cover the fish,
Cake and tea for supper,
Cod fish in the spring o’ the year
Fried in rancid butter.
8) flake: una piattaforma costruita su pali per far essiccare il pesce
va7-45The first thing that strikes a stranger on entering a harbour in Newfoundland is the abundance of what are called the fish flakes and stages, together with the wooden wharfs and the great dark red storehouses. The fish flakes consist of a rude platform, raised on slender crossing poles, ten or twelve feet high, with a mating of sticks and boughs for a floor. On these the fish are laid out to dry, and planks are laid down along them in various directions, to enable the persons who have the care of the fish to traverse them…. and in a populous cove or harbour the whole neighbourhood of the houses is surrounded by these flakes, beneath whose umbrageous and odoriferous shade is frequently to be found the only track from one house to the other.” (da Jukes’ Excursions: Being a revised edition of Joseph Beete Jukes’ “Excursions in and about Newfoundland, During the Years 1839 and 1840.” ) Foto: Path under the flakes, La Manche ca. 1938. PANL VA7-45 (PANL-CMCS). tratto da qui
9) cake: le gallette che facevano parte dell’equipaggiamento delle navi al posto del pane
10) magotty fish: pesce marcio infestato dalle larve
11) Gravel= pebble-strewn isthmus. Qui la frase è giocata sul doppio senso: potrebbe trattarsi di Liza che non riesce a saltare bene sulle ginocchia quando danza, ma anche della barca di nome Liza che si arena sulla ghiaia con i fondali bassi
12) come spesso accade nei canti tradizionali i riferimenti sessuali non sono mai espliciti, anche se tutti sanno a cosa si riferisce la frase

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/itb.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/itbgbs2.htm
http://www.joyhecht.net/6-08-15/Aug15-06.html
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/exploration/eyewitness-accounts.php
http://www.therooms.ca/ic_sites/fisheries/main2.asp?frame=off
http://www.veneto.antrocom.org/blog/?p=1731