The Bold Princess Royal

Leggi in Italiano

Ahar, me hearties!” or a narration of the legendary naval pursuit between an british merchant ship and a pirate ship. A popular sea song in the British Isles, America and Canada, which tells of an attempt at pirate attack against the “Princess Royal”; some witnesses claimed it was an event that actually happened, but the dates changed, as did the place of departure and arrival of the vessel. In fact, the name “Princess Royal” was widespread at the time of the great sailing ships and so James Laurenson in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais asserts “This song was written in honour of a Shetland captain, Houston of Otterswick in Yell, who outsailed a pirate in his ship Princess Royal around 1840, and became famous on this account” (from here)
Yet already in 1905 George Gardiner had brought back a testimony of the attack between the “Princess Royal” and the French corsair ship “The Adventure” which occurred in 1789 which it was then widely disseminated in numerous boadside between the mid and late 1800s.
At daybreak on 21 June 1789, HM packet Princess Royal, nine days out from Falmouth on her way to New York (other accounts say Halifax) carrying mail, was accosted and pursued by a brig which was later identified as the French privateer Aventurier. At 7 pm the Aventurier hoisted English colours and fired a shot, which the Princess Royal returned. After a further shot, the brig continued the pursuit. It was not until 3.30 am on 22 June that the Aventurier resumed its attack, this time with a broadside and musket fire. The Princess Royal was outmanned, with a crew of thirty-two men and boys with seventeen passengers as opposed to the Aventurier’s 85 men and boys; and out-gunned too, with six cannons against the brig’s sixteen. Nevertheless, the English ship gave a good account of herself, holding the privateer off for two hours; at the end of which time the Aventurier moved away, sustaining further damage to her stern. The French ship was obliged to return to Bordeaux for refitting, while the Princess Royal resumed her course, eventually arriving home on 31 October. (from here)
Combined with different melodies, the standard version of “The Bold Princess Royal” follows a melody collected in South East England by Vaughan Williams that he reported in his “Folk Songs from the Eastern Counties” (1908)
Luke Kelly

Mary Black from General Humbert, 1976  (text here)

Chris Foster from Traces, 1999 (who learned it from the version recorded in 1938 by Velvet Brightwell, a traditional Suffolk singer, born in 1865)

Luke Kelly version
I
On the fifthteenth of February
we sailed from the land
On the bold Princess Royal
bound for Newfoundland.
We had fifhty brave seamen
for ship’s company
as boldly (bound) from the eastward
to the westward sailed we.
II
We had not been sailing
scarce days two or three,
When the man from our masthead
a strange sails he did see.
She came bearing down on us
for to see what we were
And under her mizzen black colours she wore.
III
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“What shall we do now? (1)
Here comes a bold pirate
to rob us, I know.”
“Oh no!” cries the chief mate,
“That never shall be so.
We’ll let out our reef 2), boys,
and from him we’ll go”
IV
Well this so bold pirate,
he hove alongside,
With a loud-speaking trumpet (3),
“Whence come you?” he cried,
Our captain being up, my boys,
he answered him so:
“We come from fair London;
and we’re bound for Peru(4).”
V
“Come, heave up your courses
and bring your ship to (5)
I have a long letter
to send home by you.”
“Oh, I will not heave up my courses
nor bring my ship to
That will be in some harbour,
not alongside of you.”
VI
And he chased us to the windward
to all that long day.
He fired shots after us
but they could not make way.
He fired shots after us
but none could prevail
And the bold Princess Royal
soon show them her tail.
VII
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“Now the pirate is gone,
Go you down to your grog (6), my boys, go down, everyone.
go you down to your grog, my boys,
and be of good cheer,
While the Princess has sea-room,
brave boys, never fear.”

NOTES
1) a sentence typicall from the commedia dell’arte
2) the first rule at sea: if you see a pirate ship, run away quickly. In fact it was the diversionary maneuvers performed by the few sailors on board to save their ship from the boarding! Fear of pirates cruelity played in their favor, many crews preferred to surrender without fighting, hoping to obtain clemency.
3) In the third volume of the series of Monaldi & Sorti entitled “Mysterium” they describes a boarding at the end of 600 by barbarian pirates: the blare of trumpets was a customary signal of the Dutch to greet the other ships at sea. The strange thing in this ballad is that the pirate ship already beat the black flag: it would have been more logical that at first they showed a “camouflage” flag to make sure that the other ship was approached without suspicion and only later replace the first flag with the pirate one.
4) Point of departure and arrival of the vessel changes according to the versions, Mary Black says Callao, Chris Foster says Kero, Luis Killen Peru. But also St. John pheraps Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova, although there is a Caribbean St. John
5) inexistent request to join the ship is a clumsy attempt to approach the ship without resorting to the fire of guns.
6) Grog is a drink introduced in the Royal Navy in 1740: rum after the British conquest of Jamaica had become the favorite drink of sailors, but to avoid problems during navigation, the daily ration of rum was diluted with water. (see more)

Princess Royal tune

Princess Royal is also the title of a melody attributed by collector Edward Bunting to the irish harper O’Carolan, (in The Ancient Music of Ireland, 1840), with the note “composed by Carolan for the daughter of MacDermott Roe, the representative of the old princes of Coolavin.”), the air has become a popular Morris dance

Elisabeth Brogeby



LINK
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-bold-princess-royal-song-lyrics-and-guitar-chords.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/theboldprincessroyal.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/proyal.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/boldprin.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/67959/10
https://www.loc.gov/item/afc1939007_afs02274b/
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118497

https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Princess_Royal_(1)_(The)
https://thesession.org/tunes/7267

Sunfair and the Dragon King

Leggi in Italiano

Solfager og Ormekongen (Sunfair and the Dragon King) is a very old Norwegian ballad, which became popular in the musical arrangement by Edvard Grieg (Norwegian Dances and Songs, op 17 -1870), a kilomentric ballad in an archaic Norwegian translated into English by Christopher Norman [Ragnar Christophersen](in Norway Sings – A Collection of Norwegian Folk Songs, Norsk Musikkforlag, 1940). The ballad is widespread in Sweden under the title Jungfru Solfager.

Arthur Rackham: Siegfried And The Twilight Of The Gods

The ballad is part of a chivalrous genre that portrays the medieval nobility by showing its drives and dramas; they are mostly tragic love songs, but also they talk about murky passions and domestic violence, infidelity and passional crimes.
The plot is as follows: King David leaves his betrothed Sunfair to travel abroad. While he is away his brother Ormekongen (the Dragon King), tries to seduce Sunfair. She resists and the Dragon King gives her a potion to make her lose consciousness. He then buries her apparently dead body, but later steals her secretly from the grave and leaves the country with her. King David follows disguised as a pilgrim. He reveals himself to Sunfair and brings her back home again. (from here)

Jean-Luc Lenoir from “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2012 (Joanne McIver voice) 

I
The King of the Dragons (1) came
a riding on his mare,
And the maiden was so young.
Sunfair stood waiting
and sunned her golden hair.
I love to ride out in the meadows.
II
And do you hear, my Sunfair,
what I order thee?
Thou’lt leave King David
and be betrothed to me.
III
Never shall it come to pass
while I do live,
That I two brothers
should my pledge give.
IV
Three magic potions in her cup
he went and poured;
Sunfair drank and swoon’d
without a word.
V
To King David came the message
sinister and dread!
Sunfair, your love,
your sweetheart, is dead!

NOTES
1) In knightly ballads all knights are identified with symbols that characterize their good or bad nature, in general marked by colors (Green Knight, Red Knight, Black Knight) but here the evil one is the king’s brother: “ormr” in Old Norse means “snake”, a legendary serpentiform creature symbol of war and pestilence, a dragon-snake able to take human form, and yet in this context the dragon king is probably a name that indicates his ruthlessness and resoluteness in the battle. The term dragon for an armed infantry unit armed with arquebus (sputafuoco) dates back to the fifteenth century

Solfager and the Snake King, Op. 17 No. 12 (Edvard Grieg)

Bruno Vlahek

Håvard Gimse

Ellen Bødtker from Villveng 2017

LINK
http://tredwellsmusic.com/norway-sings-a-collection-of-norwegian-folk-music-songbook-sheet-music-out-of-print
http://www.visearkivet.no/pdf_filer/diverse_artikler/english/all_for_his_maiden_fair.pdf
http://www.bokselskap.no/boker/fagartiklarogtittelregister/espeland2
https://wunderkammern.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/le-ballate-norvegesi-i/
http://www.listento.no/mic.nsf/doc/art2002092015093372007782

Solfager og Ormekongen

Read the post in English

Solfager og Ormekongen (Sunfair and the Dragon King) è una ballata norvegese molto antica, diventata popolare nell’arrangiamento per piano di Edvard Grieg (Danze e canti norvegesi, op. 17 -1870), una ballata kilomentrica in un norvegese arcaico tradotta in inglese da Christopher Norman [Ragnar Christophersen] (in Norway Sings – A Collection of Norwegian Folk Songs, Norsk Musikkforlag, 1940). La ballata è diffusa in Svezia con il titolo Jungfru Solfager.

Arthur Rackham: Siegfried And The Twilight Of The Gods

La ballata si colloca nell’ambito cavalleresco un genere che ritrae la nobiltà medievale mostrandone pulsioni e drammi; sono per lo più tragiche canzoni d’amore, ma anche di torbide passioni e violenze domestiche, infedeltà e crimini passionali.
La sinossi della trama è la seguente: il re David lascia la sua promessa sposa Sunfair per viaggiare all’estero. Mentre è via suo fratello Ormekongen (il Re Dragone) cerca di sedurre Sunfair. Lei resiste ed il Re Dragone le dà una pozione per farle perdere i sensi, poi seppellisce il suo corpo apparentemente senza vita, e successivamente la rapisce in segreto dalla tomba e lascia il paese con lei. Il re Davide lo segue travestito da pellegrino. Si rivela a Sunfair e la riporta a casa. (tratto da qui)

Jean-Luc Lenoir in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2012 (voce Joanne McIver) 

I
The King of the Dragons (1) came
a riding on his mare,
And the maiden was so young.
Sunfair stood waiting
and sunned her golden hair.
I love to ride out in the meadows.
II
And do you hear, my Sunfair,
what I order thee?
Thou’lt leave King David
and be betrothed to me.
III
Never shall it come to pass
while I do live,
That I two brothers
should my pledge give.
IV
Three magic potions in her cup
he went and poured;
Sunfair drank and swoon’d
without a word.
V
To King David came the message
sinister and dread!
Sunfair, your love,
your sweetheart, is dead!
Traduzione italiana
I
Il Re dei Dragoni giunse
a cavallo della sua giumenta
e la fanciulla era tanto giovane.
Bel Sole era lì in attesa
ad asciugare al sole i suoi capelli d’oro.
Adoro passeggiare per i prati.
II
“E tu senti, mia Bel Sole,
cosa ti ordino?
Tu lascerai re Davide
e sarai la mia promessa.”
III
“Mai accadrà
fin quando vivo
che io a due fratelli
faccia il mio voto nunziale.”
IV
Egli giunse e tre pozioni magiche
versò nella sua coppa;
Bel Sole bevve e svenne
senza una parola.
V
A Re Davide giunse la notizia
sinistra e terribile!
Bel Sole, il tuo amore,
il tuo tesoro, è morta!

NOTE
* traduzione tratta da qui
1) nelle ballate cavalleresche i cavalieri sono identificati con simboli che caratterizzano la loro natura buona o cattiva, in genere si fa ricorso ai colori (Cavaliere Verde, Cavaliere Rosso, Cavaliere Nero) ma qui il malvagio è il fratello del re: “ormr” in norreno antico significa “serpente”, una leggendaria creatura serpentiforme simbolo di guerra e pestilenza, un drago-serpente in grado di prendere forma umana, e tuttavia in questo contesto il re dragone è probabilmente un appellativo che ne indica la spietatezza e risolutezza nella battaglia. Il termine dragone per indicare un’unità di fanteria a cavallo armati di archibugio (sputafuoco) risale al XV secolo

Solfager and the Snake King, Op. 17 No. 12 (Edvard Grieg)

Bruno Vlahek

Håvard Gimse

Ellen Bødtker in Villveng 2017

FONTI
http://tredwellsmusic.com/norway-sings-a-collection-of-norwegian-folk-music-songbook-sheet-music-out-of-print
http://www.visearkivet.no/pdf_filer/diverse_artikler/english/all_for_his_maiden_fair.pdf
http://www.bokselskap.no/boker/fagartiklarogtittelregister/espeland2
https://wunderkammern.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/le-ballate-norvegesi-i/
http://www.listento.no/mic.nsf/doc/art2002092015093372007782

The Saucy Sailor Boy

Leggi in italiano

The nineteenth-century image of sailor is rather stereotypical: Jack Tar is a drunkard and a womanizer, perhaps a slacker and troublemaker, always ready to fight.
In sea songs from the female point of view sailor is often an unfaithful liar who has a girlfriend in every port even if he has a wife and children at home. Ridiculed and rejected by some, he is instead sought by others who absolutely prefer the love of a sailor (Sailor laddie)!
Sailor is watched more often with distrust by women, as in the sea song entitled “The Saucy Sailor Boy” where a young “saucy” sailor courts a country girl: it’s a “love contrast” that fits in a long popular tradition of bucolic argument, in which a man and a woman duet with amorous skirmishes; generally woman refuses man’s proposals, to preserve her virtue or to better stimulate his desire; man, on the other hand, promises seas and mountains, as well as eternal love, riches and the certainty of a comfortable life, just to conquer the woman’s graces.
In Saucy Sailor, however, she rejects the sailor with ill grace, because his clothes still smell of tar; the music changes when sailor shows his money but it’s too late and sailor doesn’ t want  to marry her anymore!

SAILOR’S CLOTHES

Clothes of Poor Jack, a British sailor of the late eighteenth century, are anything but poor: he is wearing a popular variant of the knee-length trousers, a sort of very wide trouser skirt. He wears a black tall round hat, and his long hair is loose on his neck, a white shirt with a stiff collar and a red neckcloth; characteristic yellow double-breasted waistcoat with narrow vertical red stripes, and an elegant blue short jacket with a long row of white buttons; light blue socks and black shoes with a beautiful metal buckles.

Poor Jack, Charles Dibdin, 1790-1791, British Museum: he wears slops, wide knee-length pants. The hair worn long until the mid-nineteenth century were kept in order, stopping them behind the back of the neck in a tarred tail, hence the nickname Jack Tar

But sailors like all the workers and men of the people also wore long trousers which became a standard of men’s clothing after the French revolution.

THE SAUCY SAILOR BOY

Text is found in many nineteenth-century collections and broadside especially in Great Britain and America, and probably it has eighteenth-century origins (William Alexander Barret in his “English Folksong” published in 1891 believes that this song appeared in print in 1781 and he cites its great popularity among girls who work in Eastern London factories.
The Tarry Sailor from trad archives (Andrew Robbie of Strichen, Aberdeenshire)  
Quadriga consort: early-music version
Harbottle & Jonas (from Cornwall): a swing version

Steeleye Span from Below the Salt, 1972 ( I, and from III to VIII): standard version in the repertoires of singers and folk groups

Wailin Jennys 

SAUCY SAILOR BOY
I
“Come, my dearest, come, my fairest,
Come and tell unto me,
Will you pity (fancy) a poor sailor boy,
Who has just come from sea?”
II
“I can fancy no poor sailor:
No poor sailor for me!
For to cross the wide ocean
Is a terror to me.
III
You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love,/And your clothes they smell of tar./So begone, you saucy sailor boy,
So begone, you Jack Tar(1)!”
IV
“If I’m ragged, love, if I’m dirty, love,
If my clothes they smell (much) of tar,
I have silver in my pocket, love,
And of gold a bright (great) store.”
V (2)
When she heard those words come from him, On her bended knees she fell./”To be sure, I’ll wed my sailor,
For I love him so well.”
VI
“Do you think that I am foolish?
Do you think that I am mad?
That I’d wed with a poor country girl
Where no fortune’s to be had?
VII
I will cross the briny ocean/Where the meadows they are green (3);
Since you have had the offer, love,
Another shall have the ring.
VIII
For I’m young, love, and I’m frolicksome, (4)
I’m good-temper’d, kind and free.
And I don’t care a straw (5), love,
What the world says (thinks)of me.

NOTES
1) Jack Tar is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. Seamen were known to ‘tar’ their clothes before departing on voyages, in order to make them waterproof, in the eighteenth century they were usually used to tar their long hair in a ponytail to prevent it from getting wet or that the wind ruffled it
2)  Steeleye Span :
And then when she heard him say so
On her bended knees she fell,
“I will marry my dear Henry
For I love a sailor lad so well.”
3) Steeleye Span: I will whistle and sing
4) Steeleye Span :
Oh, I am frolicsome and I am easy,
Good tempered and free,
5) or “I don’t give a single pin”

SEA SHANTY VERSION: The Tarry Sailor

Stan Hugill in his Shantyman Bible (Shanties from the Seven Seas) tells us that The Tarry Sailor (Saucy Sailor Boy) in addition to being a forebitter song was occasionally sung during the boring hours of pumping water from the bilge when the pumps were operated by hand!  (see sea shanty)

Hulton Clint 

THE TARRY SAILOR
I
Come on my fair ones,
Come on my fan ones,
Come and listen unto me.
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
II
No, indeed, I’ll wed no sailor
For they smell too much of tar!
You are ruggy, you are sassy,
get you gone Jackie Tar.
III
I have ship on all the ocean,
I have golden great galore
All my clothes they may be all in rags,
but coin can buy me more
IV
If I am ruggy, if I am sassy
And may by a tarry smell
I had silver in my pockets
For they knew can every tell
V
When she heard him that distressed
down upon her knees she fell
Saying “Ruggy dirty saylor boy
I love more than you can tell”
VI
Do you think that I’m foolish,
Do you think that I’m mad?
That I’d wed the likes of you, Miss,
When there’s others to be had!”
VII
No indeed I’ll cross the ocean,
And my ships shall spread her wings,
You refused me, ragged, dirty,
Not for you the wedding ring.

Scottish sailors were excellent dancers and part of their training consisted of practicing Sailor’s Hornpipe


second part

LINK
https://www.britishtars.com/2014/01/poor-jack-1790-91.html
https://www.mun.ca/mha/mlc/articles/introducing-merchant-seafaring/jack-tar.php
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saucysailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=133473
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16440

Freedom Come All Ye & Battle of the Somme

Leggi in italiano

Freedom Come-All-Ye is a song written by Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) in 1960 for the Peace March in Holy Loch, near Glasgow, it is a song against the war, a cry for freedom against slavery and against the oppression of the working class and ethnic minorities, in the name of social justice. The song is in scots, while the melody is a retreat march for bagpipes from the First World War, arranged by John MacLellan (1875-1949) who titled it “The Bloody Fields of Flanders”; Henderson first heard played on the Anzio beachhead in 1944 (Second World War).The melody however is an old Perthshire aria already known with the title of “Busk Bush Bonnie Lassie

Dick Gaughan

Lorraine McIntosh live –
Luke Kelly

 


I
Roch the wind in the clear day’s dawin
Blaws the cloods heilster-gowdie owre the bay
But there’s mair nor a roch wind blawin (1)
Thro the Great Glen o the warld the day
It’s a thocht that wad gar oor rottans
Aa thae rogues that gang gallus fresh an gay
Tak the road an seek ither loanins
Wi thair ill-ploys tae sport an play
II
Nae mair will our bonnie callants
Merch tae war when oor braggarts crousely craw (2)
Nor wee weans frae pitheid an clachan
Mourn the ships sailin doun the Broomielaw (3)
Broken faimlies in lands we’ve hairriet
Will curse ‘Scotlan the Brave’ nae mair, nae mair
Black an white ane-til-ither mairriet
Mak the vile barracks o thair maisters (4) bare
III
Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom
Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom (5)
In yer hoos aa the bairns o Adam
Will find breid, barley-bree an paintit rooms
When Maclean (6) meets wi’s friens in Springburn (7)
Aa thae roses an geans will turn tae blume (8)
An the black lad frae yont Nyanga (9)
Dings the fell gallows o the burghers doun.
English translation*
I
It’s a rough wind in the clear day’s dawning
Blows the clouds head-over-heels across the bay
But there’s more than a rough wind blowing
Through the Great Glen of the world today
It’s a thought that would make our rodents,
All those rogues who strut and swagger,
Take the road and seek other pastures
To carry out their wicked schemes
II
No more will our fine young men
March to war at the behest of jingoists and imperialists
Nor will young children from mining communities and rural hamlets
Mourn the ships sailing off down the River Clyde
Broken families in lands we’ve helped to oppress
Will never again have reason to curse the sound of advancing Scots
Black and white, united in friendship and marriage,
Will make the slums of the employers bare
III
So come all ye who love freedom
Pay no attention to the prophets of doom
In your house all the children of Adam
Will be welcomed with food, drink and clean bright accommodation
When MacLean returns to his people
All the roses and cherry trees will blossom
And the black guy from Nyanga
Will break the capitalist stranglehold on everyone’s life

NOTES
* from here
1) a wind of change is a metaphor dear to the political world, it is the wind of people protest, who claim their right to live a full and dignified life
2) are those who rant and foment the war to push the sons of the people forward
3) Glasgow’s main thoroughfare adjacent to the river Clyde: it is the pier from which many ships loaded with emigrants have left
4) the reference is to apartheid in South Africa when the blacks were deported to the “homeland of the south” and deprived of all political and civil rights.
5) In those years peace meant to protest against the atomic arms race and the fear of a nuclear conflict: the sign of peace that today belongs to the symbols shared on a global level was created in 1958 by the Englishman Gerald Holtom for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, CND: as he himself declared, the three lines are the superposition of the letters N and D – which stand for Nuclear Disarmament – taken from the semaphore alphabet. The circle, on the other hand, symbolizes the Earth.

6) John Maclean (1879 -1923), Scottish socialist, known for his fierce opposition to the First World War. For this reason, in 1918 he was tried for sedition and imprisoned. There was a popular mobilization in his favor and a few months later he was released. In 1918 he ended up again in prison for obstruction to recruitment and sedition and he was released after 7 months; the months in jail have harmed the health of Maclean who will die at age 45; his communism evolved against the Scottish Labor parties to advocate Scotland’s independence and the return to the old social clan structure but on a communist basis
7) district of the working class of Glasgow. The south of Scotland heavily idustrialized from the second half of the 1800 transform Glasgow and the Clyde into a bulwark of radical socialists and communists so much to get the nickname “Red Clyde”
8) spring is the season of rebirth
-) Nyanga is a city in Cape Town, South Africa. The residents of Nyanga have been very active in protesting the laws of apartheid

The Battle of the Somme

Another bagpipe melody from World War I was composed by piper William Laurie (1881-1916) to commemorate one of the deadliest battles, the Battle of the Somme which began July 1916 with heavy losses from day one; in the end it will result 620.000 losses among the Allies and about 450.000 among the German rows: the melody is in 9/8 and it is considered a retreat march, not necessarily as a specific military maneuver. Laurie (or Lawrie) participated in the battle with the 8th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Lawrie and John MacLellan served in the same band during the war), but severely tried by the wounds and life in the trench fell seriously ill and he was repatriated England where he died in November of the same year.

The Dubliners often with “Freedom Come-All-Ye”

The Malinky with Jimmy Waddel (at 3:39)

It was Dave Swarbrick who brought the piece to the Fireport Convention group after learning it from his friend and teacher Beryl Marriott

Albion Country Band

THE DANCE

A Scottish dance entitled The Scottish Lilt was composed shortly after 1746 to be practiced by ladies of good family who wished to court or entertain the gentlemen seducing them with their grace. It’s a Scottish National Dances traditionally matched with the melody The Battle of the Somme: the dance moves are inspired by the classical ballet


the steps in detail

LINK
http://unionsong.com/u597.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=13463
http://www.andreagaddini.it/FreedomCamAllYe.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/f/freedomc.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4996
https://www.wired.it/play/cultura/2014/02/21/nascita-simbolo-pace/
http://thebattleofthefield.tripod.com/id11.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/2923

Freedom Come All Ye

Read the post in English

Scritta nel 1960 da Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) per la Marcia della Pace a Holy Loch, presso Glasgow, “Freedom Come-All-Ye”  è una canzone contro la guerra, un grido di libertà contro la schiavitù e contro l’oppressione della classe lavoratrice e delle minoranze etniche, in nome della giustizia sociale. La canzone è in scots, mentre la melodia è una marcia da ritirata per cornamusa della prima guerra mondiale, arrangiata da John MacLellan (1875-1949) che la intitolò “The Bloody Fields of Flanders”;  Henderson ebbe modo di ascoltarla nel 1944 durante la seconda guerra mondiale mentre combatteva ad Anzio. La melodia tuttavia è una vecchia aria del Perthshire già nota con il titolo di “Busk Bush Bonnie Lassie

Dick Gaughan

Lorraine McIntosh live –
Luke Kelly

 


I
Roch the wind in the clear day’s dawin
Blaws the cloods heilster-gowdie owre the bay
But there’s mair nor a roch wind blawin (1)
Thro the Great Glen o the warld the day
It’s a thocht that wad gar oor rottans
Aa thae rogues that gang gallus fresh an gay
Tak the road an seek ither loanins
Wi thair ill-ploys tae sport an play
II
Nae mair will our bonnie callants
Merch tae war when oor braggarts crousely craw (2)
Nor wee weans frae pitheid an clachan
Mourn the ships sailin doun the Broomielaw (3)
Broken faimlies in lands we’ve hairriet
Will curse ‘Scotlan the Brave’ nae mair, nae mair
Black an white ane-til-ither mairriet
Mak the vile barracks o thair maisters (4) bare
III
Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom
Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom (5)
In yer hoos aa the bairns o Adam
Will find breid, barley-bree an paintit rooms
When Maclean (6) meets wi’s friens in Springburn (7)
Aa thae roses an geans will turn tae blume (8)
An the black lad frae yont Nyanga (9)
Dings the fell gallows o the burghers doun.
Traduzione italiana di Carla Sassi*
I
Forte il vento nell’alba del giorno chiaro/Sovverte le nuvole via per la baia,
Ma non v’è più il vento forte che soffiava
Attraverso la grande valle del mondo.
E’ un pensiero che invoglia i nostri ratti,/I briganti che infieriscono felici e intatti,
A prendere il cammino, in cerca di luoghi nuovi/Dove godere e giocare malvagi inganni.
II
Mai più la dolce gioventù dovrà
Marciare in guerra mentre i pavidi si vantano rauchi
Né i piccoli figli della miniera e del villaggio
Piangeranno le navi che salpano via dal Broomielaw.
Famiglie divise in terre da noi razziate
Non malediranno la Scozia guerriera, mai più;
Il nero e il bianco, l’uno all’altro uniti nell’amore,
Lasceranno deserte le vili caserme dei padroni.
III
Qui venite tutti, alla casa della libertà,
Non ascoltate i corvi che invocano rauchi la fine
Nella tua casa ogni figlio di Adamo
Troverà pane e birra e mura imbiancate.
E quando John MacLean si unirà ai compagni di Springburn
Tutte le rose ed i ciliegi fioriranno,
E un fanciullo nero dal lontano Nyanga
Frantumerà le forche feroci della città.

NOTE
* (dal libro “Poeti della Scozia contemporanea” a cura di Carla Sassi e Marco Fazzini, Supernova Editore, Venezia 1992)
1) il vento del cambiamente una metafora cara al mondo politico, è il vento di protesta del popolo che rivendita il suo diritto a vivere una vita piena e dignitosa
2) sono quelli che sbraitano e fomentano la guerra a mandare avanti in prima linea i figli del popolo
3) principale arteria di Glasgow adiacente al fiume Clyde: è il molo da cui sono partite tante navi carichi di emigranti
4) il riferimento è all’apartheid in Sud Africa quando i neri vennero deportati nelle “homeland del sud” e privati di ogni diritto politico e civile.
5) Non dimentichiamo che in quegli anni la pace voleva dire protestare contro la corsa all’armamento atomico e la paura di un conflitto nucleare: il segno di pace che oggi appartiene ai simboli condivisi a livello globale fu creato nel 1958 dall’inglese Gerald Holtom per La Campagna per il disarmo nucleare (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, CND) : come dichiarò lui stesso, le tre linee sono la sovrapposizione delle lettere N e D – che stanno per Nuclear Disarmament – prese dall’ alfabeto semaforico. Il cerchio, invece, simboleggia la Terra.

6) John Maclean (1879 –1923), socialista scozzese, noto per la sua fiera opposizione alla prima guerra mondiale. Per questo nel 1918 fu processato per sedizione e imprigionato. Ci fu una mobilitazione popolare in suo favore e qualche mese dopo venne scarcerato. Ancora nel 1918 finì di nuovo in prigione per ostruzione al reclutamento e sedizione e di nuovo scarcerato dopo 7 mesi; i mesi in carcere hanno nuociuto alla salute di Maclean che morirà a 45 anni; il suo comunismo finì per discostarsi dai partiti laburisti scozzesi per propugnare l’indipendenza della Scozia e il ritorno all’antica struttura sociale dei clan ma su base comunista
6) quartiere della classe lavoratrice di Glasgow. Il sud della Scozia pesantemente idustrializzato a partire dalla seconda metà del 1800 trasformano Glasgow e il Clyde in un baluardo di socialisti radicali e comunisti tanto da ottenere il soprannome di “Clyde Rosso”
7) è la primavera la stagione della rinascita
8) Nyanga è una città a Città del Capo , in Sud Africa . I residenti di Nyanga sono stati molto attivi nella protesta contro le leggi dell’apartheid

The Battle of the Somme

Un’altra melodia per cornamusa sempre riconducibile alla I Guerra Mondiale, fu composta dal piper William Laurie (1881-1916) per commemorare una delle battaglie più letali, la battaglia della Somme (The Battle of the Somme) che iniziò il1 luglio 1916 con pesanti perdite fin dal primo giorno; alla fine risulteranno 620.000 perdite tra gli Alleati e circa 450.000 tra le file tedesche: la melodia è in 9/8 ed è considerata una marcia da ritirata, non necessariamente come specifica manovra militare. Laurie (o Lawrie) partecipò alla battaglia con l’8° Battaglione Argyll e Sutherland Highlanders (Lawrie e John MacLellan prestarono servizio nella stessa banda durante la guerra), ma duramente provato dalle ferite e dalla vita in trincea si ammalò gravemente e venne rimpatriato in Inghilterra dove morì nel novembre dello stesso anno.

I Dubliners spesso abbinata a “Freedom Come-All-Ye”

I Malinky la abbinano a Jimmy Waddel (inizia a 3:39)

Fu Dave Swarbrick a portare il pezzo nel gruppo Fireport Convention dopo averlo imparato dal suo amico e insegnante Beryl Marriott

Albion Country Band

LA DANZA

Una danza scozzese dal titolo The Scottish Lilt fu composta poco dopo il 1746 per essere praticata dalle madamigelle di buona famiglia che desideravano corteggiare o intrattenere i membri della nobiltà seducendoli con la loro grazia. E’ una Scottish  National Dances abbinata tradizionalmente  alla melodia The Battle of the Somme: i passi di danza sono ispirati al balletto classico

anche con due uomini

i passi nel dettaglio

FONTI
http://unionsong.com/u597.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=13463
http://www.andreagaddini.it/FreedomCamAllYe.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/f/freedomc.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4996
https://www.wired.it/play/cultura/2014/02/21/nascita-simbolo-pace/
http://thebattleofthefield.tripod.com/id11.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/2923

Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie

Leggi in italiano

“Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie” (or “Bonnie Glenshee”) is a scottis traditional song great favourite with Scots Travellers, from an old Perthshire tune, with little concrete information about it . The lyrics inserts in the common theme of the girls who would like to follow their love enlisted as a soldier (or sailor) disguised as a man to stay beside him, but they are dissuaded to remain at home. MacColl and Seeger included  “Busk,Busk, Bonnie Lassie” (“Bonnie Glen Shee”) in Travellers Songs from England and Scotland, 1977, as sung by Charlotte Higgins. They say: “This piece does not appear in any of the major Scots collections. It is a kind of mirror-image of ‘O No, No’, a song of the ‘Lisbon / banks of the Nile’ genre, in which a girl’s plea that she should be allowed to accompany her lover to war is rejected on the grounds that her beauty would fade and her colour stain when exposed to the frost and rain of the highlands.” (from Charlotte Higgins see more)

Here the boy invites his girlfriend to a last romantic walk (probably a love meeting with exchange of votes) for Glen Isla before leaving the war.

Shona Anderson & Terry Dey

The Corries — Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie


I
Do you see yon high hills (1)
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Chorus
Busk, busk, bonny lassie
And come alang wi me
And I’ll tak ye tae Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon (bonny) shepherds,
As they walk alang
Wi their plaidies pulled aboot them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon  (bonny) sodjers
As they all march alang
Wi their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging doon
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
English translation Cattia Salto
I
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They have parted many’s a true love
And they’ll soon part us two
Chorus
Get ready get ready bonny lassie
And come along with me
And I’ll take you to Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon shepherds,
As they walk along
With their plaidies pulled about them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon sodjers
As they all march along
With their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging down
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They have parted many’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us two

NOTES
1) or bonny highland

The Bloody Fields of Flanders

The pipe march version comes from the World War I arranged by John MacLellan (Pipe Major of the 8th Argylls), Hamish Henderson had the chance to hear it during the Second World War at Anzio and in 1960 he added a text entitled “The Freedom Come-All-Ye” by tranforming it into an anti-war song.


A Trip

https://outnaboutinscotland.com/2014/11/24/glen-isla-monamenach/

LINK
http://sangstories.webs.com/bonnyglenshee.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/81881/16
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/10596/1
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/65221/1
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/871.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4991
http://www.schoolofpiping.com/articles/flanders.pdf

Bonnie Glenshee

Read the post in English

“Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie” (anche “Bonnie Glenshee”) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese diffusa tra gli Scots Travellers, su di una vecchia melodia del Perthsire, una canzone di cui non si sa praticamente nulla. S’inserisce nel filone delle fanciulle che vorrebbero seguire il loro amore arruolato come soldato (o marinaio) travestendosi da uomo per restargli accanto, ma sono dissuase a restare a casa. Nelle note di copertina de Travellers Songs from England and Scotland, 1977 MacColl and Seeger  scrivono: “
Questo pezzo non appare in nessuna delle principali collezioni scozzesi. È una specie di immagine speculare di “O No, No”, una canzone del genere “Lisbona / banche del Nilo”, in cui una ragazza supplica il suo amore per accompagnarlo in guerra, ma la sua richiesta viene respinta con il pretesto che la sua bellezza svanirebbe e il suo incarnato patirebbe se esposto al gelo e alla pioggia degli altipiani” (dalla testimoniana di Charlotte Higgins vedi)

Qui il ragazzo invita la fidanzata a ad un’ultima romantica passeggiata (probabilmente un incontro amoroso con scambio di voti ) per la Glen Isla prima di partire in guerra.

Shona Anderson & Terry Dey

The Corries — Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie


I
Do you see yon high hills (1)
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Chorus
Busk, busk, bonny lassie
And come alang wi me
And I’ll tak ye tae Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon (bonny) shepherds,
As they walk alang
Wi their plaidies pulled aboot them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon  (bonny) sodjers
As they all march alang
Wi their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging doon
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Vedi le alte colline
ricoperte di neve
Hanno separato più di un vero amore
e presto ci divideranno
Coro
Preparati, preparati bella fanciulla
e vieni con me
e ti porterò a Glen Isla
vicino alle bella Glen Shee.
II
Vedi quei pastori
che camminano
con i loro mantelli stretti addosso
e le loro pecore che pascolano
III
Vedi quei soldati
mentre camminano tutti insieme
con i moschetti sulle spalle
e i loro spadoni che penzolano al fianco
IV
Vedi le alte colline
ricoperte di neve
Hanno separato più di un vero amore
e presto ci divideranno

NOTE
1) oppure bonny highland

LA MELODIA:The Bloody Fields of Flanders

La versione pipe march viene dalla I Guerra Mondiale arrangiata da John MacLellan (Pipe Major dell’8° Argylls), Hamish Henderson ebbe l’occasione di sentirla durante la II Guerra Mondiale ad Anzio e nel 1960 ci aggiunge un testo dal titolo ‘The Freedom Come-All-Ye’ trasformandola in una anti-war song.


L’escursione
https://outnaboutinscotland.com/2014/11/24/glen-isla-monamenach/

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/bonnyglenshee.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/81881/16
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/10596/1
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/65221/1
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/871.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4991
http://www.schoolofpiping.com/articles/flanders.pdf

Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

Leggi in Italiano

Entitled “Jolly Roving Tar” but more frequently “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” here is a forebitter song that ironizes on the idle occupations of a sailor when he is ashore.
For my money’s gone,” says the sailor who is well liked and fondled by the ladies when his pockets are full, but immediately put aside for another sailor when the money ends!

A similar song (we do not know if original or a traditional version rewriting) was written in New York in 1885 by Ed Harrigan & David Braham for the music hall entitled ‘Old Lavender‘ (text and score here); a version published by John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” was attributed to John Thomas, a Welsh sailor who was on “the Philadelphian” in 1896. (text here), but the main source of the best known variant comes from “Grammy” Fish .

“GRAMMY” FISH

Mrs. Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) spent the first 24 years of her life in Black Brook, NY, not far from the Canadian border. Lena’s main source of songs was her own family, the Bourne; his ancestors were the first settlers of Cape Cod and a lot of songs (with many English and Irish traditional tunes) had passed to the family generations since emigration . As a lumber trader, her father  collected many songs from the people he met in the New England woods in his travels.
Once married, Lena moved to Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Two collectors of traditional songs (Helen Harkness Flanders and Marguerite Olney) interviewed her in 1940 and recorded about 175 songs; the following year Anne and Frank Warner collected a hundred songs in four recording sessions half of which completly new ones.
“Grammy” Fish had taken her role as a witness of the past to heart so as to transcribe the “old songs” in many notebooks to leave them to the new generations.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live

I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…

NOTES
1) grog= drink
2) Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  or “He then will sail aboard some ship
4)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes. (the eight bells were ringed at 4, at 8, at 12, at 16, at 20 and at midnight). An hourglass was used to calculate the time.

Great Big Sea from Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.

I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!

NOTES
3) meaning that he will not offend the innkeeper with a refusal
4) Placentia is a small Canadian city formed by the union of the villages of Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville and Argentia .
5)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes.

ENGLISH VERSION

In the nineteenth century there was a completely different version in which poor Susan was distraught because the fine William was still far from the sea, she decided to follow him as a sailor. The version is still popular in Newfoundland. As much as I searched the web at the moment I did not find a video to listen to.
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

Jolly Roving Tar by “Irish Rovers”

The text was written by George Millar the founder of the “Irish Rovers” and although a different song borrows some phrases from “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” other equally famous sea songs on sailors.
The Irish Rover from Another Round 2005: various dances taken from fantasy films and animations

I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

Báidín Fheidhlimidh

Leggi in Italiano

The island of Tory or better Oileán Thoraigh, is a grain of rice (measuring 5 km in length and 1 in width) 12 km off the northern coast of Donegal. Ancient fortress of the Fomorians that from here left to raid the coasts of Ireland, a race of primordial gods, like Balor of the Evil Eye, the Celtic god of darkness that had only one eye on the back of the head.
It is called the island of artists since a small community of painters has been established in the 1950s. The hundreds of people who live there are Gaelic speakers and have been “governed” since the Middle Ages by a king of the island: it is up to the king to explain the legends and traditions of the island to the tourists!

TORAIG~1
island of Tory
by Pixdaus 

Bright and verdant in summer it is flagellate from strong storms in the winter months, theater of great tragedies of the sea.
But above all it is a land of rabbits and birds among which we can distinguish the puffins of the sea with the characteristic triangular beak of a bright orange with yellow and blue stripes wearing the frak.

“UNA BARCHETTA IN MEZZO AL MAR”

“Phelim’s little boat” or “Báidín Fheidhlimidh” (Báidín fheilimi) is one of the “songs of the sea” and is taught to Irish children at schools being a rare example of a bilingual song. Almost certainly handed down for generations in oral form, the song may have been composed in the seventeenth century.
Despite appearing as a nursery rhyme, the ballad tells the story of Feilimí Cam Ó Baoill, or Phelim O’Boyle, who, to escape his bitter enemy, abandons Donegal. He was one of the Ulster leaders of the O’Neil clan, one of the largest tribal dynasty in Northern Ireland (see). A warrior-fisherman leader who, to avoid conflict with the Mac Suibhne clan, or Sweeney, takes the sea on a small boat to the island of Gola; but, still not feeling safe, he changes the route to the island of Tory, more jagged and rich in hiding places, even if more treacherous for the presence of the rocks. And right on the rocks the small boat breaks and Phelim drowns.

The Gaelic here is peculiar because it comes from Donegal and has different affinities with the Scottish Gaelic. Baidin is a word in Irish Gaelic that indicates a small boat and the concept of smallness returns obsessively in all verses; so the nursery rhyme has its moral: in highlighting the challenge and the audacity in spite of a contrary destiny, we do not have to forget the power of the sea and we must remind that freedom has a very high price.

Sinéad O’Connor from  Sean-Nós Nua 2002:  ua voice with such a particular tone; here the pitch is melancholic supported by a siren-like echo effect. In the commentary on the booklet Sinéad writes:
It tells the story of Feilim Cam Baoill, a chieftain of the Rosses [in Donegal] in the 17th century. He had to take to the islands off Donegal to escape his archenemy Maolmhuire an Bhata Bu Mac Suibhne. Tory Island was more inaccessible and seemed safer than Gola, but his little boat was wrecked there. For me, the song is one of defiance and bravery in spite of terrible odds. It is a song of encouragement that we should be true to ourselves even if being true means ‘defeat’. A song of the beauty of freedom. And a song of the power of the sea as a metaphor for the unconscious mind. It shows that we can never escape our soul.”

Na Casaidigh from Singing for memory 1998: a fine arrangement of the voices in the choir and a final instrumental left to the electric guitar in a mix between traditional and modern sounds very pleasant and measured.

Angelo Branduardi from Il Rovo e la Rosa 2013,  (his Gaelic is a bit strange!) the arrangement with the violin is very precious

English
I
Phelim’s little boat went to Gola,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat went to Gola,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it
Chorus:
A tiny little boat, a lively little boat,
A foolish little boat, Phelim’s little boat,
A straight little boat, a willing little boat,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it.
II
Phelim’s little boat went to Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat went to Tory,
Phelim’s   little boat and Phelim in it.
III
Phelim’s little boat crashed on Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat crashed on Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it.
Donegal Gaelic
I
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Gabhla,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Gabhla,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Curfá:
Báidín bídeach, Báidín beosach,
Báidín bóidheach, Báidín Fheidhlimidh,
Báidín díreach, Báidín deontach,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh’s Feidhlimidh ann.
II
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Toraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh’s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Toraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann.
III
Báidín Fheidhlimidh briseadh i dToraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh briseadh i dToraigh,
Báidín  Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann (1)

NOTES
1) or Iasc ar bhord agus Feilimí ann  [Laden with fish and Phelim on board]

THE DANCE: Waves of Tory

The island has also given the title to an Irish folk dance “Waves of Tory” which reproduces the waves breaking on the rocks! Among the dances for beginners is performed with one step and presents only a difficult figure called Waves.
see more

LINK
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18074#177081

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/waves-of-tory.html